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masking can o' peas

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One of the reasons my aircraft kits sit, either unfinished, or not even started, is that at some point I'm going to have to mask the canopy (makes me cringe just thinking about it). I suppose I could build them all shot up, then a nice canopy would be a moot point, but.... The biggest issue is that after a swim in the Future pool, my masking choices are automatically limited, or so I assume. I've tried tape of various types (including Tamiya), and my patience goes south rather quickly, particularly with some of the 'greenhouse' types. Trying to fit diecut masks isn't any fun either. The solution least taxing on my eyes and patience seems to be a liquid mask of one type or another, but the liquid masks I've used are all ammonia-based, and aren't Future/acrylic paint friendly. Is there a liquid mask out there that won't attack the Future? I'd like to attack the past to change the future, but that's a whole 'nother thread, and would be OT here.... Michael Vinson IPMS/Quad Cities

 

 

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One of the reasons my aircraft kits sit, either unfinished, or not even started, is that at some point I'm going to have to mask the canopy (makes me cringe just thinking about it). I suppose I could build them all shot up, then a nice canopy would be a moot point, but.... The biggest issue is that after a swim in the Future pool, my masking choices are automatically limited, or so I assume. I've tried tape of various types (including Tamiya), and my patience goes south rather quickly, particularly with some of the 'greenhouse' types. Trying to fit diecut masks isn't any fun either. The solution least taxing on my eyes and patience seems to be a liquid mask of one type or another, but the liquid masks I've used are all ammonia-based, and aren't Future/acrylic paint friendly. Is there a liquid mask out there that won't attack the Future? I'd like to attack the past to change the future, but that's a whole 'nother thread, and would be OT here.... Michael Vinson IPMS/Quad Cities

 

Take some Elmer's Glue, add a drop of two of food coloring, and you have a liquid mask that is water-soluble. Brush it on, but closely follow the outline since it can lift at the edges when you trim it to final shape.

 

You can use just plain Elmer's, but the food coloring makes it more visible than just the glue alone.

 

Ralph

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Thanks Ralph, I'll give it a shot. I thought I'd tried Elmer's at one time, but maybe not. The good thing about Elmer's is that it's dirt cheap too! Since it's a little on the runny side I guess I'll need to dab on a section, then hit it with a hair dryer. Time consuming maybe, but nowhere near as tedious as tape and trimming.

 

 

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I use a product from Hobbyco called Liquid Mask, and it seems to sit fine over Future. It does leave a slight cloudiness when lifted off after several days though. All I do then is get a sharpened Popsicle stick and scrape it off, then re-coat with another coat of Future.

 

Edit: Goo Gone also takes the film off; leaving my canopies clear and shiny. I apply with a Q-tip and wipe clean with a paper towel.

 

Hope this helps. Good luck.

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plain old cheap rubber cement

works like a charm will not harm anything

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plain old cheap rubber cement

works like a charm will not harm anything

 

I'm curious about this techique using a liquid product. How do you keep straight lines along the canopy frame? I've only used Tamiya tape and BMF.

 

Thanks,

Jesse

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By carefully and slowly applying a liquid mask it will flow up to the raised framing and stop. A small drop applied with a toothpick or small paintbrush will flow out quite a bit. You'll probably have to use a couple coats to ensure adequate coverage though. If you have very steady nerves you can use a new X-acto blade to lightly score around the edges of the 'panes', and this will provide a natural barrier for the liquid. This generally isn't necessary, but there are some vac-formed canopies that have almost no raised framing (you might be better off using precut masks for those if they're available). There are a number of liquid masks out there (Microscale, Liquitex, Ambroid E-Z Mask, Parma Int'l, and Elmer's white glue and rubber cement as mentioned above), and if you're not doing a dip in Future first, you can use any of them successfully. Be advised though, that by virtue of not being able to use them over Future, it also means you can't use them over any other acrylic either. Most are ammonia based, and will act as a stripper for the acrylic (hence the problem with the Future, and how do I know...?). If you paint with acrylics and want to use a liquid mask for something like a camo pattern, go for it, but be sure to lay down a light lacquer coat (liquid masks won't touch it) between colors. Hope that helps.

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plain old cheap rubber cement

works like a charm will not harm anything

 

You must use a different Rubber Cement that I have, since the one time I used it to mask a Future-dipped canopy I was left with a mess.

