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ipmsusa2

IPMS/USA Member
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ipmsusa2 last won the day on October 10

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About ipmsusa2

  • Rank
    Plastic Habit
  • Birthday 12/10/1942

Profile Information

  • FirstName
    Richard
  • LastName
    Marmo
  • IPMS Number
    2
  • City
    Ft. Worth
  • State
    Texas
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fort Worth, Texas

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  1. ipmsusa2

    3D printer for Modeling

    I have done resin castings of various subjects over the years and have sold many of them thru my Modelers Weapons Shop website. While 3D printing has tremendous potential for the modeler, particularly when it comes to aftermarket parts, you still need rather deep pockets. It just isn't there yet for most of us, but it's coming. For the moment, creating your own pattern in order to produce resin copies is still the best way to go. At the moment. And I say that despite the fact that I start salivating every time I see a new 3D printer show up on MicroMark or the DaVinci website. And consider one more thing. Unless you want to spend the money and time to learn CAD, you'll still need to create an original pattern that can be scanned to create the STL file that the 3D printer needs.
  2. ipmsusa2

    Opinion Needed!

    Hey Tony, Glad you like the site. Keep checking the site from time to time and maybe you'll find an ebook you'll want. Next one will be the Kinetic E-2C 2000 that I've been posting a build thread on. BTW, let me know what kind of subjects you would find interesting as Modelbuilding Guides. I'd appreciate it. Actually I'm an adopted Texan. Born in Memphis, Tennessee, I got to Texas as soon as I could and have been here most of my life. Can't think of a better place to be! Keep in mind a bumper sticker I used to see: On The Eighth Day He Created Texas!
  3. ipmsusa2

    Opinion Needed!

    Hello Mike, Appreciate your opinion on the website. After I married my wife, I found out where Tahoka is. BTW, she said that her parents lived in O'Donnell for a while before she was born. That would put it into the 1930s. If you feel like it sometime, give me a shout at 817-946-9670.
  4. ipmsusa2

    Opinion Needed!

    Thanks, Mark. Now if it does its job right, I might even sell a few ebooks!
  5. ipmsusa2

    Opinion Needed!

