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A question about bases


Mike Lindsey
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What are the ramifications of attaching or not attaching your model to it's display base? Can it affect judging by whether it is attached or not? Which way do you guys do it? I'm just getting started in placing most of my models on bases after 40 plus years of not using them so any words of wisdom would be appreciated.

 

Thanks

Mike

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Mike,

I believe there is something in the rules for the IPMS National contest about kits attached to a base. I find at my local club contest it helps when judging armor, we can turn the kit around and view it from all angles without touching the kit. I've mounted some of my armor kits to bases. As to aircraft I don't think it's a problem to judge unless it has very little ground clearance. Some judges might think you're trying to hide a flaw.

My two cents,

Eric

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I believe there is something in the rules for the IPMS National contest about kits attached to a base.

From the National Contest Rules:

9. BASES/DIORAMAS. Bases will be allowed in all categories and will not be considered in the judging except in the Diorama classes. A base may be a piece of undecorated wood, plastic or glass or it may simulate the natural surface on which the prototype would be found; however, nothing other than that surface may be used.

The only thing really specified is the differentiation between a model on a base and a diorama. When I've judged at our annual show (we don't pick up models for judging, but may turn them for a better look) or at regionals, if it's not in a diorama category, I really don't pay attention to the base, as it's not being judged. The presence or absence of a base don't factor into my decision.

 

One thing I often see at shows is a note on some of the entry forms saying "Model is not attached to base." You don't want a judge to pick up the base for a closer look, only to have your masterpiece go sliding off, crashing back to the tabletop because it was only placed on the base, not firmly attached. :smiley19:

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As has been said, attaching a model to a base can save the model from handling by either judges and/or contest personnel if they have to re-arrange models on the table for space. But, as has also been stated, if you put it on a base and do not attach it, MAKE SURE you put a large, easy to see and read sign on the base itself, not the entry form, that the model is NOT attached. If you put it on the entry form, the "mover" may be reading it after your model has slipped off the base onto the floor.

 

As to judging, in Mil.Veh, it has no impact. We don't even look at it. Just be careful you don't cross the line into the vignettes and/or dioramas by adding too much "stuff" and/or figures. As to the other areas, i.e: aircraft, civ. veh, etc, I can't speak to how it would affect judging.

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As has been said, attaching a model to a base can save the model from handling by either judges and/or contest personnel if they have to re-arrange models on the table for space. But, as has also been stated, if you put it on a base and do not attach it, MAKE SURE you put a large, easy to see and read sign on the base itself, not the entry form, that the model is NOT attached. If you put it on the entry form, the "mover" may be reading it after your model has slipped off the base onto the floor.

 

You probably need a note if it is attached too, otherwise a judge may try to pick it up and find half the model in his hand and the landing gear, tires, etc. still glued to the base :smiley13:

 

I still get a chuckle remembering one of our local shows where someone entered a plane without enough nose-weight (or maybe it shifted in transit?) and they "fixed" it by gluing the nose wheel to the table. You can imagine how that turned out...

 

Don

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I still get a chuckle remembering one of our local shows where someone entered a plane without enough nose-weight (or maybe it shifted in transit?) and they "fixed" it by gluing the nose wheel to the table. You can imagine how that turned out...

 

Don

 

 

Now that's funny! Tragic but still funny. I prefer mounting my armor models to a base for several reasons. Once it's attached, I never have to handle it again. At contests, the model is protected if/when moved and it creates a "safe zone" around the model. I can visit friends and spend money with the vendors while reasonably assured the model is safe : )

Mark

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  • 2 weeks later...

My two cents.....

After reading both threads about bases, I have to say there is a place for bases. Putting an armored vehicle on a plain finished piece of wood just does not look right to me. However, those that want to show off undersides of vehicles, I understand the mirrored bases. The small ones used to show aircraft in flight (like Paul's thread) also make since. I understand the "putting it on a base to mimimize handling" theory but a model on a plain piece of wood just looks weird. If I could, I would place on my kits on appropriate ground covered bases just becasue it looks better.

 

Mark

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I like the idea of attaching the model to the base. Can be very helpful if you have a fragile nose gear and don't want to add any extra weight. One area where they can hinder you is in transporting them to the show. Depending on the size of the bases, you may not be able to pack as many in your box, etc.

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...someone entered a plane without enough nose-weight (or maybe it shifted in transit?) and they "fixed" it by gluing the nose wheel to the table.

 

Wow. I wouldn't have thought of that.

 

Isn't there also a judging disclaimer that they can't be held accountable for evaluating ventral details of models attached to the base. It kinda stands to reason...

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I vote NOT to attach the model to a base for the following reasons:

1) Easier transport; several simple bases can be carried separately in one box/bag.

2) Allows for use of simple bases (runways, tarmacs, parking stands, simple roadways, etc) on multiple models.

3) Allows models to be displayed on your shelving easier. They can be placed closer without bases and it also saves weight on the shelves, which is important for some display cases.

4) Allows for complete judging at contests.

 

The above reasons work for me, as I generally don't make a base for every model I build. There is no "rule" for this (except governing excessive size) and almost all judges can work around a model attached to a base in a fair and impartial manner. It does make for easier and safer handling in most cases.

 

In short, do what works for you in each model's situation! Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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