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Ron Bell

IPMS/USA Executive Board
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Ron Bell last won the day on October 22

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About Ron Bell

  • Rank
    Acrylic Addict
  • Birthday 06/05/1948

Profile Information

  • FirstName
    Ron
  • LastName
    Bell
  • IPMS Number
    12907
  • Local Chapter
    Eddie Rickenbacker
  • City
    Columbus
  • State
    OH
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Columbus, Ohio
  • Interests
    Braille scale British armor, classic kits, just getting in to ships.

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  1. Contact John Heck at artdirector@ipmsusa.org. He's the guy that actually puts the mag together and I know he's always looking for material.
  2. Duke, keep it up and you'll need a semi to get your collection to the next nationals! That turret would make a cool diorama.
  3. Mike, Yes, white can be tricky. Only way I can get it right is that since white covers so poorly and you may have different colored things on your model such as fillers, PE parts or other colored plastic, to get one color that the white can cover, first apply a light grey primer, then a coat of FLAT white that covers the primer evenly. When that is set, if it is at all rough, go over it with either very fine sandpaper (600 grit or higher) or very fine steel wool being careful to avoid burning through the white. Gil Hodges has even been known to use a small piece of burlap as a buffer as it is soft yet has just the right amount of "grit". When you've removed any orange-peel, apply fine coats of gloss white until a nice even color is achieved. As painters say, keep a wet edge. If you apply gloss white over gloss white that has started to "skin" over, it won't mix with then paint already applied and will sit on top and may orange peel. Then leave it alone for at least a day so the top coat can set. It's a little involved, but does produce an even coat of white. You can use this same procedure for other "problem" colors such as red or yellow, just use the flat version of those colors for the coat between the primer and top coat.
  4. In keeping with their tradition of designing particularly ungainly aircraft, this was the British Army's heavy lift aircraft during the Cold War. Don't let the scale fool you. In 1/144 it has a 13 inch wingspan. That would be 26 inches in 1/72. A Halifax in that scale has a 15 inch wing span, so that gives you a point of comparison. It was a BIG aircraft. It could carry cargo and/or paratroopers. Google it and see how the troopers loaded and jumped. Weird, but it worked. The kit was typical MIkro Mir, a mix of nice molding, decent fit, but vague instructions as to what went where, especially when it came to the PE parts. It comes with a pretty detailed, at least for this scale, flight deck and cargo area. The rear clamshell doors have interior detail as does the fuselage, so if you can find some 1/144 scale British troops or vehicles, it could make a neat diorama. I was going to do mine buttoned up, so I just left all that out simplifying assembly greatly. The decals were just outstanding, being opaque, thin and tough. They settled down nicely. This was obviously going to be a tail sitter, so I made sure to have plenty of weight in the nose area, but even with that, it still settled on its hind end, so I had to make a prop for it out of an old clear plastic stand.
  5. This is pretty silly and I'm sure is just a typo, but is pretty ironic. Did anyone really read the title of this thread? Accuarcy? Made me giggle.
  6. Let's use armor as an example. A given judge may be an "expert" on the M-4 Sherman. He knows every nut and bolt on every variant and judges Shermans accordingly. However, he doesn't know squat about German tanks, so he can't/doesn't judge accuracy on them. Is it fair that the Sherman is judged for accuracy and the Panzer IV not? Our members build such a bewildering number of types and sub-types of variants of so many different subjects that we can't have judges that are experts on everything so that everything is judged the same, so to be fair, we shouldn't judge it until we're down to maybe the top few that are the same quality assembly-wise to try to pick the winner. At that point, judging teams will usually call in "so and so" because he "knows" the subject better than anyone on their own team to help with accuracy.
  7. Not many kits of this vehicle around, so I jumped on this when I found it. One tricky part was the car itself is done in two halves, front and back, making for a long seam all the way around the middle of the car. It filled in pretty well, but took some doing to make it "go away" as is always the case with seams on flat surfaces. Also, if you put the provided spring parts on the locators called out, the body winds up way too high. Removing the locators brings everything into alignment, Just noticed that I forgot to paint the search light lens. Oh well. Back to the work bench. Looks nice when done and fills a niche in my modern British vehicles collection.
  8. Excellent work. Just for comparison, here's the first model of this vehicle in 1/35/2 scale, the old Monogram one. What a difference 40 years makes.
  9. Nice idea, if you have a printer that could do that, which I don't. But thanks anyway.
  10. I have an Eindekker with no markings and can find no, I repeat, no, aftermarket early WWI Maltese cross decals in 1/48. I found 1/144, 1/72 even 1/24 and 1/32, but no 1/48. Anyone know of any or have a spare set from a kit? If not, this one goes back on the shelf unfinished.
  11. Not common place, but it there is no other way to tell one model's flaws from another, yes, it may happen. They are cautioned to use extreme care and use it as a last resort, but yes, they may do it. Remember, these are 3D representations of prototypes, so must be judged in the same dimensions.
  12. Collin. Your question would be best directed to the IPMS/USA Chief Judge, Mark Persichetti at NCC@ipmsusa.org . That way you will get the official answer instead of just opinions on this board.
  13. OK, its not a real TNH, but the Tamiya 1/48 Panzer 38(T). The tank was developed in Czechoslovakia just before the war started. As a matter of fact, it wasn't even in service yet when the conflict began, so this example is rather spurious in its markings. The Germans thought so much of the vehicle they modified them slightly and equipped whole armored divisions with them (Rommels 7th in France for one) right up to the Russian campaign. The 37mm gun was as good or better as that mounted on any German tank at the time (with the possible exception or the Mk IV, but that 75mm was a short barreled infantry support weapon and besides that there were very few of them, even in France.) the armor was comparable and it was very dependable. The camo is typical per-war Czech camo. The little flag on the turret is from my imagination. I can't find many photos of pre-war Czech armor in Czech service, but it seems logical they would have some sort of national markings on their vehicles. I did this one strictly OOTB. These 1/48 Tamiya kits are just a delight to build. Fit is excellent and detail is very good. Tjhe length and link tracks are nicely done, but can be fiddly to get right and you can see a couple of my problem areas if you look closely. If you're not an armor builder but wonder what all the fuss is about with armor models, give one of these 1/48 kits a try OOTB. I bet you'll have fun with it.
  14. I've had this one done for a while and just got around to rigging it. Usual out of the box with a minimum interior added. The decals were way gone and I didn't want to spend stupid money for new ones, so these are spurious markings I cobbled together and a paint scheme that is an amalgam of several I have seen. The rockets were used to shoot at zeppelins and observation balloons, but most sources cannot site where one was actually shot down with them.
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