    Hi all, For those who would be interested, I just today activated my revised and ...hopefully... improved Author's website. You can find it at richardmarmo.com I would be most appreciative if y'all would check it out and let me know what you think of it, good or bad. Just be constructive whichever way you lean. Thanks in advance.
  6. Strangely enough, I've never paid any attention to the temperature. Over the decades, I airbrushed paint when it was 105 in the shade and I had to be careful that my sweat didn't drip into the paint cup. On the flip side, I've sprayed paint when it was so cold in the room that ice crystals were floating in the decal water. Of course I was spraying Model Master Enamels, Pactra, Floquil and two-part commercial urethane as well as lacquer at various times. Never had a problem. Why? I don't have a clue. About all I've ever done is toss in a little more thinner if it needed it, or retarder if the lacquer was drying on the nozzle. None of what I've described is recommended, but the point is that the ambient temperature...high, low or in between...has never seemed to be a factor on my projects. And keep in mind that I do this as a business.
  7. Thanks Gil. Those side windows are tricky because they're a butt joint all the way around, leaving you with minimal contact surface for cementing.
  8. As promised, Part 8 of the Kinetic E-2C 2000 with revised photos is now available for your viewing pleasure. You can ignore Part 8 and 8A. As usual, comments are not only welcome but encouraged.
  9. Hi all, Here's the latest on the E2C 2000. The canopy was masked with Montex Mini Mask (# SM 48321). Not only do they fit perfectly, you get a double set so you can mask both the inside and outside if you choose. I got mine from Sprue Brothers, but the Montex website is montex-mask.com. One advantage to Kinetic's canopy approach is that it includes a section of the fuselage. Since the canopy isn't a perfect fit...probably the result of a replacement part due to a short shot in the kit...it allows you to putty and sand any problem seams with relative ease. Incidentally, unless the Kinetic policy has changed, when you request a replacement part, they won't acknowledge the request. Just send the part when they get around to running the kit mold again. This means that your needed part will eventually show up in your mailbox anywhere from a few weeks to a couple of months or more later. Remember I said the wing fold joints and nacelle/wing joints fit perfectly? Well, they do. Mostly. But when I looked close, I found a slight step in the starboard wing step joint and a similar problem with the nacelle/wing joints. This is likely the result of the kit parts fitting as tightly as they do and it's something you need to watch out for. In any event, the problem isn't severe and can be taken care of without losing much if any surface detail, which can be easily restored. The port wing j´╗┐oint, nacelle area just took a little sanding and no putty at all. Whether the bulged side window...which is a separate piece that has to be installed before mounting the canopy...shifted during canopy installation or I simply screwed up the initial installation, I can't say. In any event, I had to carefully cut out the window and reinstall correctly. As it turned out, at least on my kit, the window was slightly too large to fit properly so it took several test fits and very gentle trimming to get things right. The eight-blade props are built up from a pair of four-bladers. Each blade also has an engraved leading edge that needs to be painted steel. Checking references, the steel sections appear to be everything from dark steel to bright aluminum. How much of this is due to light reflection and/or viewing angle I can't say. So for model purposes I chose to go with Model Master Metalizer Non-Buffing Aluminum. In an earlier installment, i installed brass tubing in the nacelles in preparation for removable props. To complete that system, I installed a length of 3/32" (.094") tubing in the back of each prop. Length of the tubing doesn't matter, within reason, and you'll have to align the new shafts with ye olde Mk. I eyeball computer. Done right, they'll spin like a whirligig if you hold the model in front of a fan. One of the eight-blade props completely finished. The white tips are decals and are designed to fold over to create white tips both front and back. It works for the most part, but you'll probably need to do a little bit of touchup on the back with Model Master Flat White. I did. And of course manufacturers logos go on the front of each blade, positioned so that the beltline of the logo aligns with the bottom line of the steel/aluminum leading edge. The decals from the kit sheet are appropriately thin, but they take a long time to release from their backing sheet. Since there are a total of 32 decals for the two props, you should plan on a relatively extended decal session. Also, I wound up using tweezers to handle and position all of the logos and some of the tip decals. The side windows have been corrected and reinstalled. The canopy section/fuselage seam has been eliminated. Last but not least, Finally the nose cone was added. The nose cone is indexed with a locator pin. As a result, the bottom part of the seam is a perfect fit but the top seam requires a little sanding to bring things into line. With that done, all that's left is a final shot of primer, finish paint and decals. Incidentally, 'all' is not as simple as it sounds considering the large number of decals.
  10. Tried to get the latest installment in before a doctor's appointment. Will repost when I get back with better photos. Tried to add ten photos and had to reduce the image size which resulted in lower quality/grainy appearance. My apologies.
  11. Hi all, Here's the latest on the E2C 2000. The canopy was masked with Montex Mini Mask (# SM 48321). Not only do they fit perfectly, you get a double set so you can mask both the inside and outside if you choose. I got mine from Sprue Brothers, but the Montex website is montex-mask.com. One advantage to Kinetic's canopy approach is that it includes a section of the fuselage. Since the canopy isn't a perfect fit...probably the result of a replacement part due to a short shot in the kit...it allows you to putty and sand any problem seams with relative ease. Incidentally, unless the Kinetic policy has changed, when you request a replacement part, they won't acknowledge the request. Just send the part when they get around to running the kit mold again. This means that your needed part will eventually show up in your mailbox anywhere from a few weeks to a couple of months or more later. Remember I said the wing fold joints and nacelle/wing joints fit perfectly? Well, they do. Mostly. But when I looked close, I found a slight step in the starboard wing step joint and a similar problem with the nacelle/wing joints. This is likely the result of the kit parts fitting as tightly as they do and it's something you need to watch out for. In any event, the problem isn't severe and can be taken care of without losing much if any surface detail, which can be easily restored. The port wing joint, nacelle area just took a little sanding and no putty at all. Whether the bulged side window...which is a separate piece that has to be installed before mounting the canopy...shifted during canopy installation or I simply screwed up the initial installation, I can't say. In any event, I had to carefully cut out the window and reinstall correctly. As it turned out, at least on my kit, the window was slightly too large to fit properly so it took several test fits and very gentle trimming to get things right. The eight-blade props are built up from a pair of four-bladers. Each blade also has an engraved leading edge that needs to be painted steel. Checking references, the steel sections appear to be everything from dark steel to bright aluminum. How much of this is due to light reflection and/or viewing angle I can't say. So for model purposes I chose to go with Model Master Metalizer Non-Buffing Aluminum. In an earlier installment, i installed brass tubing in the nacelles in preparation for removable props. To complete that system, I installed a length of 3/32" tubing in the back of each prop. Length of the tubing doesn't matter, within reason, and you'll have to align the new shafts with ye olde Mk. I eyeball computer. Done right, they'll spin like a whirligig if you hold the model in front of a fan. One of the eight-blade props completely finished. The white tips are decals and are designed to fold over to create white tips both front and back. It works for the most part, but you'll probably need to do a little bit of touchup on the back with Model Master Flat White. I did. And of course manufacturers logos go on the front of each blade, positioned so that the beltline of the logo aligns with the bottom line of the steel/aluminum leading edge. The decals from the kit sheet are appropriately thin, but they take a long time to release from their backing sheet. Since there are a total of 32 decals for the two props, you should plan on a relatively extended decal session. Also, I wound up using tweezers to handle and position all of the logos and some of the tip decals. The side windows have been corrected and reinstalled. The canopy section/fuselage seam has been eliminated. Last but not least, Finally the nose cone was added. The nose cone is indexed with a locator pin. As a result, the bottom part of the seam is a perfect fit but the top seam requires a little sanding to bring things into line. With that done, all that's left is a final shot of primer, finish paint and decals. Incidentally, 'all' is not as simple as it sounds considering the large number of decals.
  12. ipmsusa2

    Repair Assistance Needed

    Hi all, I received a phone call from a 78 year old gentleman in Norwich, NY. His grandson damaged a Sopwith Camel model...knocked the top wing off...and he needs it repaired. Wingspan of the model is approximately 15" and was purchased ready built. It is not a kit. It isn't practical for him to ship it to me in Texas for repairs, so I would like to put him together with someone in the Syracuse/Norwich/Binghamton area who would be willing to do the repairs for him. Anyone interested, please reply to my email at tennexican@gmail.com and I will provide the gentleman's name and full contact information.
  13. ipmsusa2

    The Duke's Latest Aircraft

    Nicely done, Duke!
  14. ipmsusa2

    Future E-Book Subjects?

    Gil, Another possibility would be the different variants of a single type, though that could get out of hand with the F4 Phantom or F-111. One I'm currently planning takes three Monogram kits of a single type and building three variants. One more or less out of the box and the other two with most or all of the aftermarket bells and whistles.
  15. ipmsusa2

    Future E-Book Subjects?

    Gil, You raise an interesting point. I'd have to limit a single ebook to three or maybe four subjects or the ebook would take forever to finish. For example, Building the Monogram 1/48th Medium Bombers. That would be the B-25, B-26 and A-26. It's an interesting idea and something I'll strongly consider. Of course there would still be single subject ebooks, so I'd appreciate your ideas there as well.
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