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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/25/2021 in Posts

  1. I purchased both of these kits from a vendor at our clubs annual invitational. Both kits are from Meng. This was my first time building Meng kits, and I must tell you, they were a joy to build. I was very impressed with the level of detail, and how well everything fit together. The base was covered with Stucco repair from Lowe’s. While it was still wet, I pressed the tracks, and mine roller wheels into the mixture. I painted the base with several shades of brown, and sand. Once dry, I applied a wash of Tamiya brown, and black. After it dried, I dry brushed Naples yellow hue for highlights. While trying to simulate the nonslip surface on the top of the turret and hull, I ran into some issues. After talking with some of the armor experts in our club, they pointed me in the right direction. Chris
    7 points
  2. I can't wait till is over! 🙂
    6 points
  3. I finished this baby January 2, after staring it in... 2002? It's a Hasegawa/Mister Kit mashup in 1:72 to depict a Serie VIII Macchi-built machine; the cockpit is Mister Kit and True Details resin with a Pavla seat with Eduard belts, and the wheel wells are mostly scratch-built. Mister Kit's photoetched gear doors were a pain to work with but ended up looking good. Missing details inside and outside the radiator were made with mesh, styrene strip and sheet and a lot of patience. The plane was painted with True North Africa mustard and light grey (matches for the Italian colors) and the camouflage was made with Mike Grant's "smoke ring" decals, which performed great (although they can be fragile). The markings for "Dai Banana!" came from a Sky Decals sheet and they were more persnickety than the smoke rings - Solvaset was my friend. The real secret weapon was the Valiant Wings monograph on the C.202, which answered many questions (questions that led it to go to the Shelf of Doom, perhaps?).
    5 points
  4. I wanted to see if I could build a broken relic into something presentable. I learned about the P-38 when I build this kit as a child and I would fly it around outside shooting down me109s and what have you. The copy I had at that time was molded in glossy OD plastic. I decided to find a copy and I did. I found some busted up kits for sale on eBay. The P-38 was one of them and is molded in metallic blue. It was missing the tail plane, props and spinners and balance weights. I asked for parts from the club membership and a member sent me a complete Monogram P-38 kit for parts. So here are photos showing the progress. It is one of Aurora's more accurate 1/48 models and I wanted a simple stand build; but, there was lots and lots of sanding and filling. To my surprise the Monogram replacement parts fit perfectly. I carefully removed the yellowed canopy and polished it. There is no cockpit just a molded on pilot, and rudimentary instrument panel and radio. The canopy is more like a helmet in that it sits atop the cockpit and is oversized. The only thing I could do at this point was adding putty and sanding down the sides so that it fitted properly. I glued the canopy with clear Gorilla Glue and it made a good bond without crazing the plastic. The clear canopy is missing some frame lines so I used decal strips to create those missing frames. None of the intakes are open so I just used a large sharpie to paint them black. I painted the model with Tamiya Green Drab and Mission Models Neutral Gray. The markings are from an Aeromaster sheet on OD P-38s. The props are held in place with blue-tac putty. Thanks for looking. 12 additional images. Click to enlarge.
    5 points
  5. Good luck with that. Some don't even bother to read the category cards on the tables!
    5 points
  6. 11 completions this past year, about average for me. I'll run them in chronological order. Fuel tanker and Cushman trike from the Airfix 1/72 USAAF Bomber Support Set, done as post-war civvie vehicles: Airfix 1/48 Gloster Meteor F.8: Classic Airframes 1/48 Grumman Widgeon: Airfix 1/48 Spitfire XVIII (converted from the XIV kit): Airfix 1/48 Spitfire Vb: Airfix 1/72 MBB Bo105: Airfix 1/72 Lynx HAS.2: Airfix 1/72 Lynx AH.1: Revell 1/72 F-4EJ, the very basic 1965 kit! SBS Resin 1/72 Farman F.190: Tamiya 1/48 Mosquito NF.XIX, converted from the NF.XIII kit: A pleasing year, I was pretty happy with most of these completions. We'll see what 2022 brings, but I have a number of interesting builds planned. Let's see what transpires!
    5 points
  7. Latest from the CDC on the Delta variant. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated.html I plan on wearing a mask. Not as a political statement, but for the same reason I would wear a bandage if I had a cut. I am 71 and fully vaccinated, but prudent use of any health aid where there is a risk of severe illness or injury is common sense.
