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Dakimbrell

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Dakimbrell last won the day on October 14

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About Dakimbrell

  • Rank
    Plastic Habit
  • Birthday 06/25/1954

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Profile Information

  • FirstName
    DAVID
  • LastName
    Kimbrell
  • IPMS Number
    39410
  • Local Chapter
    Oklahoma Historical Modelers Society
  • City
    Norman
  • State
    oklahoma
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Norman, Oklahoma
  • Interests
    Renaissance Modeler

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  1. What is has to do with general modeling is how it effects what we show on the website and at the contests. If we do not discuss these things, then people begin to feel disenfranchised when they are not allowed to enter a favorite model at a show. Also, the people righting the rules need feed back from the membership. Many years ago, the contest committee made a bunch of very arbitrary rules without good feed back and that cost IPMS members and still effects the shows to this day. I have had heat discussions with several of those posting here and yet nothing said here seems political. Only by ignoring the subjects do we create problems down the line. I don't see the Baron as a serial killer....at least in a criminal sense. I just felt that was a good place to start the discussion. I like pretty girls, so nude or sexy figures don't bother me in the least. However, there are some subjects I do find inappropriate for public display at a convention....that sadomasochistic stuff. It generally doesn't "offend' me, but I can see why it might surprise and offend those not expecting at a model show. Of course, the only people I know who have purchased things like the Mascot figures have never built them. LOL I don't see any difference between McVeigh's car and Galland's Me-262. The only difference to me is time: the OKC attack is too close for some people. Some things are just going to offend some people. One guy I know thinks models which display any human remains or children's toys (dolls, tricycles, or teddy bears) should not be allowed. My friend Foster did a superb Mercedes 170 delivery van vignette with the title Arbeit Macht Hungrig and someone was offended by it. One reason he used that title was his Jewish ancestry. This year at Chattanooga, Mike Fleckenstein did a very nice vignette Will Someone Say Kadish For Them. I really liked it, yet I know there were some that felt it should not have been there. Personally, I have been doing "Germany in defeat" for about a quarter century. (The only exception being the Battle of France.) Yet, I would never ban a swastika as an historical marking. I also see myself as an artist and the models...particularly the dioramas...tell a story and show something I want the public to see. I recently did a ADGZ armored car placed in the town of Lidice, Czechoslovakia because I want people to remember. Dak
  2. The Baron, stalked his prey and attacked from behind and kept trophies of his kills. Just like a serial killer. Is it appropriate to do a model of a serial killer's stuff? I was looking at the contest rules and those that have won over the years and wonder what most serious members think is an inappropriate model or contest entry. Personally, I'm an artist at heart and find very few things offensive enough to be band or remove it from a contest. However, I am aware others may not feel that way. So, what offends you and why? Would a model of one of the 9/11 planes be ok? If so, how is it different from the plane that sank the Arizona? Is a model of Timothy McVeigh's Car ok form the National? If not, why would a model of Hitler's big six wheeled car be ok? We do swastikas and naked girls all over airplanes, but showing a dead body seems to upset many. Seems strange to me. Thoughts? Dak
  3. Have you posed the model beside the real thing? At least, Panzer Grey and Olive Drab look way to dark if you don't lighten them. Now, what about seams that SHOULD be there, but have been removed or filled by the builder? I see this a lot on aircraft undercarriage and the rubber tires on tank roadwheels, in particular. Thoughts? Dak
  4. This is why we don't judge the shade or color of paint at most contests. However, the shade of paint does effect the opinions the viewer. Those final moments of the judges trying to decide which will be the last three models and which will be first or second, etc, everything comes into play. I use to use Model Master paint straight out of the bottle, but now I do a 50-50 mix of flat white and RAF Middlestone to get the Panzer Yellow I like. I prefer a bluish tint to my Panzer Grey, even though evidence shows it has a brown tint. As far as I know, there is no exact scaling of paint chart. When it comes down to it, people see colors differently...at least they seem to....so the best you can do is try to find a shade you like and hope it works for others. However, on very dark colors like black, Panzer Grey, etc, I would recommend lighting the color a bit regardless of scale. Tires should always be done in dark grey, not black. Dak
