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  1. Note: This is my personal opinion based on my own experience with both our local shows and the IPMS national convention NCC needs to address this issue within the rules asap or well soon possible. With todays electronics there is no reason why anyone should need AC power for their creations. Providing power is a huge expense and pain for the host clubs. Vegas spent over $1000 providing power for the model room. That averaged $110 per model that needed power. If we are serious about keeping convention cost down we need to stop placating to contestants that cannot build around such a rule as "No AC power will be provided for model entries, no exception. Three options, provide your own AC power backup, purchase the AC power from the host site. ($$$$), build your model with simple DC battery power." Not meant as an insult anyone but we somehow need to real in cost and this is simply one convention expense that is way too high. Joe Porche #20296
    5 points
  2. The old Bandai 1/48 armor kits were really gems at the time and still aren't all that bad. They all sported at least a minimal interior while other companies kits had nothing but old motorization brackets. This one is bound for Malta camouflage. I completed the interior with some extra "busying-up" parts added, like some more bins in the hull, some wiring a recoil guard for the main gun and I bodged together a sort of #19 radio set. The turret basket is not accurate and is actually in common with that in the Valentine kit. As a matter of fact, if you check the one in the ESCI 1/72 scale Valentine, you'll find it's also the same. But accuracy aside, again, at least there's something in there to see through the hatches I intend to leave open. In the end, it turned out pretty well for a kit that dates from 1975. The figure is from the Tamiya Humber a/c kit as there was no crew in the box when I got it. This is everything before exterior painting started, with the exception of the exhaust system. And here's the final product.
    4 points
  3. Hi All, I'm pleased to report a bid for the 2024 National Convention was submitted. It will be evaluated by the Eboard and details will be shared at the National Convention in Omaha. Thank you all who have reached out and supported the current bid cycle. See you in Omaha! Cheers, John
    4 points
  4. Recent Group-Build /Theme for Pittsburgh IPMS Club was the 80s. I discovered a Fujimi 1/72 Sea Harrier from our in-House Dealer(Pusher) and at $7.00 started down the Rabbit hole. Yes.. Resin Interior,Master Models Pitot and a second kit for Falkland Markings had me following the white Rabbit. Cut Canopy open,Added a few antenna, Opened up some vents and out challenging was dropping Engine vents for Ground Ops. Gunze Dark Sea Gray, GX-100 and Markings for HMS Invincible . Please note "007" how could I not choose this 😃. Thanks for Looking Comments Always Welcome Cheers Bill
    4 points
  5. Since it was "Mustang Madness" week on the D&S FB page, I started this 1/48 Tamiya P-51B last Sunday afternoon and finished it this Friday evening, for a 6 day build. It's generally OOTB, though I did add a few doo-dads I had in the box: Moskit exhausts, resin tires, pe seat belts, Eduard resin 75gal wing tanks, a Quickboost resin N2 gun sight, MV lenses for the underwing IFF lights, and individually punched instruments for the featureless kit panel. Markings for the Boise Bee are from Aeromaster. The only drama in the build was when the black hole surrounding my work bench swallowed the left rear fuselage clear panel, forcing me to make another from clear sheet to replace it. All in all, this was a fun, fast build that puts the stash down one more! Gil
    3 points
  6. As JB VP#2 previously said 2023 is taken care of by San Marcos, Tx return to the plate. That with 6+ years of planning should be an awesome convention and I am looking forward to attending. As for 2024, I have lent my hand to all those that have reached out for info for their proposals based on my experience here in Las Vegas and I am sure that that you all will be happy and excited about the bids that will be coming forward soon. There will be bidders for 2024 and possibly 2025. Joe Porche' #20296 RC#8
    3 points
  7. Alan Doroff Models AMMO by Mig Atlantis Models Barracuda Studios Bases By Bill Bill Hubbard Bob's Models Bret Ellis Bullseye Model Aviation Casemate Publishing Cult TV Man Custom Dioramics Dave Babcock David Doyle Books Dean's Hobby Stop Detail & Scale Eduard Models Flex-I -File Flying Leathernecks Decals Free Time Hobbies Funkerdecals GT Resin Guideline Publications Hailstone Graphics Mike Hagel Heartland Hobby Joe's Models John's Models Kinetic Models Kitlinx Lion Heart Hobbies Lone Star Models Louis V Models Model Geeks Podcast MRC Models Nankin Hobby Nautilus Drydocks Obscureco Olive Branch Design Phantom Phlasers Phantom Phreaks Decals Philip's Woodwork & Models Phoenix Scale Publications Plastic Model Mojo Podcast Plastic Posse Podcast Rare Plane Detective Revell-Monogram Models Rhino Hobby Tools & More Ronald McNeil Models Scale Aircraft Conversions Scale Color Paints Scale Finishes Scale Motorsport Skylancer Productions Special Hobby Spray Gunner / Grex Sprue Brothers Starfighter Decals Star Realm Squadron Signal Publications Sub Committee Tag Team Hobbies Tamiya Models Thomas Copeland Models Tom Burns Tom's Modelworks / White Ensign Models UMM USA Value Gear Details (Resin Bits) Warbird Decals
    2 points
  8. Thank you Gil! It is indeed an ancient kit. I still had a blast building and painting it. The 'wooden' prop was done with a base of wood color and then striped with a darker brown using a very fine brush.
