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  1. He ruthlessly seized power in “ The Night of the Bloody Xactoknives!” 😉😂 Anonymous (for fear I might be next to ‘disappear’ )
    4 points
  2. Last time I built a F-105G, I was in the 7th/8th grade. No paint, or decal, just good old Testors tube glue. Had a blast. Decided to add lights and sound. Went on YouTube, and found “F-105D startup”. I’m using a Bose Soundlink for a speaker. Going to build a jet blast wall to put it in, The lighting is the same kind I used to light up the inside of the Sherman. Hobby Lobby carries these mini LED light sets. They have a portion of a row devoted to different sets of these. Easy to use, and really cheap.
    3 points
  3. Got some more work done in the Radio room and the bomb bay....... Radio room side walls...doesn't look like that much, but it involves more than 30 PE parts... A few door doo-dads added to the bulkheads... Bomb bay side walls,,,unpainted so the parts can be seen before they're blended in... Bomb Bay doors and the center bay brace.... Not sure how much will be seen, but it's being added! GIL
    3 points
  4. Decals are now on. So many to apply… all 10 of them… lol! 6 Red stars, 2 Bort numbers, and the “boosted” stencils on the cowling. Amazingly the Hobbycraft decals worked very well! Just gotta add the final bits, do a sealing top coat, and this will be all finished…
    2 points
  5. My buddy Bradley25mm likes how this is coming along so I thought I’d post it up. Really really taking my time with this one. working tonight on lots of weathering. This 1st set is all about a new technique. I read a 3 part article by john miller on model paint solutions for the P-38. Before I left on my last trip I squeezed out a dollup of oil onto cardboard and left it for 10 days. Came back to "rendered" oil pigment. Blend some with odorless turpenoid, put a drop in the center of a panel and let it spread. use your hair dryer and then repeat till the color is as dark as you want. i finished off tonight using a dark brown flory wash on top. The underside went so well and it drys right away compared to when i use the straight oils that i tried it on top. Then rendered oils for the exhaust staining. I wanted one darker than the other. Not sure tho if it's toooo different. Let me know. btw it's not this bright or coppery in person.
    2 points
  6. Built this one for a co-worker who crewed P-3s in the Navy. Built OOTB; but I did have to make the bat tail art and paint the wing walks since the old kit decals were pretty well shot and I could find no aftermarket decals for VP-24. Now on to that 1/32 B-17E! GIL
    2 points
  7. You and me both Mark! Although back then I never built any WWII Russkie planes. Only the postwar stuff, mostly Migs, that was in all the hobby shops back then… Well, I’ve got the basic colors on now. Underside is Humbrol enamel 114, Russian Light Blue. My old bottle of Polly S Russian Underside Blue had dried out since my last Red Air Force build… Topside is Polly Scale USSR Light Topside Gray. That took two thinned coats hand brushed… I had painted the side exhaust panels with Testors square bottle Steel last night next up, the Dark Gray disruptive pattern…
    2 points
  8. So basic construction is now done. All that’s left to glue in place are the usual breakables: landing gear, pitot tube, antenna mast, and the bombs… All ready to start painting later this evening…
    2 points
  9. Why yes, yes they do. They are the same exact criteria that IPMS/USA uses--well, at least they are in most of the shows that use open judging that I am familiar with. Repeat after me: Straight, Square, Plumb, Fit, Finish. R
    2 points
  10. Dak is right. It’s not rocket science. It is hard work, however, to obsessive- compulsively set aside any bias you may have, ignore what you “like” (or don’t like), and conscientiously and scrupulously apply the judging criteria to each entry-as a team. I would also submit that, perhaps, judging is not a good fit for anyone who thinks that they can pick the winners 98% of the time after the first walk through. That kind of “Pride ….goeth before destruction.” It also is a disservice to every entrant in the category and inevitably tempts one to ignore what is a clear mandate given every year to every judge- evaluate each entry carefully. Nick
    2 points
  11. Guys, I think this thread is now getting a bit wearing. Hopefully we all agree that judges give up a lot of their own time to adjudicate and do the job to the best of their ability. We should be thankful for those folk taking the task on. Debating about contests, classes, trophies, judging and so forth can go on ad infinitum, and this thread appears to be testament to this. Judges feedback. The idea in principle is good, but I fear that it can lead to judges setting themselves up for face to face confrontation with an aggrieved contestant. You can please some of the people some of the time, but you cannot please all of the people all of the time.