 

Ralph

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Ever since that was suggested I've been thinking the same thing.... As I recall, the rubber cement I remember from years gone by (AKA gorilla snot) had a real solvent smell to it, like toluene, MEK or something similar. I wonder though, if the canopy (or whatever) has a coat of Future on it, that could protect the plastic from the solvent? I could definitely see it working on a resin canopy though. I love experiments, so I'd be willing to give it a shot. But, relative to my original question, I really would like to find something that won't eat through Future. I wish I had some old crap can o' peas to experiment with. But unfortunately, that would one more thing to take me away from actual modeling, and that I don't need; I already have too many distractions (thre biggie at the moment is trying to find a job!).

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Michael,

While it isn't a canopy, I have had no problems masking off windshields. I dip the shiled in future and allow it to dry. I then use masking tape. I usually use the cheapest available. Right now it is Tartan that I believe I picked up at home depot. I spray the frame and have never had a blemish yet (knock on wood). There is the occasional seepage but I think that is more my paint mix than masking issues.

 

Mark

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One other thing to consider. Try masking different frames of the canopy at different steps. Don't mask the whole thing at once. For those pesky multi-frame canopies, mask all of the lateral frames and paint the canopy. When it is dry, remove the tape and then mask the longitudinal frames. Paint them and remove the masking. Obviously, you have a double paint thickness at the intersections but it really is not visible. I always first paint the interior color and then the exterior color so it is thicker at the intersections but still not a problem.

 

Liquid masking mediums are good for some uses but if you can paint a straight line with the masking medium, you should be able to hand paint the frames. :D I have never been that good.

 

 

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I tried painting canopy framing by hand once, witthout masking, and it was not pretty. Liquid masking is sweet stuff, as it just flows out real nice right up against the framing and stops (assuming you didn't drown it). Let it dry and the second coat goes on as well. As I said in the original post, it's not the application of liquid mask that gives me fits, it's the chemistry. I need to find one that's not hungry for Future (or any acrylic coating), as most are because they are ammonia based. If I didn't dip the canopies I wouldn't have an issue. Seems like another reason to bag aircraft/military kits and go with big resin figures. If I sold off my entire stash I could probably afford a resin figure or two, but the stress relief might be worth it. Anyone have any big resin figures they want to part with?

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DO NOT use Scotch Tape or any such product. There are forums out there were people are talking about using this product (standard gift wrapping tape) that I have read. It is claimed that because it is opaque, you can take a very sharp X-Acto knife and easily trim around the frame edges for a clean, crisp paint job. So, I tried it. BIG MISTAKE. It was hard to peel off, left marks on my clear areas, didn't wash up well and cost me major deductions at the contest. The canopys were Futured first, and that didn't make a difference. The scotch tape idea is a total bust.

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DO NOT use Scotch Tape or any such product. There are forums out there were people are talking about using this product (standard gift wrapping tape) that I have read. It is claimed that because it is opaque, you can take a very sharp X-Acto knife and easily trim around the frame edges for a clean, crisp paint job. So, I tried it. BIG MISTAKE. It was hard to peel off, left marks on my clear areas, didn't wash up well and cost me major deductions at the contest. The canopys were Futured first, and that didn't make a difference. The scotch tape idea is a total bust.

 

Until the advent of Parafilm, I used to use Scotch Tape exclusively to mask canopies. Whenever I was left with residual adhesive, I took a fresh piece of tape and used it to remove the adhesive. If you use enamels to paint with, you can use Goo Gone to remove the adhesive residue. Other than the residual adhesive, I never had problems with Scotch tape. I switched to Parafilm to avoid the adhesive residue issue. Oh, and I think you meant to say that it is translucent--Scotch tape certainly isn't opaque.

 

Since I switched to Tamiya tape, I haven't looked back. Great stuff....

 

Ralph

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If you use enamels to paint with, you can use Goo Gone to remove the adhesive residue. Other than the residual adhesive, I never had problems with Scotch tape. I switched to Parafilm to avoid the adhesive residue issue. Oh, and I think you meant to say that it is translucent--Scotch tape certainly isn't opaque.

 

Since I switched to Tamiya tape, I haven't looked back. Great stuff....

 

Ralph

 

Yes, translucent is the word I was looking for. I usually use Testor Acryl paints. I tried holding it under some warm running water to get the residue off, but that didn't help. I think if I would have tried to use fresh tape to lift up the residue it might also lift off the acrylic paint as well. I use Tamiya tape, too, but I have noticed that it can leave a very slight residue, depending on humidty, etc. Apart from the residue problem, I did find the Scotch tape method very good in terms of leaving me with crisp lines and I didnt' have a problem with any paint creep.

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Is there a liquid mask out there that won't attack the Future? I'd like to attack the past to change the future, but that's a whole 'nother thread, and would be OT here.... Michael Vinson IPMS/Quad Cities

 

 

Liquid masking film by Bob Dively model aircraft inc. is good to go on any cured surface including Future, I get mine at the LHS but here's the phone number for you 1-800-752-1650 extension 23..... took this of my bottle.