    2 points
  9. After all that work in the hobby room and at St. Crispin's Hobby Days, I am finally able to call a few more done. These are two of the five models I just completed, the other three are in the Armor Forums. My first finished model is this Aoshima 1/72 scale Japanese OH-1 "Ninja" scout helicopter. This is an indigenous design made in Japan: My next finished model is the Atlantic re-pop of the ancient AH-56 Cheyenne in 1/72 scale. I built her strictly out of the box: The description of this helicopter in the history blurb on the instruction sheet says this was designed to have a 30mm cannon in the turret beneath the cockpit. She was also capable of loading all the rockets, guns and missiles that the Apache could load, as well as carry Sidewinders. Someday I hope to make one of these with all those to see what this would have looked like in service. Until then, thanks for looking in, comments are welcome.
    2 points
  10. I continued with my little project of working on these old artillery kits. This is the LifeLike release of the what they call a WW I 75 mm. It bears little resemblance to a French or post war US 75 and looks more like, but not exactly like, a German WW I 77mm. It has elements of all those guns. Given that, and the fact that the mold was a mess with almost as much flash and mold seams as parts, with careful assembly and an interesting paint scheme, it can build up into a nice desk model. In the photos, if the wheels look a bit out of whack, some of that is camera distortion, but they were out of alignment. A little 'gentle persuasion" and they are better now.
    2 points
  11. Finished my 1/48 ProModeler SB2C Helldiver today. It proved tougher than expected with mods needed to get the rear cockpit parts to fit properly and to shore up the fit and strength of the main gear. I used the Wolfpack resin wingfold set. It fit well.... the only mod I made was to drill and pin to add strength to the folded wings. I also used an Eduard colored PE set in the front and rear interiors. All in all, this was a good exercise in overcoming some frustrations. I've never had "basic" engineering problems with anything Monogram related before, and the extra work needed to make up for the problems sucked some of the fun out of the build. Still, I'm very glad to have the only WWII USN carrier plane I didn't have on my shelf parked among its peers! Gil
    2 points
  12. Well this is gonna be a long one. Not because I bought a lot but thanks to the extreme generosity of someone on another Forums who surprised me with them. Here's the one I bought. I got it with an Amazon Gift card given to me for my birthday: I already did get that started. A few days before that T-62 came in, I got a message letting me know to BOLO, because a box was heading my way filled with small scale treats that he knew he was never going to build. He wasn't kidding. Here they are, armor first, than aircraft, then ships: That is one I'd wanted for awhile, but never figured I'd ever get because I had too many others I wanted more badly for my limited funds to stretch to this. It's been started. Next is this one still sealed: This one I hope to make an air ambulance: Now a few Airfix kits, starting with this one: And now for the ships: This one, as you can see, came with no instructions. No worries, I can download them from Scalemates: I wrote that on the box top so I wasn't frantically trying to find them once I decide to build this. Now for all these Tamiya ships: And finally another one I'd wanted for a long time: And that one is started as well. All those details and more can be seen on my next tour of my plant. Enjoy!
    2 points
  13. I'm mainly a 1/48 scale WW2 aircraft modeler. As such I have had the "Invasion Stripe" discussion many times with different people. I am firmly on the side of "sloppy work looks sloppy". In 1/48 scale an error of 6 inches is an 1/8 of an inch. Most people can hand paint fairly straight lines over a short distance. In order to have a variance in a line that is detectable at 1/48 scale it would have to be blatent in full scale. Perhaps someone out there will figure out how to pull it off realistically one day but I've never seen any attempt that looked anything but sloppy.