    5 points
  8. I strayed a bit from simple on this one, inspired by a really nice build of the Lindberg XFY-1 given to me by a friend who has Gone West. I built up a cockpit using some Monogram F-80 parts and a PE instrument panel for which I can't remember the source. The intakes were given some internal trunking and the belly was extensively reshaped as Aurora got that pretty wrong and it is an interesting part of the airplane. A new canopy was made so I could pose it open. Some of the casters were missing so I made some resin replacements and posed them in a more realistic fashion. Work was complicated by the fact that the kit came to me as a glue bomb and the first step was to get it apart without destroying it. Later I found an unstarted kit but what would be the fun in that? It rests in the stash.
    4 points
  9. I've had this 1/48 Missing Link resin conversion for the Monogram Me-262A for decades to turn it into an Me-262B, and finally decided to build it! The conversion is simple and straight forward, only requiring the cutting down of the kit spine and the addition of the rear seater's cockpit tub. A very nice extended vacuform canopy is included, the nose radar "C" arms, as well as the seat and details for the rear cockpit. All in all, with the exception of drilling the radar arms to accept very fine wire radar antennas, this is an easy conversion. The only other thing worth mentioning is I tried a new technique for the side splotches. Instead of fighting with my airbrush, I cut VERY small swatches of sponge, held them with tweezers, dipped them into paint, blotted them off on a paper towel, and then DABBED the splotches onto the model. I was quite pleased with the result and it was MUCH easier than trying to spray them on! The model was rescribed and a brown sludge-wash applied. The markings are all from the Monogram kit, except for the black fuselage crosses. I didn't have ANY decals small enough to fit, so I made a stencil and sprayed the black crosses onto the sides. Anyway, happy to have this one built after it's sat in the stash since the 80s! Comments, critiques, and questions welcome, as always. Cheers! GIL
    4 points
  10. Plugging away on my Lockheed collection, I found that I lacked a P-80A. While researching the build, I found that the Sword P-80A/B kit had a definite error that needed correction. For that whole story (and cure), the build thread is over on BritModeler HERE For those just mildly curious, here are the pics: Thanks for looking, Ed
    4 points
  11. Finished this one late last year- cheers Pig
    4 points
  12. This is John Dennett's newest offering. IIRC it's from The Outer Limits' very first show. The story is about a radio station operator that seemingly contacts his counterpart from the Andromeda Galaxy (ignore the science). Wanting to impress his girlfriend about the stations range, he boosts the signal all the way up, and accidentally sucks the alien, who's made of electricity, into this world! The kit is John's usual 2 part bust - the figure and the base. It's done in flawless blue gray resin. For a lot of my character busts I give my self the dilemma of do I paint it as if it were real? Or do I do it as an actor in costume? Since I discovered how the effect was done. I decided to paint the actor, who was William Douglas. For those that don't know the effect, they dressed Douglas in a brown wet suit because of the B&W film. Then they smeared the suit with oil, and when developing, made a negative of the being. So this turns to be the easiest paint job I ever did. Brown suit, and all I had to remember that was in going to try the trick, light had to be dark and vice versa. Painting the other parts I didn't know what different hues would do so I kept all the colors in the brown family. After the below pic was taken I coated the whole thing in Spaz Stix Super Gloss. Then with the image viewer I have - Irfanview - I first made the image B&W, and then made it a negative. I also tweaked the Brightness, Contrast, Gamma Correct, and Saturation. It gave me a result I was happy with, looking like the alien on the show. Thanks for looking.
    4 points
  13. Hello. This is my last model Wedell Williams 45 National Air Racers 1934, from scratch in 1/32 scale. Best regars Marcin IPMS Polska 🙂
    4 points
  14. Well done, sir, well done. Now get you to the contest table, and tell the judges, let the PE be an inch thick, to this finish it must come; make them laugh at that seat belt.