    2 points
  12. Sore losers! Don't we all just love them. NOT! If someone feels bad enough about losing to threaten a head judge, or throw a trophy to the floor like a spoilt brat in a fit of anger because they are convinced that their model should have been judged better, then they have no place in IPMS. Judges are damned if they do and damned if they don't unfortunately by those sort of people. Fortunately they are in a very small minority and IPMS would not suffer if they simply walked away from the society. The vast majority take losing with a bit of dignity it has to be said. There are many who support the contest year on year never win anything and never grumble. Without those competitors the competition tables would be a sorry sight. Most of them take the view that their models are being shown at a prestigious event in the model making world. It is those modest guys who pay their subs and contribute to the society and the nationals by entering regardless of whether they win of not that keep the society flourishing at grass roots level. This society like others has very competitive individuals at top level. Fortunately most of those top modellers however are quite approachable and only too willing to share tips and techniques with others enabling them to develop their skills too.
    2 points
  13. This is a kit by Good Fellas Resin, designed to pay tribute to an artwork by Max Dunbar. It's an adult, post apocalyptic, Charlie Brown and Snoopy - It was a well engineered kit, and a pleasure to build and paint. Thanks for looking.
    2 points
  14. Some more progress along the same lines..... Cockpit walls and seat supports just sitting together for the pics... Cockpit side walls Front radio room bulkhead Rear radio room bulkhead Rear cockpit bulkhead Kit ammo chutes and aftermarket 3D printed ammo belts Bombs glued up... More pics when more gets done! GIL
    2 points
  15. So last night I received a special request via my brother in law from his grandson, my great nephew, that he would like another plane from Uncle Carlos. I have given him several of of my older builds. Now how can I say no to such a lad? The only problem was, I only have a few days to get it done before our next trip to visit, so the build has to be quick and simple. After mulling over my stash last nite, I settled on this baby I’m going old school and high speed, so no add-ons, just straight OOB. I’ve built the related La-7 kit many years ago and recall it is simple and straight forward, if somewhat inaccurate kit. So no real surprises or speed bumps should delay this. Besides, this gives me an excuse to get the newer & better Zvezda 1/48 La-5 FN…
    1 point
  16. Don't know when the picture of the Russians was taken. But, if it was long enough ago, and they were Soviets, they probably earned most of them. The Soviets loved to hand out medals, but during the Great Patriotic War, the Russians who had only a few medals were often the ones who didn't make it.