    1 point
  14. Hey Gang, been a while. I still haven't fully gotten my mojo back, tho it is getting a little easier to force myself out of the chair , and up the stairs to my hobby room. This time I have CGS' Wyatt Earp, in 200mm. The arms were separate from the body, and hands, which were in the rifle. So it was a bit of a juggling match to line everything up. Another problem was the rifle barrels were warp, and needed the hot water treatment to straighten The other thing I noticed was that the head was sculpted separately from the body, and the pupild were sculpted in looking straight ahead. Putting the head on the bod where he should be looking down the barrels in the movie, he was looking off to the side. IMHO it looked silly and had to repaint the eyes over at the very end. All in all it was a good kit. Thanks for looking.
    1 point
  15. Finally, enough time in the day, and no complications, to get in a good bench session. I did the last bits of airbrushing, then started removing all of the masking. Some of that dampened tissue paper in certain areas sure was reluctant to come back out, and that ended up causing me to knock a 5” rocket loose during the handling. But man does this look good now. One more good session and I ought to be able to wrap this one up…
    1 point
  16. No other links Gil (I wish), but if you look below the drawing of the Wildcat there are some pics of part of the test shots. I know it's not much, but what you can see looks REAL nice. Also a pic of the marking options.
    1 point
  17. The Super Hornet of VFA-37 is I finished! I finished applying the decals and then top coated the aircraft. I then wet sanded the windscreen and canopy with 1000 then 2000 grit sandpaper to remove the mold seam on both parts. They were then polished with the Meguire’s Plastx cleaning/polishing compound. I installed all the weapons, centerline tank, and Litening pod to the underside. The HUD and windscreen were installed. I positioned the canopy in the open position and this completed the aircraft. The kit itself went together well with the exception of the intake fit. As noted this kit represents the early super hornet so I added the ECS tubes for the later version. The Furball decals were pretty good. The only issue I had was the walkway stripes fell apart due to the thin film when I tried to slide them off. I ended up using the kit decals for these. Overall I am happy with the final results. I also took some photos next to “C” model (also a Revell kit) so that you can see the size/shape differences between the two. I also included a photo with a VA-37 A-7E. I served with VA-37 and transitioned out just before the changeover to the F/A-18’s. I just need to build an A-7A with the early VA-37 markings to complete my set of VA-37/VFA-37 aircraft. Thank you for following along – Happy Modeling! Check out all the photos and details from the start to finish in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-a-18e-super-hornet-from-vfa-37/
    1 point
  18. This month has been a month of completing a couple of shelf queens, with possibly more on the way. This has been under construction for more than five years. The Maddog Manufacturing Shipyards has launched this RAF Rescue Launch for shakedown cruise and delivery to my British Navy: That is the ancient Airfix original issue of that kit in 1/72 scale. It took some doing, and some parts are still missing but for a started kit that I got in our Distressed Kit Auction, it looks pretty good to me. Thanks for looking in.
    1 point
  19. I like the suspense and anticipation. It’s fun. It adds to the enjoyment and excitement of the Nationals. Nick
    1 point
  20. Details will be shared in 36 days 🙂
    1 point
  21. C'Mon, Columbus....!!!!
    1 point
  22. We are locked in for 2-5 August of next year (2023) in San Marcos, Texas. -Len
    1 point
  23. Greetings. Yes, as John mentioned above the dates are firm for 2-5 August of next year (2023). Team Texas will be going into full prep and communication mode after Omaha wraps up. I'll be briefing details of the 2023 show to the society at Omaha and I'll be more active here on the forums to answer any questions. I'll create a dedicated 2023 thread here in the forum where I'll post all updates. -Len