    4 points
  15. For Highlamder: Alas poor OOB! I knew him well, David. A category of infinite problems, of most excellent confusion It hath borne me on the contest table a thousand times; and now, How grand in my imagination it is. Apologies to Sir William Pat D
    4 points
  16. David, you mentioned about local hobby shops being passive in the face of ecommerce. They face the same problems as any other retail business. Rents and business rates and taxes ever increasing, Cost of any salaries that have to come out of the business. Buying in stock and waiting for it to sell at a reasonable profit to sustain the business with potential customers often just window shopping, getting straight onto their smart phones to compare on line prices, and ordering from some big warehouse operation instead. Not all small outfits can afford to set up ecommerce themselves as the on costs of having to pay for IT expertise to design and set up a website and maintain it, as well as their own input to keep it always up to date. Are they really passive, or just being steam rolled into giving up against relentless pressure by on line giants and modellers going for the cheaper deals they can get on line? I for one miss a number of local hobby shops disappearing, being able to browse and occasionally meet up with like minded folk in the shop, and owners who were model makers in their own right with their expertise.
    4 points
  17. He ruthlessly seized power in “ The Night of the Bloody Xactoknives!” 😉😂 Anonymous (for fear I might be next to ‘disappear’ )
    4 points
  18. Just FYI for future conventions, on Saturday morning there was a judging team available to give you feedback on your models. They would not have compared them to any other models and would not have know what the actual judges of your models saw, but they could have given general feedback from a judging point of view.
    4 points
  19. Good to see the Eboard mixing with the crowd.... Gil
    4 points
  20. Finished my A-3B bomber this evening. Started with the CollectAire 1/48 resin EA-3B, so I had to saw off the plain tail and convert the backside by adding the gun stinger and rear radar bulge. The side door and windows had to be eliminated and the nose "sharpened" a bit too. This is one of CA's better, later edition kits with the wingfold option, dropped flaps and slats, and PE parts for the cockpit. I chose these markings (Caracal decals) to match the CA resin A-5A Viglante bomber (converted from the RA-5C) I'd built some years ago. And in-progress pics... Wing assembly test fitting Tail conversion work Side door and windows filled Engine assemblies The CA resin A-5A Viglante bomber that it matches... Comments, critiques, and questions welcome, as always! Cheers! Gil
    4 points
  21. I got this kit in a grab bag of kits I bought. It's from the 1956 molds and even had the pilot's head molded in halves integral to the fuselage sides. There are many inaccuracies and omissions, so to build it 'right' would be a real waste of time as there are now many other much better representations, including Airfix's own excellent re-tooled one. But I decided to do it just for fun, so I did it as a desk model and since it was to be in flight, I added the 'spinning' prop. I also rigged it, which was not called for in the instructions, and added the antenna, which you may notice is the wrong configuration, but since there were so many other 'problems' and it was simpler to do this way, I settled for it amongst all the other inaccuracies, which includes the markings. The kit's decals were useless, so I got some out of the spares box. They actually belong to a Hawker Fury of First Squadron, but hey, in for a penny in for a pound, inaccuracy-wise.
    4 points
  22. Not the easiest new tool Airfix kit to build but it's such a cool looking aircraft, I had to build it. I did end up using the Eduard Zoom set though.
    3 points
  23. 1/8 agora 427 cobra, Changed color to red. Comes blue with white stripes. Repainted wheels, rollbar and exhaust. Added a few little extra details. Repainted it red because Shelby’s comment to Enzo Ferrari was “ I can make red ones too”
    3 points
  24. I'm calling it close for this year's Christmas model. It's Bob Crachit from Christmas Carol sculpted by John Dennett's MoonDevil Studio. A typically nice kit in 1/5 scale. It's 2 parts of purplish resin - the bust and the base. As with the Scrooge bust from a few years ago, it's based on the 1951 film. Since the film was done in B&W, I had to look fro movies posters to see how the characters were imagined. I found two images of Bob - one with a blue tie/scarf, and one with red. Thinking there's nothing Christmas-sy about blue, I went with the red one. Plus the red tie sort of ties in with Scrooge's red scarf. As usual I started off with the face. All images show him fair skinned with dark hair so here we go. Besides the red tie, I'm planning for a white shirt, green vest and a brown jacket, with hopefully some texture on it to make it look tweed. We'll see about that. But that's for next time. I started out this session by painting the hair. On TV it shows up very dark. I hit it with the darkest brown I had, Then highlighted it when dry. Ugh. Too light. Then 3 coast of Citadel's Nuln Oil got it back to a decently dark color. For the clothes, I had the colors I wanted picked out - White shirt, red tie, green vest with brass button, and black piping, and then a brown jacket. It went along well. for the vest I added a little design in a light green and ten went a little lighter for the 2n'd highlight. The jacket I decided to make a tweed jacket. A dark brown was the base coat. A lighter brown stippled with one of my ruined brushes started the tweed look. Finally, I used V's English Uniform, which is a lighter brown but with a lot of green in it was stippled on and this gave me the tweed color I was used to seeing. Only problem was that it dried a satin. I found a bottle of Anti Shine that The Army Painter put out and it dulled the jacket down quite a bit. I'm still trying to get my clear coats straight. When I spray gloss, I want gloss. When I was matte - I want completely flat - not almost satin, not even egg shell. I want flat. Any discoveries will be reported. A simple gray stone base was painted with a white cut out and Bob's name in red. To finish it off, A let it snow on the base. Thanks for looking.