    1 point
  17. I wasn’t comparing anyone. I’ve truly thought it would be fun to wear awards at a show since some such as medals and medallions on ribbons are designed to be worn. As most modelers know, WWII Germans wore their medals into combat and the Russians definitely liked the bling. Americans tend to go for simple ribbons which I find more tasteful in general—-no pun intended—-situations. If we use awards which are designed to be worn, why not wear them. After all, many wear the contest pins to show they are “veterans”. I personally prefer small awards like medallions that are easy to pack and display with the model in display cases. Dak
    1 point
  18. Time for another update tour; this one is a small one given how little time I got to spend on the workbench. Fortunately, I did manage to finish four models; you'll see them in the finished forums. I'll start with my aircraft, since all I did was to shoot another coat of white on them after fixing a few blatant blemishes. First was the Norseman: And then the Fokker F-27: My apologies for the pics there; they were taken in my 'spray booth'. Barring any unforeseen additional blemishes, I'll be gloss coating these soon. Now on to my armor, and another apology: I said I wouldn't have any more pics of my Centurions here, but then I realized I still had a ways to go on my Australian one. To start with, I'd forgotten to put the outer return rollers on the one side. Kinda need them since this tank has no skirts: After that I figured with all the moisture in South Vietnam where this operated; I would rust out the exhaust covers a bit: Moving on, I wanted to get some more progress done on another Centurion; this time the Israeli Sho't Kal Alef. I added the turret storage bins, the fenders and storage bins on them as well: After that, I re-started another two projects that I'd been neglecting, why; I don't know. They are so close to paint now so I finished up adding all the extra parts and adding the "open" hatch to the Type 89B: Type 89A: Type 89B: There are more detail parts to add later but they would break off during painting and handling so I am leaving them off till last. And finally, this last model that has been annoying me by being in the way all the time: my M-ATV. I cemented the interior to the chassis and then finished painting the interior so I could close this up: Before I could close it up, I had to add the photo-etch grill screen on the front of the hood: Finally, this beastie is all closed up and the rear bed is attached as well: I realized later that there was a photo-etch assembly that needed to be added to the interior. Oh well, it wouldn't have been seen anyway inside this thing with such tiny windows so I'm not bothered. Now to finish the upper turret, add the windows and some other detail parts before painting. That's it for now. Stay tuned as I hope to have more to show later. Thank you all for looking in, comments are welcome.
    1 point
  19. I get 300 medals at a time from Mission Awards for our local shows, and that lasts for two or three years (depending on attendance, of course). The package is smaller than a standard box of copier/printer paper. Extrapolating that out, 1,000 awards would likely be two copier paper sized boxes. If you stick with the current format, you use about 600 category (1st/2nd/3rd) awards at a National show, which means there will be maybe 400 surplus medals. So we're back to something the size of a copier paper box as far as goes shipping/storage. As far as how many awards should be purchased? For a 1-2-3 show, this is easy--look at your historic numbers. If your usage across the last three shows is 600 awards on average, buy twice or three times that. Make this a National office duty--the 2VP adds this to their Convention planning punch list: "Verify number of category awards on hand, order more if needed". It can be done at the conclusion of the current show, before the surplus gets shipped to the next host. And if the margins are shaky, order more right then and there and have them drop shipped to the next hosts. In 2016, we had some 60 plaques left over. They are now sitting in my garage, collecting funk, since they are dated and themed and cannot be re-used (other than to pry the metal placard off and use the wood plaque as a base). At $6 a pop, that's $360 that IPMS/USA paid out in that cannot be recouped--using standard awards, that money could be used for shipping costs. And if you can't ship 600 medals (based on an order of 1,200 total--600 used at the current show, 600 left for the next one) for less than $360 bucks, you're using the wrong shipping company! And it isn't as if other stuff doesn't get shipped from one host to the next from year to year anyway... . Attached is an image of our medals. They are 2" die-struck medals with antique finish. You can get them with or without the ribbon. Our last order was made in April 2020, and including shipping ($36, for the record), the total was $861. $861/300=$2.87 per medal. As Gil said, you can have a sheet of round Avery labels available so the entrant can record what the award was for. In our first show, we actually made custom labels, as shown in the pics, and filled them out as part of the admin duties after judging. It is labor intensive, though, so the next year we stuck the labels (again, customized for that show) to the medals and let the entrant fill them out. Here is our source: Mission Awards, Inc. 2030 Tonawanda Lake RD Grawn, MI 49637 E-mail: SALES@MISSIONAWARDS.COM Phone : (866) 396-5481 Fax : 231-276-7682 I've worked with Tim, but anybody on their sales staff ought to be able to assist.
    1 point
  20. What self-respecting craftsman would be expected to use unusable decals on a project he or she takes any pride in? What competent judge would do anything but wonder why any sane modeler would think 50 year old decals could be made to work? All such a requirement would accomplish is to discourage modelers from tackling interesting old kits because they could not possibly make the markings look good. The NCC has too much good sense to give that idea any thought. Nick P.S. Consider the impact on old kit sales. Why buy something you could not possibly decently finish?