    1 point
  24. It couldn't get any more Nebraska than this!!
    1 point
  25. The third week of the super hornet I finished the main landing gear. I then moved over to the missiles. I did not like the details and sizes of the kit missiles. I have two Meng kits that covers US missiles so I decided to use the AIM-9X from the one kit and the AIM-120C from the other kit. While they were drying after the initial painting I was looking over the fuselage and noticed that the kit does not include the ECS tubes between the tails for the later “E” version. I purchased the Eduard Brassin resin set and grafted these onto the fuselage. Since this is more or less a fictitious scheme I read that the US Navy is considering using a Litening targeting pod on the super hornets. So I used a 3-D printed Lightning pod and added a couple of Eduard resin GBU-54 bombs to the kit. With all the under wing stores built, painted, decaled, and ready for mounting I then started painting the base coat on the aircraft. I used Vallejo light ghost gray for the underside, dark ghost gray for the topside and the tails were painted dark sea blue. The gun plate was painted Vallejo metal color gunmetal. I am now working on the decals. Looks like I should have this build completed soon. Check out all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-f-a-18e-super-hornet-from-vfa-37/
    1 point
  26. If Dave Fredericks was building this kit, it would run 😉 But not mine… 😆
    1 point
  27. Ok, I’m calling this beast completed… an old shelf of doom damaged and sidelined project, many years, moves and repairs later, the old Dragon T-72M2/T-72B w/ERA. I added some resin stowage and figures. Also had a driver figure in there, but his head blocked the turret from rotating forward, so he was nixed… “Vanya, what’s that flash in the treeline?” Thanks for looking, comments and critiques are welcome…
    1 point
  28. So I’ve gotten in a few aircraft kits over the past couple of weeks. A couple off of eBay, and one from consignment at Andy’s Hobby HQ shop First up, an old ESCI Mirage 5 that was the consignment find. then off of eBay, these two, where each one had the seller offer them up at discounted prices now for me to get an aircraft project finished up this year…
    1 point
  29. cheveuxroux, Don't know where you read that, but I checked photos on the interweb and yup, that's what it's modeled after. Very good info to have.
    1 point
  30. I couldn't comment on that. I have never been to Brothers Sebastian. My suggestion, they are less than 5 miles apart. Dine at both and I am sure you will get a fine piece of beef at both. Omaha is a real center of all things beef. How I came to know about the Drover was that several of our local Uber drivers said it was the best. I can't disagree with them. Outstanding steak. What I do know is that Drover has absolutely top quality meat and a whiskey sauce that is most enjoyable. If you do choose the "Both" option, let me know what you think!
    1 point
  31. Good thing you have that under a clear cover; wouldn't want any of that gas to escape! LOL! Sensational work David, You've captured well the atmosphere of the trenches in those days of the Great War.
    1 point
  32. A pretty old kit. The only small issue I had was the rear portion of the canopy was warped. Was somewhat apprehensive about trying to fix it . Because of this, I left the canopy cracked to get some airflow. Kit landing gear was replaced with Scale Conversion metal gear. The decals are from Zotz. Chris
    1 point
  33. Adding a figure for scale is something I may wish to do for a future car model as the kit is not the standard 1/25th scale. I'll need to check with the chapters holding the contests for how they judge. Thanks for the heads up!
    1 point
  34. Next up is an interesting subject. This is the 1/48 Brengun MQ-8B Fire Scout. This is a helicopter drone built by Northrop Grumman and is used by the U.S. Navy. It is typically deployed on FFG’s and LCS ships. The reason I chose this is I am a member of the International Plastic Modeler Society (IPMS). I belong to the Mckinstry Chapter and we have monthly meetings. Typically each month we have a theme. One of the upcoming themes is “Missiles and Drones”. I looked over the available model kits of drones and thought this would be a little different than the combat drones many are used to seeing. This kit is a full resin model. Resin models are cast in resin rather than injection molded styrene kits. There are fewer parts than a typical model and instead of trees the parts are attached to the base of the cast. Many of the smaller parts can be trimmed from the base using a hobby knife. The larger parts require a jeweler’s saw to cut off the base. Once I had all the parts trimmed I started assembly. Resin models do not use typical model glue. They require a CA glue for assembly. I assembled the fuselage, tail boom and nose. The fit was very good except for the bottom edge of the nose which required a little putty filler. The kit come with a sheet of photo etch for some of the smaller details like the antenna blades. I added the photo etch pieces and then sprayed the fuselage with light ghost gray. For the turret under the nose I mixed some Pearl EX pigments in the Tamiya smoke paint. The main lens and the bottom right lens were mixed with gold pigments. I used blue pigments for the bottom and right side lenses. The left side lens I use the green pigments. Once dry I added a final coat of the smoke paint. I noticed that the decal sheet did not include the laser warning labels on the turret. I made my own decal labels and applied them. For the final step on the turret I drilled the holes in the back of the mount so I can add the cables later when I mount it. I am now getting ready to apply the kit decals. The decal set comes with two schemes and I will be doing the HSM-35 “Magicians” scheme. Check out all the photos and details in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mq-8b-fire-scout-drone/