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while on the subject of masking does any one know how to use parafilm I have parafilm but I can't get it to work for me, also how does parma international liquid mask and micro mask differ I need to find the right stuff before I venture in to masking my canopy for my P61 Black widow I also have the mask kit for the model but don't how go about using it there are no proper instruction for appling it to the canopy I need help-thank you

Edited by Ronald

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Hi Ronald,

 

I don't use the liquid mask much at all, so I won't be able to help you there.

With regards to the Parafilm:

 

Cut a section off the roll about the size you're going to need for the part you're masking (ie: canopy)

Then pull the Parafilm both directions (horizontially & vertically). By stretching the film, you're activating the "stuff" that make it adhear to the surface.

Then with your fingers, press the Parafilm to the surface (canopy) and rub down with your finger getting a good seal. Be sure to rub into the seams (canpoy frames, etc)

Then with a NEW hobby knife, make fine cuts along the edges. This is the most difficult part - you have to ensure you get everything cut, and within the lines. When you pull up the parts covering the canopy frames, you need to make sure you don't pull up the film over the glass you're trying to cover.

It takes a little practice, but it works well.

 

I've gotten lazy, and now try to use the pre-cut masks whenever I can. They are a little more money, but make my life easier. With that said, when I can't find a set of masks, I still go back to my old stand-by - Parafilm!

 

Hope this helps!

Tim

 

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Back to Elmer's......also try adding a little drop of dishwashing fluid. Since Elmer's is water based, it has a high surface tension that can cause it to puddle or draw back from edges. The detergent breaks the surface tension and it stays where you put it.

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Hi Ronald,

 

I don't use the liquid mask much at all, so I won't be able to help you there.

With regards to the Parafilm:

 

Cut a section off the roll about the size you're going to need for the part you're masking (ie: canopy)

Then pull the Parafilm both directions (horizontially & vertically). By stretching the film, you're activating the "stuff" that make it adhear to the surface.

Then with your fingers, press the Parafilm to the surface (canopy) and rub down with your finger getting a good seal. Be sure to rub into the seams (canpoy frames, etc)

Then with a NEW hobby knife, make fine cuts along the edges. This is the most difficult part - you have to ensure you get everything cut, and within the lines. When you pull up the parts covering the canopy frames, you need to make sure you don't pull up the film over the glass you're trying to cover.

It takes a little practice, but it works well.

 

I've gotten lazy, and now try to use the pre-cut masks whenever I can. They are a little more money, but make my life easier. With that said, when I can't find a set of masks, I still go back to my old stand-by - Parafilm!

 

Hope this helps!

Tim

 

Ok thank's Tom

on the information on papafilm now for help on using the mask would you have any information on how to remove the mask and applying it the canopy-thank you

Ronald

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Ok thank's Tom

on the information on papafilm now for help on using the mask would you have any information on how to remove the mask and applying it the canopy-thank you

Ronald

 

No Problem Ron,

 

To remove the Parafilm, I usually take a pointed toothpick and gently scrape an edge of the film up then lift it with tweezers.

 

As far as the mask goes - I don't have a great deal of experience with that. The few times I have used it, I have done much of the same - started under an edge with either a toothpick, or a #11 blade, then picked the rest off with tweezers.

As far as putting it down to begin with (again, I don't use it that often) I have used a toothpick, or round wooden stick to apply. I usually "make a mess" with the liquid mask.... :smiley24:

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No Problem Ron,

 

To remove the Parafilm, I usually take a pointed toothpick and gently scrape an edge of the film up then lift it with tweezers.

 

As far as the mask goes - I don't have a great deal of experience with that. The few times I have used it, I have done much of the same - started under an edge with either a toothpick, or a #11 blade, then picked the rest off with tweezers.

As far as putting it down to begin with (again, I don't use it that often) I have used a toothpick, or round wooden stick to apply. I usually "make a mess" with the liquid mask.... :smiley24:

 

ok thank's Tim

I also had trouble with liquid mask I guess I will just stay with the tamiya tape or the blue tape from the hardwear store

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Liquid masking film by Bob Dively model aircraft inc. is good to go on any cured surface including Future, I get mine at the LHS but here's the phone number for you 1-800-752-1650 extension 23..... took this of my bottle.

In case anyone is interested - http://www.bobdivelymodels.com/4.htm

Edited by Michael658

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Have you tried the low-tack (blue label) Scotch Magic tape? Or drafting tape (if the stuff is still made)?

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