    1 point
  21. Just a suggestion. The dates of the convention are not shown on the Homepage. It might be helpful if they were.
    1 point
  22. Mark and Gil, thank you. Mark, he is 7. Not sure if he’s gonna be there with his gramps when we are there. Perhaps one day I can teach him how to build, but I don’t think that’s too likely. Well, this is as far as I’m going to go with this tonite. Fuselage assembled IP Drybrushed and cockpit installed Tomorrow I will get the seam clean up done and all the major assemblies added. It should be some serious construction progress.
    1 point
  23. IIRC, that's how FSM started out, in the mid-1980s (cue the nostalgic music).
    1 point
  24. As noted, people care about winning. If not, no one would bet on the Supper Bowl or the World Cup. No one actually loses in this contest. What happens is is many don’t win. There is a difference. No matter how good you are, there will be someone who is just a tad better. In the end, it comes down to what the judges liked about a model more than what they didn’t like. And someone will still say they got it wrong. Dak
    1 point
  25. Open Judging is what many call the "Gold-Silver-Bronze" system, where each model is scored/evaluated (since some contests using this system don't do scores) individually, and multiple models in the same group can earn the same award, i.e., if the category is Armored Vehicles, Allied, 1935-1945 and there are 15 models in that group, all 15 can earn a medal. That's why I try to state "open judging". As far as I know, all IPMS/USA shows other than the National Convention contest are "Opens", as in open to anyone who wants to enter. The only obstacle to entering an IPMS/USA National Convention is membership--you must be an IPMS (any branch) member to enter.
    1 point
  26. Gotta concur....excellent! Now git 'er done! GIL
    1 point
  27. And the band kept playing on! Titanic 1912
    1 point
  28. And how you fairly decide what to pick as best is by scrutinizing, as a team, every entry regardless of how long it takes! Nick Filippone, Senior National Judge
    1 point
  29. Here is where I come from. At one contest, I was involved with two other judges who took 2 hours to judge 15 models, in 3 categories, because they felt obligated to look at every little detail. In the end, the results were exactly the same as my choices when we started and I did an initial sweep of the entries. 3 of the models were eliminated because they belonged to one entrant who had multiple entries. I do not say we should not look at construction and finish, but spending 15 minutes quibbling over a possible seam line on the drive shaft of an Opel Blitz truck which could only be seen with a flashlight, is a waste of time. At some point, just pick what you think is the best. There will always be someone who disagrees with the results. Dak
    1 point
  30. Jim and Dak, I love the passion that you both have for the hobby. Jim, you state that we should be judging on what the best crafted model is. I agree. How do we do that. Yes, the easy way is alignment because it can be measured. I get your point of view. What I think you fail to realize is that what the majority would differ considerably. No one buys a magazine because "wow, look at that alignment." Yes, it can be hard to judge based on likes. Keep in mind that it is not being judged by one person but generally 3. What if that was expanded? The problem I see with the way things are is that winning an award at IPMS means less than being "judged" by other contestants that come by and tell me what they liked about it. Some in the hobby may see a great reward from a perfectly constructed model, but the hobby means different things to others. This also comes to the awards. Cool looking awards are a lure but there is more to the value. Do Olympians have more motivation based on the look or scrap value of the metals? I also like how you see success as number of entries in the contest. That may be one way of looking at it. Have we looked at other goals other than sheer entries? Number of new members? Number of Juniors? Satisfaction from surveys? It just comes off as the one cable company in town thinking that they are doing well because the sales figures are doing fine. You may say that your role is an administrative role but you have an elected title. You also set the direction for how the rule book is interpreted. You also represent the organization in these forums and social media.
    1 point
  31. For me, (please don't judge) as long as blatant sex of any kind is left out, I can deal with everything else. I know that's a loaded statement (such as define "blatant") which is why I refer to "me" only.