    1 point
  35. Decided to go for an all metal finish.
    1 point
  36. Not an issue I have seen myself. I do not prime with gloss black. I usually use Stynylrez black, white, or grey primers. I have recently found however that it works fine over bare plastic too. I typically spray at 15 psi and mist the first coats on then hit it with a wet coat almost immediately. Not the recommended procedure but it works for me. Most of my Alclad stash is close to 10 years old so I don't think age is a problem. However the formula may have changed. Paint issues are always interesting. One thing is for sure, different people can see vastly different results from the same product. Chemistry, bah humbug. 🙃
    1 point
  37. Finished! Now on display....warts and all....
    1 point
  38. Not the easiest new tool Airfix kit to build but it's such a cool looking aircraft, I had to build it. I did end up using the Eduard Zoom set though.
    1 point
  39. This whole build started last July after I saw the kit re-released by Round 2. I've had visions in my mind for years of building a 1967 Mustang Fastback model as it would have been if I had one. I've had the pleasure of owning three 67 coupes and always wanted a fastback in real life. My last Mustang was the best of the three because it was built from the first two cars and I had managed to score a 351W from a 69 Mach 1. She also had a 4spd manual transmission and 3.55 gears. The first car I had I managed to purchase from my home town. It had a 289 2bbl with an automatic tranny and 2.79 gears. It wasn't fast but it was a good lookin' car. On one of my many trips back to Ft. Hood from my home town in North Texas I hit a deer and destroyed the front end of the car. (going off into the ditch is the WRONG thing to do when dodging animals I found out). The deer was only the beginning of the damage....while dodging the deer I didn't look on the OTHER side of it and dove into a concrete drainage system. This car....was done.....and I walked away without so much as a scratch. Whew!!! Car #1: Acquired 1989-Decommissioned-1990 I found Car #2 in a wrecking yard and rescued it. Man.....that car was rough looking BUT.....it was a GT and had all the options to include tilt away steering which was a very weird option but definitly good on the cool factor. This car also had a standard transmission from the factory. No engine or tranny was in the car when I bought her for $100 but I quickly took care of that. The 289 was carried over from Car #1 and I got a close ratio 4 speed tranny for this one. Later on I bought the 351W I was talking about earlier and freshened it up and dropped it into this car and drove it for a few more years before somebody pulled out in front of me at Ft Hood. I dodged but not before I hit him with my drivers side door in a side skid. Jeez.... Car #2 before the wreck: Acquired 1990--Decommissioned 1991 and after: The tilt way column that I was talking about. This was supposed to help with driver ingress and egress. Definitely different: This is where Car #3 comes in. Acquired 1991--Sold 2002 I bought her for $600 at Fort Hood and towed her back home. I had two other parts cars now to draw parts from to make this one the best car out of the three and one that I would have for 11 years. Me and my best friend built this car over a course of 5 days from this at day one: to this at Day 3 moving under her own power. The next two days involved finish up...bumpers, trim, interior and all the cool stuff to make this car driveable. The end result: Now....all of this is where the inspiration for my build here came from. I wanted to build a fastback with all of the things that I had in this last car with the only difference being that I wanted factory style wheels on this one. And so, I set out on my venture. I purchased this kit....and went for broke. I finished her this morning. Color is Acapulco Blue from MCW Finishes, Wet Look covers the clear coat. The pad printed tires in this kit are a God send and thanks to Eric Oberhaufer at AMT the change out from the Firestone Super Stock tires that this kit came with got changed out to the Wide O Oval tires you see in the following pictures. Model Car Garage covered most of the PE items that you'll see on this car with PE kit # MCG-2032. Joel at Iceman Collections provided the Cobra air cleaner, HGW Models provided this 1/48 scale REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT tag hanging from the rearview mirror and the CPC 64F (the same tag that was on Car #3) license plate and plate frame were provided by Thomas at Speedway decals. Throttle linkage, air cleaner wingnut & washer, fuel lines and brake lines were all either fabricated or drawn from PE parts bin. Throttle return spring is an element from an automotive turn signal bulb. Plug wires are from Lex's Scale Modeling and the 650 cfm Holley Double Pumper carburetor was from Shapeways. The hood scoop is from the AMT GT-350 kit and was graphed onto the stock hood. I also cut out the area of the hood where the scoop was to allow the air cleaner to sit up inside of the scoop from proper hood closure/ seating. Outside door handles are from Fireball Modelworks, Alclad applied to both and pinned in place. A good amount of work had to be done to get the front suspension lowered achieve the stance that I wanted and the front wheels had to be moved in ......significantly... to go inside of the wheel wells where they belonged. The rear suspension had to be raised so a light re-aching of the leaf