  5. The effect is not based on the light source. It is a well noted effect cited in numerous books such as he Kookaburra Luftwaffe Painting Guide on page 5..."the camouflage colors should not be strictly as laid down in any RLM color charts, but should be a few shades lighter if one is to achieve any sort of realism." The method we use to apply decals....a clear gloss, the decal, a clear gloss and then a clear flat also sharpens and brightens the colors. This is a method similar to that of the 17th century Dutch Masters like Rembrandt and van Dyke. Everything old is new again. I also saw an F-4 Phantom with the rescue arrow painted off register...just like a few decal sheets I have seen. Dak
  6. That's one of mine, also. But I have pictures of tanks in North Africa where the tracks are clearly not sinking into the soil. However, they are making some tracks on the surface. Dak
  7. Yes, I have noticed this on several models over the years. Dak
  8. I would disagree. Far too often colors look too dark to be correct. At Chattanooga, I judged a Panzer IV that was almost black looking. Of course, we don't judge the color, but shade has a definite visual effect, and when it comes down to the final points, not looking "right" can cost you a first place, or bump you to fourth place. Noting that the paint used on a model is the real color is wasted on me as a judge leaving me unimpressed. But an exact shade of paint is absurd. There are simply too many variables. Dak
  9. I was not criticizing the use of real automotive paint. I was criticizing the idea that the real color is the correct shade for a smaller model. If you are trying to make the model look realistic, the color should be lighter the smaller the model. If you put the real thing and the finished model together under the same light, most will say the model is a darker shade of paint. So yes, I find it silly to use the real automotive paint straight out of the can to achieve a visually authentic look. Dak
  10. I basically have said this numerous times, but immediately get told we don't judge any of this, which is nonsense. Which is why I started this string in an effort to get people to discuss what elements are important and why. Tor example, accuracy and authenticity imply slightly different things. That you have a client that wants something a particular color is not an issue here...perhaps not even relevant. That is a whole different ball game from doing a model for a contest. Instead of satisfying one person, your are trying to satisfy several who all have a different opinion. First, there is yourself...what color looks correct to you. Then there are the judges who may disagree and those that are sticklers for that mythical perfect color. And everyone may be wrong anyway. Hinze the wisdom of not judging shade of color. But that does not mean some things are not simply wrong. Dak
  11. Maybe you did, but I haven't worried about the exact color since 1976. Even though the Haze Grey was manufactured in a modern plant under peace time conditions, we still mixed the cans of paint to ensure consistency. Anyone that thinks there is an exact shade of paint beyond a color chip, is living in a cloudy cookoo land. The true check of a beginner is the "What is the best shade of...."question. The smaller something is, the darker the same shade of paint will look on it. I always find it a bit silly when a friend uses a real car paint on his model. Dak
  12. People get different signals from IPMS. On the one hand, we say build what you enjoy and do your own thing. Then we do the contests and get very picky about what gets trophies. The guy who did a lot of work.....but got all sorts of stuff wrong from authenticity to basic craftmanship.... wonders why he didn't win anything. Why is filling a seam so important? Look at all that detail I added! Look how big my diorama is! Dak
  13. Building a model is the boring part, to me. Research makes it interesting. Having a fairly accurate kit to start with is a plus. This allows me to be creative. Obviously, most members like authenticity. The range of books which are available and the increasing accuracy of kits proves that beyond a doubt. Interstingly, I know a guy that feels filling seams is boring and takes away from the fun of building and painting. (His exact words.) He thinks it is unfair for IPMS to worry about seams and such. Go figure! Dak
  14. That is why we don’t judge shade of paint. There are simply too many variables. Still, people will build stuff and do things without even looking at the most basic references. I’ve seen engine decks opening the wrong way, “tank crew” wearing infantry harness, markings put on backwards, etc. New information comes out all the time, so it is understandable some things get done wrong, but some stuff is pretty silly.....like a Me-109 G10 done in Battle of Britain markings. Why? Because the builder assumedall Me-109s were the same. Dak
  15. I agree, but at the same time realize these are things often hard to judge without first hand knowledge. Every operational vehicle I have been on or in is covered with foot prints. Still, many build their models as a case of immaculate perception. But it isn't fair for someone to do things correctly, but lose to a model with a lot of inaccurate, but aesthetically appealing details. I would love to see someone do a piece for the Journal on the basic dos and don'ts of modern armor stowage. It wouldn't have to be an in depth thing, just a photos and such showing authentic things. The more people know will make them better builders and judges. Dak
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