    3 points
  25. Last year iModeler member Tom Bebout sent me some classic kits with the request I would build them. I told him I would and here is the first one of them. It is an older Airfix kit with the original first issued in 1963 as kit 386. As I began to build it I soon began to like this pudgy little fat fellow. First thing I did was sand down the rivets and second thing was to figure out how to improve the clear parts. Common with Airfix kits with cabin window is that there is always a nice big sink mark in the middle of the clear piece. For the nose windows I used Microset Clear window glue which worked OK. On the side fuselage windows I sanded and polished out the parts hoping to remove the sink mark. It worked on some and others it didn't. To seal the side windows I experimented with two kinds of clear glue on the inside to prevent them from popping off. Unfortunately the interaction between the clear gorilla glue and the other clear glue caused some white specks on the windows. Lesson learned. Practice on a test kit before using it on a build. I masked the fuselage windows with a mask ordered off eBay. The canopy frames are thin strips of decal painted with the correct color. The paints are from Tamiya (sky), AK (Dark Earth) and Mission Models (green). I used blue tac to mask the camo pattern and it worked well. The decals were slightly out of register so I replace the roundels, codes and fin flash markings with decals from my spares binder. I flattened the finish with Dullcote. The motto on the side of fuselage is supposed to be on each side. I screwed up the starboard side ones so only the port side has them. The nose cap, lower clear part and turret are glued in place with clear Elmer's glue. Somewhere on the floor or on my bench is a small landing gear door that popped off, but is not noticeable. The next one will be the Monogram 1/48 TBF.
    3 points
  26. Started a new project- 1/35 Coast Guard MH-60T Jayhawk rescuing a Hornet pilot from the drink- here’s our poor Hornet driver the water base is a resin casting- the helo will be in a hover over the water- The red arrow shows where the clear mounting rod for the helo goes- cheers Pig
    3 points
  27. Here is Lindberg’s 1991 boxing of the Snark missile in 1/48. I must have weeks invested cutting off flash and filling seams. What a mess these old molds were. I was bound and determined to finish as my wife gave it to me for Christmas 2 years ago. The key goal here was to go to another level with lighting - EXPLOSIONS! The models are painted with MCW acrylic lacquer. Those are the 31yr old decals…they looked good until i put clear on the Snark ones, a few showed some silvering almost like they lifted a bit with the hot paint on them. The tractor, hitch and stairs were weathered with Flory washes and dry brushed with Vallejo metal colors. 220 grit sandpaper for the base. Lights are 24v COB LEDs at 6500K. 9ft of them! Blinding even from the living room lol had to use my sons New Google phone to capture the scene. Any other camera just showed bright glaring light all around. The streaming jet exhaust is compliments of synthetic ‘rope’ style cotton. That really sets off the appearance of flow I think. Here are my top 10 shots. Hope you guys enjoy them… And here’s a sneak peak underneath
    3 points
  28. Hello all! Awhile ago I posted pics of my Fokker F-27 Friendship with one propeller missing and called it done. Now I can finally say that it is done! Finished pics are here: Sweet! Now that looks so much better!