springs is all that took. This kit is a good kit overall but there are some notable areas that need mentioning. Firts off ...the good. The base engine was well represented with only a carburetor change out needed to spice things up a bit. The interior is also well represented with good detail. The aluminum plating on the dash face is a BEAR to replicate on this one as is the door panels. If anyone's interested in how I pulled that off let me know and I'll be happy to tell you how I managed to get through it. 80% of this build was pretty straight forward BUT....the fit between the nose piece and the drivers front fender on these kits is very hard to get flush. I spent all KINDS of time trying to fix the issue and STILL ended up with a slight gap. Test fit--sand-test fit--file--test fit and MORE TEST FIT is required to get this part right. The fuel cap sticks out way too far because it's thicker than it needs to be. I took sandpaper and stuck it into the contours of the tail light panel and sanded it down to what I felt like was the proper thickness. The front and rear bumpers had little braces going down on either side of the license plate area and I don't care for those so I cut those off of both bumpers, stripped the chrome from them, cleaned 'em up and worked the Alclad magic on both. I'm pretty happy with the turnout overall as it's just the look I wanted to get from the build. Thank you guys for following along, encouraging me and helping me get through this one. Finishing shots:
    1 point
  40. Judging is always subjective....to address your specific question; IF the "ragged" paint edge on the prop on the model was done to "scale", and looked like it was a case of "field Painting" (versus sloppy modeling), then it's not gigged. BUT, much of the time, whether it's THIS or (perhaps) an attempt to paint invasion stripes in a "realistic" sloppy manner, the modeler cannot pull it off in scale. A more experienced judge MIGHT know that in the ETO there was a shortage of tape and often planes were masked and painted with wet newspaper, making for sloppy edge lines and overspray. Also, they often had to buy "local" stocks of paint (for houses and cars) and thus they didn't wear on the airplanes as well as aviation grade paints, leading to ragged wear lines. BUT, a LOT of judges DON'T know that....and thus will chalk up those attempts to failed model painting. You pays your money and ya takes your chances! My advice (as always) is build it the way YOU want to for your shelf, look at winning anything as "gravy", and don't worry if the judges know less than you and don't give you the benefit of the doubt. Gil
    1 point
  41. Welcome to scene 10 as the climactic ending begins. I installed the skis and added the safety cables that assist in keeping the skis horizontal using EZ-Line. The engine bell housing and propellers were installed as well as the wing tip lights. One of the things not represented in the kit is the windscreen wipers. I took some spare photo etch pieces and made the blade and arms then installed them. I then added all the antenna wires both under the nose and on top using EZ-Line. There are two small “T” shaped antennas under the fuselage near the tail. I trimmed up some scrap photo etch to replicate them. Next I used some scrap photo etch and made the cargo door hinges. With all the small details added I thought I had finished the aircraft. While uploading the photos to the computer I realized I forgot to paint on the wing walkways and the anti-glare area on the nose. I painted them as well as the fuel ports on the top of the wings. While the real aircraft has the de-icing panels painted black, none of the screen shots show these painted the typical matte black. I left them unpainted to match the aircraft in the movie. So now the aircraft is complete except the snow weathering which will be added when I mount the aircraft to the base. For the final week of work I am building a snow base to display the aircraft. I bought an 18” wooden disk which came with a white washed stain on it as well as a Scene-O-Rama snow kit. I currently am still looking for 1/48 scale dog sled team and arctic crew figures. I have a friend who is looking to design files for the 3-D printer but these files may take a while. We went over some of the scenes from the movie (The Thing from another world – 1951) and he is going to pose them as they are returning to the aircraft with the frozen alien on the sled. When I build the base I will add in the footprints and sled marks so these can be added later. So the current display will be just the aircraft on the snow and assuming the crew is down by the buried flying saucer. Stay tuned for the conclusion of this project. Check out all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-r4d-5-tropical-tilly/
    1 point