    1 point
  32. Here you go, Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland Ohio!
    1 point
  33. Darn those specifics! They always annoyingly get in the way of what one of my teachers called ‘ hasty generalizations.’ Some prefer heat. I prefer light. Nick
    1 point
  34. Jim Clark, A race has a winner or winners because some are physically faster than others. This applies to many things. However, model building is creative. Even just doing OOB, the builder has to make multiple decisions on how to make the model look appealing. Which is a better model, a Bf-109G6, a Fw-190D-9, a A6M5, or a P-51D? All four are Tamiya 1/48 kits and built by very good modelers. Pick only 3 and put the those in a descending order of quality. This is the problem faced by IPMS judges every year. I see you acknowledge I did not make the earlier remarks, but don’t actually apologize for slandering me twice. You seem to be making this whole discussion extremely personal. I only made a suggestion and I have explained my idea repeatedly and also said—as I do now—there would need to be some additional changes, but otherwise the judging methodology would remain the same. I have also said I don’t expect the current setup to be changed. Yet, you continue to harp on the idea. While I have thought my idea out in some detail, I see no reason to write out 15 paragraphs in this forum and bore everyone to death. IPMS has a reputation as a bunch of sanctimonious nit pickers because we try to be as fair as possible. That after all these years, we still have “oddities” and complaints crop up every year, shows me we are missing something in how we do things. So, review and reflection seems to be a proper thing to do. Sometimes you have to think outside the box. Dak
    1 point
  35. I see that the word "cheap" has been used in the sense that it is a flimsy plastic tchotchke. The medals we use are quality die-struck metals with an enameled front. They have heft, and they serve the purpose of recognizing the category winners--which is the object of the exercise. Using your award numbers, and the cost per medal of the last order I placed: 603 awards X $2.85= $1718.55 for the category medals (1-2-3 in each category). Color sublimated plaques--about the cheapest non-generic thing going--run between $6 and $8 each at our local trophy shop. I'll use the lesser figure... 603 awards X $6 = $3,618 for the category plaques (1-2-3 in each category). And if you don't have three models in a given category or if the host even has a 1% or 2% overage, you have awards that go unused. What do you do with the left-overs? A generic medal can be put back into the box and passed on to the next show. The color-sub plaques are stuffed in a box and stored, never to be seen again. If you can convince the trophy shop to take them back so they can re-use the plaques, fine, but they aren't going to refund any of your money. And if you purchased laser engraved acrylics or some other elaborate award for the general category winners, you are stuck with them. Why is this concept so difficult to embrace? Spend the big bucks on the awards you know will be given--Class awards, Theme awards, Special awards, Best of Show awards, etc. For the entrant, what do you do if you want one of those Big Shinys? Simple--Build a better model. (Of course, this gets on the subject of "How do I do that?", and IPMS/USA has no real answer to that question other than to say "Build a better model"...) Of course, could it be that some don't like medals because someone might mistake a contest that uses medals for awards as a show that uses an Open Judging system? I can hear the argument now... "I don't want to go to that contest! They use medals, they must be some of them Pinko Commie Open Judging subversives! We're 'Muricans, dammit! We wants us some real winners, not them pansy 'ticipation awards y'all hand out to ever'one!" To answer the other question, "What's the point?" What's the point in competition to begin with--especially on something we supposedly do as a pastime? Somewhere in the primordial days of IPMS, it was decided that a model exhibition would be a fun way to get together. And hey, a friendly competition might be a good thing. Oh, and maybe we'll give out trophies to the models a group of peers deems to be "good". Somewhere along the line that concept got perverted into this Win At All Costs, "You ain't a 'real' modeler until you win at the National Convention", vision that far too many modelers these days hold in their noggins. As I asked someone, are you seeing these simply as a token recognizing your effort, or are you redecorating your home and trying to make sure your model awards don't clash? As I said, we put far too much emphasis on the award itself instead of what it (supposedly) represents... What's the point, indeed...