    3 points
  29. A new year, a new project is begun. I’m building Academy’s 1/35 M51 Sherman. For those not familiar with the type, this was probably the ultimate development of any Sherman. The Israelis started with 76mm gunned M4A1E8s, replaced the gas radial engine with a Cummins Diesel engine, then modified the turret to accept a French made 105mm main gun. These tanks saw combat in IDF hands in the 1967 and 1973 wars where they faced off against T-54/55s, T-62s, M47s/M48s, and Centurions among other types. And the upgunned Shermans were able to help win the battles. Anyways, this is Academy’s 90’s vintage kit that I’ll be building OOB, except for adding some stowage. Today I completed the first couple of steps, assembling the HVSS suspension, and adding the return rollers to the lower hull sides the biggest time killer was mold seam line clean up, and dinging up the idler and road wheel tires… Hopefully this should move along at a quick pace now…
    3 points
  30. This is the 1/32nd Williams Brother kit with some figures from, Nemrod, Miniart, and Stalingrad. The kit has been setting on my shelf for at least 21 years. Dak
    3 points
  31. To research — to buy. To build — perchance to enter: ay, there’s the rub! For in that toil of construct, what dreams may come When we have shuffled off to the Nats, BKB must give us pause. Hey, this is fun. It is so fun, I demand a Shakespearean category ... which will have a BKB option. One can enter Shakespeare's original remains as BKB ... or embellish them with shrouds and pointy shoes and pen and quill, resin or PE ... as a regular entry. If you add Anne Hathaway, then it's a vignette. Include the Globe and its a diorama.
    3 points
  32. With all due respect I think if more IPMS members READ the rules carefully and the preamble to the rules defining BKB much of this self-inflicted confusion and frustration would go away. The rules are written in the King's English and are pretty cut and dried, trying to parse the meaning and find loopholes that are not there is a waste of time. If anything, the new BKB rules are much clearer than the OOB rules ever were. Basically, if it ain't there or on the instruction sheet you can't add it. Provisions were made for certain cases like some armor or motorcycle models where non-plastic media is used to support the structure or are needed to assemble it (screws & bolts, metal chassis). No offence intended to anyone, but this is not that hard to build and compete within these rules if one desires to do so. Pat D
    3 points
  33. The way things usually go, only 200 would vote, and if approved there'd still be howls of outrage at Omaha that it wasn't advertised enough by the same guys who CAN'T BE BOTHERED TO VOTE! 4000 members, 500 votes for officers, or roughly 12.5% ... which isn't enough to pass an amendment under the old CBL. (10% now)
    3 points
  34. Today was a paint session on the stowage items base colors. Almost four hours using most of my enamel Olive Drabs, Olive Greens, Khakis, and most everything in between to paint the items. The beautiful thing about using enamels over acrylics is that any enamel mess ups onto the base acrylic IDF Sand are easily cleaned up with paint thinner. Tomorrow I need to work on the road wheel tires and the exhausts.
    3 points
  35. My position is, a model kit which contains PE, resin, cast or turned metal, 3D printed, and/or other material parts for which there are analogous parts in the majority material of the kit, the kit MAY be entered in a BKB category if ONLY the analogous parts are used. If there are NO corresponding analogous parts, the kit may not be entered in a BKB category. Choosing to enter a kit in a BKB category is up to the individual Example: If your battleship kit comes with both plastic main gun barrels and turned gun barrels and you choose to assemble the kit using the plastic gun barrels it may be entered in BKB category. If you choose to use the turned barrels or the kit does not contain plastic barrels it may not be entered in BKB. Providing a copy of the instructions is still a requirement for BKB. Your attention is directed to the next to the last paragraph in section III.1 "All Class Head Judges and the Chief Judge will have final say as to what is permitted for any BKB entries within their Classes." Ed Grune NCC Head Ship Judge
    3 points
  36. Looking for kits to start the year (besides the Skystreak) I found Mark Warthling's Pestilence Labs Monster from Young Frankenstein, and John Dennett's Tiny Tim. I guess I want to get a head start of next Christmas. But he's for a separate post. First thing to decide is what color was the Monster. Fortunately the movie being filmed B&W on purpose, and there were plenty of color images available. Where the box are shows a blue-green. He's definitely a blue. One dilemma I always have for myself is should I paint him up as if the character is real, or as an actor in makeup. I usually go for the former, but this time I went for the later. I got out my flesh triad and went to work. The blue went over the skin tones. I actually muffed up at this point putting too much blue on, and eliminating all the skin tone. I tried to save it my using my lightest skin ton as the highlight. Worked fairly well. Then it was time to paint up the clothes. His shirt was a black, and the jacket was a brown. The stone was was painted with 3 colors to add a little extra color to the model. The kit comes with a broken mug from his scene with the hermit. I was lucky enough to find this screen grab, as I thought I noticed a design on the mug while rewatching the movie. I tried my best to copy it. Almost done I tackled the fire, and is my typical fire recipe. Remember that fire has to be painted backwards from the usual Base color, shadow, highlight. The lightest (hottest) color appears closest to the source of fuel - his finger in this case. The last thing was his eyes. Looking up Peter Boyle's eyes, according to a few statistic websites, I was surprised to find out that his eye color is black! Having a pupil show up against that would be a problem. So I made the irises a dark gray. I also chose the eyes down as if he's pondering *whats happening to my thumb* look. A little gloss over the eyes, and I was done. Thanks for looking.