  42. Onward to scene 8, the work this week was spent preparing and painting the base coats. The overall aircraft was painted with Tamiya bare aluminum. I have a copy of the USAF technical order for painting numerous aircraft. I verified the yellow stripe is insignia yellow and the other color is international orange. I then loaded the DVD of “The Thing from another world” into the computer to see the placement of the yellow fuselage strip and the international orange areas. During the research I realized that the boomerang antenna and the forward mast antenna atop the fuselage which were mounted in the kit locations were in the wrong location. After some careful removal I relocated them to the same locations they are on the aircraft in the movie. The stripe area was masked and painted. The decal set provides a decal for the stripe but I prefer to paint it on. I next painted the international orange areas. While the pain was drying I looked over the decals. The USAF Tech Order shows that the R4D’s used the 40” stars and bars. The decal set comes with the 36” version. I then made my own 40” starts and bars decals. The one on the port side of the fuselage covers the fuselage and both cargo doors. I measured and cut up one of the insignias and put the decal sections on the cargo doors. While the paint was drying I did some more work on the main gear. I decided to use aluminum tubing as the axle for the wheels and skis. The plan for the upcoming week is to finish the decals and give the aircraft a nice gloss coat then work on finishing the main landing gear. Looks like just a few more “scenes” to finish this one. Check out all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-r4d-5-tropical-tilly/
    1 point
  43. As we move onto scene 7 of the R4D this week I have the resin nose shaped. Need to scribe some panel lines and rivets still. I looked at the exhaust. The resin kit has the correct version for the R4D, however it was designed for the Monogram kit and is too large for the Trumpeter kit I am using. I used a styrene tube to make the exhaust and some aluminum tubing for the center portion. With the wings attached I then noticed this kit comes with the long scoop on top of the engines. The R4D uses the smaller scoop. I trimmed the kit scoop for shorter length and shortened the height a little. I used some styrene to replicate the backside of the scoops and blended it with putty. I also needed to fill I n the cut-out above the engine with some sheet styrene. While the modified scoops were letting the putty cure I looked at the main landing gear and the skis that will go on them. The kit provides rubber tires and they would not fit between the resin ski rails. So I took some measurements and decided to modify the skis. I cut off the rails from the ski and using .020” sheet styrene I made the bottom of the ski and added the rails. The rails have a crossbar. This needed to be removed and replaced. The rails needed to move out .005” on each side. With the skis modified I needed to change the mounting. The axles that came with the kit for the main wheels are too short to fit the skis. I will be using aluminum tubing to make the extended axles. Just a side note, I do not need to check the tail wheel ski. This will not be used. In the movie (The Thing from another world – 1951) there is a scene with Captain Henry and the Colonel where they mention on a previous landing the broke the ski off the tail wheel. All of the scenes in the movie with the aircraft show no ski on the tail wheel. This coming week I am getting the aircraft ready for painting. I have numerous panel lines and rivets to add back onto the areas that were modified and to mask off the areas. I am hoping to start painting by next weekend. Check out all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-r4d-5-tropical-tilly/
    1 point
  44. latest pic of the Beaufort build....
    1 point
  45. Moving forward to scene 6 on the R4D-5 this week I loaded the cargo in the cabin. The two crates were strapped in using straps and rope as depicted in the screen shots from the film. I also added blankets and bags as well. The fuselage halves were then put together and clamped. While the fuselage was setting I started on the R-1830-92 engines. The detail of the kit engines is very good. The only thing you need to be careful with is making sure you don’t mix the left and right engine parts. The keyways are different between the sides which could affect the position of the front of the engine when it is installed later. With the fuselage together I started to fill the gaps and seams with putty. Aside from the gap on top of the fuselage there are uneven sections along the seam. There is also a gap around the tail wheel well which was carefully filled. While the putty was curing I built up the main landing gear bays into the upper wing sections and installed the engines. Turing back to the fuselage, the seams were wet sanded. The resin nose was then aligned and set in place. Once the putty is cured I will then begin to wet sand and shape it. Next up will be assembling and installing the wings and re-scribing panel lines/rivets. Check out all the photos and details from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-r4d-5-tropical-tilly/
    1 point
  46. I was first introduced to UGears on Kickstarter years ago and was intrigued by the engineering but never got around to buying one of their kits. Well, the other day I got a message on Facebook(I follow them). I did not know that they where a Ukrainian company(that is what the U stands for) with their factory on the outskirts of Kyiv. I have found no information on the state of the factory, but I cannot believe that it is good. The message said that the US arm is donating 10% of the sale price to Ukrainian refugees funds. I don't know about you, but that was the impetus to get me to dig out the credit card. I may just order another one just to try to keep the company afloat after the war is over. To the administrators: If you deem this to be an inappropriate post, please remove it. I am a bit caught up in this moment in history and want to do what I can to help the Ukrainian people in some way.