    1 point
  36. I still say small medallions are the most classy. They don’t have to be generic, but that doesn’t really bother me, if they were. But never go back to the big ugly bowling trophies, please! Picking what we like best is not the worst way to chose winners. In fact, it may turn out to be the only way if numbers of entries continue to grow. Dak
    1 point
  37. Gee that's the one thing that makes each hosts unique to their show, the awards. You start handing out cheap generic awards then what's the point? As it is now we have 196 categories splits included plus 5 ad hoc contest wide awards for a total of 201 for a grand total of 603 awards.Thats a fixed number. Anything else makes it damned hard to plan for and how do you limit what gets what if you do anything else? You have no number to work off of. I would rather have judges nit picking then picking what they "like" .My question is how am I as a builder supposed to know what a judge likes and which judge will I get to look at my model, i'll need to know this so I can build to what they like so as to be judged fairly. See you can't do that and be fair. The more Objective you are judging the better as it takes bias out of the equation. I also say that's why the lady holding the scales is blindfolded. That's why I tell my guy's it's not about what you like, it's about what's on the table and what errors you find so that you can quantify your rankings .I would much rather be ranked against my peers than to be given a grade by someone who likes or dislikes my model. And what qualifies that person to give that grade,that opinion. Judging is much different than grading. Also more times than not 1st place jumps out at you and it's the placement from 2nd and 3rd or two contesting 3rd place that's a chore.One year (OKC) we spent alot of time trying to decide on 3rd since all the rest entrants had big issues. This year I had a team tell me every single model save for first place had basic alignment issues in their gear. So how is it that all of these models need recognition when most are having real issues? And finally we want to "grow" the society, we want more and more models on tables. We had over 3k in Vegas, we're pretty damned successful as it is, why do we want to mess with success ? We're quickly getting to the point where we won't be able to handle the job of judging. And everyone with all their suggestions need to remember and consider the judges volunteering their time. Push to hard for drastic changes and you'll loose the judges. Then what happens? do you have a reserve pool of 250 judges sitting around that I don't know about and if so why aren't we using them now? Jim Clark NCC/ Head Aircraft judge
    1 point
  38. I found this on another site
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. From the 2021 National Contest Rules (underlined italics for emphasis): II. CONTEST DEFINITIONS AND JUDGING 1. Judging. Models will be judged for skill in construction, finish, realism, and scope of effort; accuracy may be used as criteria for determining final ranking for similar model subjects. In short, accuracy is a final ranking criterion or a tie breaker. I encourage all to read the rules. Though not germane to this discussion, I really encourage all to read the category descriptions.
    1 point
  41. This is the 1/35th Meng kit with the Niko Models tail skid and a Nemrod figure of a French tanker. The tank is seen during 1936. In 1940, Normandie was re-named Loraine and later destroyed by its crew to prevent capture. The model is 15" long with the tail skid. Dak
    1 point
  42. Dakimbrell I call B.S. on your statement that flying the US Flag in the front yard is a fashion statement. This 20 year Air Force veteran flies The Flag in his front yard, 24/7. It is lighted and replaced regularly. I am extremely PROUD of that flag and the country that it represents. Saying "it is nothing but a symbol" really burns me. It is far more than just a piece of cloth waving in the breeze. It stands for the country behind it. Many men an women have sacrificed their lives or well-being for that flag and country and for you to say what you do dishonors them. I'll quit now before I say something that might "offend" someone.
    1 point
  43. LOL! Thanks Gil! I didn't unpack most of my models as I had no space for them. The difficult part was in getting all my purchases and prizes stored away!
    1 point
  44. I was on the team for this category, and the props on the wrong nacelles was the main problem. There was some kind of minor issue with the landing gear or the wheels, but I can not recall exactly what it was.
