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RGronovius

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RGronovius last won the day on December 20 2019

RGronovius had the most liked content!

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About RGronovius

  • Rank
    Acrylic Addict
  • Birthday 02/18/1964

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  • AIM
    RGronovius
  • MSN
    rgronovius
  • Website URL
    http://
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Profile Information

  • FirstName
    Robin
  • LastName
    Gronovius
  • IPMS Number
    43603
  • Local Chapter
    IPMS Louisville (MMCL)
  • City
    Elizabethtown
  • State
    KY
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fort Knox
  • Interests
    Modern US Armor and our targets

Recent Profile Visitors

1,073 profile views
  1. There have always been mundane subjects such as automobiles or cargo vehicles that were not historically significant machines. There are models of figures, monsters, animals, sailboats, and the entire science fiction genre of items that never existed or may have only been movie props. Even a model of the TV series Batmobile, a fairly iconic vehicle, is mainly a model of a vehicle that is just a mock up of vehicle that is based on someone's imagination.
  2. Modern water buffalos are normally assigned to the company's supply deuce and a half. So if the truck is bumper number A-4, the trailer is A-4-T. I can see a lot of interest in one of these.
  3. RGronovius

    tank tracks

    Okay, are you talking about the many small individual track links that make up one side of the tank track, you know, like gluing 100 of them together to form one side? Or are you talking about two long pieces of vinyl tracks which uses two per side for a total of 4 pieces of vinyl track? I'm not familiar with that particular kit. Many current kits include the tiny multiple pieces that form the track. Here is a link to an old track tutorial. https://armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=1737 But there are several kits that use two long pieces of vinyl track to make up one side of the track. Italeri's Leopard 2 comes to mind.
  4. Yes, solely for nostalgia and I really don't care about accuracy. I know I was not satisfied with my build way back then.
  5. Many years ago, prior to 1977, I got this 1/72 scale Monogram Tomcat F-14 kit as a birthday gift. I've stumbled across it once again and wonder if it's worth building or one of those old kits "not worth the glue or time"? https://www.scalemates.com/kits/monogram-5992-tomcat-f-14a--161285 As a kid, I don't recall much issue with it besides my using white gloss Testors paint from a small dime bottle and it looking like crap, but that was 40 years ago. It's not my normal modeling genre any longer, but the nostalgia sets in.
  6. Squadron carries the Hobby Boss kits for $20ish. Track48 slightly cheaper, but in Canadian dollars. http://www.track48.com/hobby-boss-c-18/
  7. RGronovius

    Ep. 4 Leia

    I remember getting mad at her for stepping out on Luke in ESB.
  8. RGronovius

    Ep. 4 Leia

    my first movie crush, the 13 yr old me wanted some princess.
  9. The Red Baron wasn't hunting innocent civilian pilots who were on a Sunday flight enjoying the French countryside. He was an aerial combatant stalking other aerial combatants during a World War. If he enjoyed what he did, it was probably so he could cope with the idea of hunting his fellow man, knowing he could easily become the hunted in a moment's notice. McVeigh's car or his Ryder rental truck would be rather morbid as would OJ's getaway white Ford Bronco (I know it wasn't his vehicle). You would probably have to put some sort of description of the vehicle's historical significance since many wouldn't know the getaway vehicles and just see them as model cars. Same with the airliners that were hijacked during the 9/11 attacks. They would require descriptive plaques to identify their historical significance. Everyone recognizes the Red Baron's triplane. Not everyone would recognize a Japanese plane that attacked the Arizona.
  10. I read the original version as a free Kindle book. It would be awesome to see a movie of it in its period correct era. Also the 1950s version with the America tanks and the brief glimpse of the flying wing bomber is also a classic.
  11. When painting modern US armor, I just go for "what looks right". The only time the tanks look the same is when they are fresh from the paint booth.
  12. And for out desert tan tanks, in the motor pool, the sun faded the top surfaces and any side surfaces that got direct sunlight. The side that was shielded by another tank or faced away from the sun looked very yellow compared to the sun faded bleached look of the upper surfaces. One tank, one paint scheme, two different shades.
  13. When we painted our M60A3TTS tanks, we often mixed different colors of paint to make it last. It never seemed like we had enough of the brown paint. So sometimes we'd pour some tan or black into the brown to make it last. While all tanks got the same base coat of forest green, the brown would then vary from an earth or baseball mitt leather brown to a kind of olive brown.
  14. As a lifelong US Army tanker and modeler, I always cringe when I see items piled on the blast panels of an Abrams tank or tank rounds loosely stacked on top of a turret like they are pick up sticks. Other items like rifles laying about in a diorama or set on an part of a vehicle that they would fall off as soon as the vehicle went into motion. It may look good, but not accurate.
  15. RGronovius

    Installing treads?

    There is a search field in the upper right hand corner, not sure how it searches, I don't believe I've utilized it before. Sometimes when the tracks are too tight, you have to do a little surgery by relocating the mounting axles for the sprocket or idler wheel inward just a few millimeters to give some slack.
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