    3 points
  37. To expand on Ron's comment, these centers often rely on room bookings and food sales to underwrite the Convention space. IPMS doesn't offer the "density" to be affordable for most convention centers to be interested in our business. We aren't profitable enough for them to care, especially in the first tier market, and often in the second tier market as well. Most members are unaware that the annual budget for the Nationals is well in excess of $100K when the "hidden" costs are broken out. Omaha is unusual in that the center was built in the middle of nowhere (if you went to the 2011 show, you'll remember the only thing nearby was the Cabellas! The area has since been developed.) And the attached hotels are actually too small for our needs. Other conventions have had to deal with the attached hotels not offering enough rooms at the show rate, forcing attendees to stay at other places, thus the host chapter looses those room nights raising their hosting costs. IPMS manages to sell out multiple room blocks every year, so we are lucky that way. A third factor is the infamous "cheap bastard syndrome": there are guys who will stay at the cheapest possible hotel, often across town, just to save money for the vendor room and complain about the drug deals in the hotel parking lots. Las Vegas was a bonanza for them. Not only did they not help the host chapter by staying in the Rio nor registering for the show, rather there were suddenly lots of new "cousins" buying the family GA week pass, at least while I was at the GA desk on Wednesday and Thursday. Omaha needs to be aware that there will be many similar "cousins" trying to get the $15 family pass. Define what a family is on the signage. The fourth factor is the food. These centers have "restaurants" which rely on weekend food sales to provide the profit margins of the entire convention center. The $50+ rubber chicken dinner doesn't go over well with most of the members wo go. We don't know what the banquet cost will be this summer, but people that drive to the show often begin their drive back other vendor room winds down, especially if they haven't entered anything in the contest. All of this needs to be considered by any group looking to place a bid. It isn't as easy as Micky & Judy made it look in their movies.
    3 points
  38. So I neglected to add my last few updates here… Firts up, I built the kit crew figures. I love the poses on these guys, very natural then I started priming… not realizing that I had forgotten to add stowage. So I stopped the priming, let it dry, selected some stowage items from my spares collections and epoxied it all in place then the next day I finished up the priming next up, base colors…
    3 points
  39. Last time I built a F-105G, I was in the 7th/8th grade. No paint, or decal, just good old Testors tube glue. Had a blast. Decided to add lights and sound. Went on YouTube, and found “F-105D startup”. I’m using a Bose Soundlink for a speaker. Going to build a jet blast wall to put it in, The lighting is the same kind I used to light up the inside of the Sherman. Hobby Lobby carries these mini LED light sets. They have a portion of a row devoted to different sets of these. Easy to use, and really cheap.