    1 point
  47. I use solid pieces and use different brushes and swabs to apply it. Weathering with Pastel Chalk – David's Scale Models (davidsscalemodels.com)
    1 point
  48. The “Gail Ann” is now completed! The final week started off with adding the decals. The aircraft was then weathered slightly with pastel chalk and then sealed with a matte finish. The HUD was then modified by cutting off the thick gun sight and replacing it with a piece of clear acetate. With the sight installed the armored glass for was then added to the windscreen. I assembled the correct propeller, painted, decals added, and installed it. The wingtip lights were installed and the recognition lights under the starboard wing were finished off. EZ-Line was used to add the antenna. The gun barrels were painted with steel. The last detail I did was to cut off the rear navigation light and replace it with a clear lens. This completed the aircraft! The end of the week I assembled the display case. I used the Scene-A-Rama “sand” sheet for the base. Once it was glued down I sprayed some dark sand to represent the edge of the taxi lane and some black staining on the areas around the aircraft that were high traffic as well as the supercharger exhaust area. I cut out an area for the nickel nameplate. I used nickel instead of brass for this so the nameplate would stand out a little better. I then drilled holes in the bottom of the aircraft wheels and installed metal pins in order to mount the aircraft in the display case. With the base finished off all that was left to do was add the clear cover completing this project. This will be packed up and shipped out the client this weekend. Thank you all for following along on this historic build of the Gail Ann as she was on Saipan in 1944. Check out all the photos and details from start to finish in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-p-47d-razorback-gail-ann/
    1 point
  49. Well, this is interesting. Personally I think the E-board/NCC could have squelched all this debate when they first came out with OOB rules: the answer is in the description: NOTHING! When you start allowing things to be added, then everyone is going to try to game the system. If the NCC had held firm to 'NOTHING can be added if it wasn't packed in the box by the manufacturer', then this would not have been an issue. Oh, but what about making something look accurate? Well, as far as I've ever seen, accuracy is not judged in our contests: build techniques are. Another question squelched. These are MODELS! They are representations of real vehicles and structures (and in some cases people). There is no way anyone can make a perfect model, despite many people striving for one (and coming damned close I might add!) But the answer again is also in the name: Out of the Box. Strictly speaking, that means the parts on the sprues only! Not even parts from the instruction sheet unless the instruction sheet has a specific design that they indicate needs to be cut out and applied. In these days of kits including P/E and/or resin parts added by the manufacturer; then they can be added as they are IN THE BOX. Proof is in the instruction sheet. Can I add seatbelts? NO! Unless they are included on the decal sheet or P/E fret! Can I use decals other than those in the box? NO! They didn't come packed in the in the box by the manufacturer so those other decals are not Out of the Box. Can I add rigging to my ship? NO! Unless the kit includes a roll of thread or material for rigging! In other words.... Can I add _______? Answer: Was it in the box and/or included in the kit by the manufacturer? Then NO! Ever since joining this organization I've always understood OOB meant anything that was included in the box.... period! Because of that I seem to be the only person in this organization that has always built models to the strictest interpretation of this OOB rule as I have outlined it above. Rarely have I added aftermarket additions to my models; but only when someone gifts them to me as I would rather spend my extremely limited funds on more kits than extra parts. It always mystified me when the NCC said, "you can add this, but only this in this category". So they in effect violated their own rule by making exceptions. Since this class of models has this exception, then can I add____ to mine in this different class? So you see, buy not standing firm on NOTHING outside the box can be used, they started this slippery slope themselves. Can I add this_____? Was it in the box as it came from the manufacturer? There's your answer. Gee, I'll never understand why everyone has to make this so hard. Regardless of what people finally decide I shall continue to build my models OOB as I interpret the description and I will enter them in the contest wherever they fit. I never expect to ever win; it's all about the camaraderie and friendships and the chance to ask respected friends to check out my work. If I win, that's just cream. Stop asking "What can I add?" and just BUILD IT!! Geez!
    1 point
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