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SkyKing

IPMS/USA Member
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Everything posted by SkyKing

  1. Star Trek fans are more than likely familiar with these: The man behind them, Frank (Franz) Joseph Schnaubelt, moved from Chicago to California in 1941, where he applied for work at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft as a draftsman. The sample of work he submitted was a blueprint drawing of a single-engine airplane that happened to be the personal favorite plane of his interviewer. He was hired on the spot. He took a few classes at San Diego State College (aerodynamics, higher math, and engineering), but never attained a degree. FJ worked for General Dynamics for nearly 30 years as a design engineer, both in the aerodynamics and hydrodynamics divisions. His drawings of planes appeared as illustrations in the Collier's Encyclopedia. He was part of a team that built and flew a full-size reproduction of the A-1, the first military seaplane. (He also designed the logo for the A-1 program.) His biggest claim to fame was the design of the bomb pylons on the F-111 fighter plane, for which he was given an award by Convair for cutting costs without sacrificing quality. His services were loaned to other aircraft companies (such as Ryan) by Convair due to his expertise. FJ was laid off from General Dynamics in 1969, 3 years after receiving his 25-year pin, replaced by younger men with college degrees. He always referred to the event as "taking an early retirement," but it was not voluntary. In 1973, he decided to draw the Star Trek props and ships as an intellectual exercise. The rest is history. In 1974 and 1975, these works were published by Ballantine Books as the Booklet of General Ship's Plans (a.k.a. the Enterprise Blueprints) and the Star Fleet Technical Manual. FJ attended Star Trek conventions and book signings from 1975-1983, then withdrew from most public appearances to care for his wife, who was a homebound invalid due to advanced osteoporosis and multiple strokes. He always enjoyed meeting and corresponding with Star Trek fans, and when he did attend conventions, you could always find him in the hotel lobby or on the lounge chairs by the pool, deep in conversation with a cluster of fans, even at 2:00 or 3:00 a.m. FJ died on June 2, 1994 of sudden cardiac arrest. He was only a few weeks shy of his 80th birthday. He remained bright and active, and continued to live independently until the very end; indeed, he was a guest speaker at a local San Diego science fiction convention only a month before his death. The above is taken from a 1999 interview with his daughter, published at http://www.trekplace.com/fj-kdint01.html For more on Mr Schnaubel, see the interview and the following: http://www.trekplace.com/fj-fjwilliamsint01.html (1976 interview) http://www.trekplace.com/fj-fjnewittint01.html (1982 interview) And see here for high-resolution copies of the Franz Joseph blueprints, re-scanned at 400 dpi and cleaned up: https://www.cygnus-x1.net/links/lcars/star-trek-blueprints.php
  2. I have ordered Croco models on eBay. As far as I know, that’s the only way to get them. I had no issues, but that was before the current pandemic. By the way, the Mach 2 kit is injection molded, not vac-formed. I’m not aware of an Italeri 1/72 HH-43. Airmodel also issued a very basic 1-72 HH-43. Croco models are resin, if that makes a difference.
  3. I’m a native Texan, and I agree! I cancelled my room reservation earlier today. I’ll not be going.
  4. Those opposed to wearing masks should read this: https://apple.news/AlLlq9zRsSja2kQlPSBwOqw
  5. The number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in Texas, and the governor has not indicated any willingness to deal with the situation as long as there are hospital beds available. “Open for business as usual” seems to be the official policy. Hays County (San Marcos) is one of the hot spots. I’d have thought we’d have heard more from the host chapter and national officers at this point as to how they plan to deal with a worsening situation. As things stand now, I will not be attending and will be cancelling my hotel reservation.
  6. There were at least two different "Sage Greens" specified for USAF flight suits and jackets, identified as "USAF Shade 1509" and "USAF Shade 1511," with 1511 apparently being the predominant fabric color and 1509 the color of thread, anklets, wristlets (cuffs), collarettes. and the tape of the slide fastener, according to MIL-L-27546, the specification for Flyer's Jacket and Flyer's Trousers. So far, however, I have not been able to locate any specification or color chart for these "USAF Shade." I'd suggest starting with Green Drab FS 34086 and adding white until you get a faded green shade that matches a good color photo.
  7. And just today it was revealed that a coronavirus breakout had been discovered at the Amazon warehouse/fulfillment center in San Marcos. https://www.kxan.com/news/local/hays/multiple-employees-at-amazon-warehouse-in-san-marcos-test-positive-for-covid-19/
  8. https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11118.0
  9. Here is a great tutorial for us landlubbers or those new to ship modeling:
  10. I'd suggest you try True North. Their paint is an alkyd enamel. I have not tried it myself, but it has received some excellent reviews. https://www.truenorthpaints.com/
  11. Fusion 360 is a 3D CAD program from Autodesk and is free for non-commercial, hobbyist use. I know a gentleman using it to produce 1/72 models of prototype and proposed aircraft. The results are amazing.
  12. There are reports that Rustoleum ceased production of all Testors products today, May 7, 2020. Discontinuance of the Model Master, Pactra, and Aztek brands was previously announced on Testors’ Facebook page.
  13. Sounds like you might have too much paint on your brush. Are you familiar with the concept of "dry brushing"? This entails wetting the brush with a bit of paint, then removing most of it by wiping it on a paper towel or something else absorbent, until just enough paint is left on it to leave a bit of pigment. So first paint the radio black and allow it to dry. Then dry brush the raised detail with red paint. Or, do what some figure painters do. First paint the raised detail red, then carefully paint the body black. If the paint is thin enough, the black paint will flow around the raised detail, leaving it red. Colored pencils are another option for raised detail. There are pencils made just for this purpose, but sometimes the garden variety colored pencil will work. Is there an IPMS chapter or other model club in your vicinity? If so, join up! You'll be able to get plenty of useful advise on this and other techniques from other modelers.
  14. Particularly the 1:1 scale drawings for the different shapes of the vortex generators placed around the front and rear frames of the cockpit canopy, as well as any info on their placement. Thanks in advance.
  15. Is there any chance it could simply be postponed until next year? This what the Santa Fe Railway Historical & Modeling Society have done. Their 2020 convention, which was to have been held in Albuquerque in late June, will now be held there next year. I note too, that IPMS North Central Texas has cancelled ScaleFest, which was to have been June 6.
  16. Google “Starship Reliant” and you’ll find many sources of info. I have some bookmarked and will be glad to share them, but I’m not at my computer at the moment. Send me an email (to McMurtreyjames@twc.com) and I’ll get back to you tomorrow.
  17. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/california-vintage-neon-sign-photo-model
  18. I remember these very well. They were beautifully printed, but rather thick. I think they may have been silkscreened. Stoppel is still in business: http://www.stoppel-decals.dk/
  19. I’m looking for some ready-made, wall-mounted, glass-fronted display cabinets. Any ideas?
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