    3 points
  40. I was ready to call this finished the other day. I took pics and when uploading the to my PC there was something missing. I never added in her eyebrows. I went up to my hobby room, and I gotta be honest and say those two thin lines were the scariest paint stokes for me to date. The model show the scantest line where they go, and even when I drew them in with pencil first - it was still nerve wracking. Whew she's done, and this completes my BPMS Pledge for 2021. Thanks for looking. https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-E-7-_2qqQ1c/YY07ucxoHGI/AAAAAAAAGrc
    3 points
  41. Built this one for a co-worker who crewed P-3s in the Navy. Built OOTB; but I did have to make the bat tail art and paint the wing walks since the old kit decals were pretty well shot and I could find no aftermarket decals for VP-24. Now on to that 1/32 B-17E! GIL
    3 points
  42. Got some more work done in the Radio room and the bomb bay....... Radio room side walls...doesn't look like that much, but it involves more than 30 PE parts... A few door doo-dads added to the bulkheads... Bomb bay side walls,,,unpainted so the parts can be seen before they're blended in... Bomb Bay doors and the center bay brace.... Not sure how much will be seen, but it's being added! GIL
    3 points
  43. When I started building this kit I decided to re-scribe the model and it went well for a while. As I progressed AMS got hold of me because I felt some of the panel lines weren't perfect and so I put it away. Then one day I just said phooey to AMS and started building as is. So here is the A-20 out of the box that AMS caused so much anxiety.
    3 points
  44. No.....as usual, you ignore everyone's answer that what YOU think is important, is not; and continue to argue the point. You've had at least 2 (or more) national judges with over 20yrs experience tell you that your example is just a part of judging, and we cannot always tell which way to go, or catch everything, or always be right. When YOU judge, feel free to try to solve this dilemma in a way that satisfies you, as none of us can do so. Gil
    3 points
  45. This is the Airfix Do217 first issued in 1960. It is built as the instructions indicated and I also used the paints recommended by Airfix. The hardest part was masking the nose which I did one frame at a time. The landing gear is missing support structs and should be added. I did sand all surface detail and did some minor scribing. I also used the kit decals. So here she is built just as Airfix indicated in the instructions.
    3 points
  46. I'm sure that you've all heard the phrase "my eyes are bigger than my stomach"? Meaning don't bite off more than you can chew. I've always been intrigued by dioramas. The stories that they tell can be awesome. I've always felt that the best aspect of a good diorama is one that each new time that you look at it you find some new hidden detail that you missed the previous time. I finally decided, a few years back, that I was going to build my first diorama. Being a car guy it almost made sense that I would do a garage with vehicles, tools, supplies, etc. I also like nature so I wanted to incorporate some added outdoors scene as well. So, one thing led to another and the next thing you know my design is way out of control and taking up a tremendous amount of space. It was fun but finding somewhere to store it/display it when it was done was no easy task. I also only took this to one contest after it was done because of the size and weight. Here it is. I framed the garage completely out of wood. Removable roof, real shingles, opening garage door and as much detail as I could throw at it without it becoming too busy. It was great learning experience that mainly taught me that if I ever did any more dioramas, (which I have) to keep the size in check.
    3 points
  47. This, right here. Regardless of what they represent(ed), they are an important part of history. Important as a reminder of what evil really is, and of the memories of all who fought against that evil. Rewriting history and tearing down statues really pisses me off.
    3 points
  48. I made this small diorama/vignette with figures from Master Box and sunflowers from Fredericus Rex. The figures are made right out of the box. I did add a Tamiya figure and an resin figure, those are the guys in the background deep in the sunflowers. The MB figures are very well cast with clean crisp detail. The sunflower kits are laser cut paper and are a bit tricky and time consuming, but I like the results. Each packet makes 14 flowers, I used three, I wanted the sunflower field dense like the reference photo. The base is a piece of foam board laminated to a thick styrene sheet covered with spackle and static grass and grass tufts. The figures and the flowers are painted with a mix of Tamiya, Vallejo model colors and a bit of artist gouache. Gouache is an opaque watercolor that dries with a super flat finish, it also mixes well with model acrylics and can really punch up the colors. The photo of the abandon BT-7 in the sunflower field was the inspiration for this project. Dennis
    3 points
  49. You'll get a different answer probably from each individual, as tastes and sensibilities vary individually. The only entries to truly worry about are those that border on violating Rule 5; those that border on "obscenity", and are basically pruriently sexual in nature. While they do not offend me, the problem is that IPMSUSA is deemed a "family" organization and thus there's the real possibility of others, especially kids, being exposed to graphic works that do not represent IPMSUSA nor the vast majority of our model building members. As for general items in scenes or on bases that anyone MIGHT take exception to; it's an unfortunate reality that in today's society too many people think that just because THEY are offended, others have to cow-tow to their feelings. For any and all such examples that you cited above, and that do not concern Rule 5, I'd simply tell the individual if you don't like what you see, move on and stop looking at it! Gil
    3 points
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