    1 point
  45. Hi Cameron, TAG! I'm it. Or at least one of the three its. I was one of the three judges for THAT specific category split, 107A. Aircraft; Small Prop; 1/48 — US / Allied Inline, Commonwealth. FWIW, we three judges (Bruce, Guy, and myself) LOVED the opportunity to judge that category split (there were a total of 6 splits for 48 single-prop). Nearly all 23 entries in that split were awesome builds to view so closely. Of course, that meant that our job was very challenging. As has been mentioned elsewhere, our first task was to review all entries to first confirm that they were all in the correct category and split. Next, using the model entrants' numbers (aka IPMS/USA member number written on the entry sheet) we collected mini groupings of entries from the same builders. Then we chose the best of each builders' entries to be used for judging and gently placed all others towards the back of the table to free up space towards the front of the table. Part of that process involved each of us spending a certain amount of time individually looking closely at each of these models to ascertain each entries pros and cons. We then re-grouped and compared our individual findings where we sometimes learned from each other about areas where we might have not found specific pros....or cons.... Discussions developed, observations were weighed out against each other (model), and we arrived at our collective decisions. This amounted to a repeating process as we began (if you wish to call it this) "eliminating" models that displayed the more significant levels of flaws. Each level of elimination included closer and closer scrutiny beyond the mire obvious. This also included narrowing down our findings to a level of "nitpicking" build quality flaws that out weighed build quality excellence. While we three judges did engage in serious and frank discussion, at no time did we ever need to elevate to "heated" debate. We all worked well together and found common ground of agreement on all issues. I can tell you that many of our first level "eliminations".....were the result of "basic" building flaws...(alignment, visible seams, and translucent painting....to name a few). The one flaw that became quite prevalent was found using a small (mini) flash light pointed from the aft of the subject directly at the windscreen and canopy(ies) areas. That was where we found many models with not only the translucent paint on canopy/windscreen frames (not minor but significant translucency!!!) but also windscreens that "hovered" over the fuselage where there were definite cases of the windscreens having NOT been glued down completely. Simply, the light would clearly shine thru the gap! The second most common short coming were the alignment/positioning of the horizontal stabilizers. Minor anomalies weren't counted so much as the obvious (unquestionably) ones. We didn't need to use the ruler method, just the Mk.I eye-balls, looking from the front of the subject (approx. 2-3 feet back), and lining up the horizontal stab tips with the top of the wings. Another common issue that arose was found by directing the light obliquely across seam areas (ex: fuselage tops) to find "over sanded" seams (aka flats), and "under sanded" (or stepped) seams. As for your models here, I think that you can look closely for the noted issues and see how they compare. While these issues were not necessarily THEE reasons that yours might not have placed, they may have contributed to a sort of "stacked up" mini list of observed anomalies that led to our decisions. The models that placed.....with various levels of great-to-flawless build qualities, did not have the above mentioned anomalies. I recall that your "best-of", at the very least, made it into the top 10 of the split. Perhaps even into the top 6. I hope this is helpful towards future building for contests. As always, we can build for the fun of it too, in-between the contest stuff. Thank you for participating in the National Convention Contest and for allowing me and the others to see your work.
    1 point
  46. Just FYI for future conventions, on Saturday morning there was a judging team available to give you feedback on your models. They would not have compared them to any other models and would not have know what the actual judges of your models saw, but they could have given general feedback from a judging point of view.
    1 point
  47. You'll get a different answer probably from each individual, as tastes and sensibilities vary individually. The only entries to truly worry about are those that border on violating Rule 5; those that border on "obscenity", and are basically pruriently sexual in nature. While they do not offend me, the problem is that IPMSUSA is deemed a "family" organization and thus there's the real possibility of others, especially kids, being exposed to graphic works that do not represent IPMSUSA nor the vast majority of our model building members. As for general items in scenes or on bases that anyone MIGHT take exception to; it's an unfortunate reality that in today's society too many people think that just because THEY are offended, others have to cow-tow to their feelings. For any and all such examples that you cited above, and that do not concern Rule 5, I'd simply tell the individual if you don't like what you see, move on and stop looking at it! Gil
    1 point
  48. Got it from Cabela's, 6 spools, 0.1 to 0.35, should last you a lifetime, and it's priced just a bit over $20. https://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=744541&type=product&WT.z_btnclk=YMAL-744541&WT.z_pg_ref=prd744646 Happy modelling!
    1 point
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