Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/26/2020 in Posts

  1. "Kuklinski's Principle of Appearance: A half-built scratch built kit impresses people with your skill; a completed scratch built kit looks just like any other model." I have included a picture of my in-progress scratch built 1/25 scale FWD P-2 crash fire truck. I have been working on this since March, 2020. The body is more of less complete, except for the battery compartment (the opening on the lower, center of the body). Everything is pretty much scratch built. It's about 16 inches long, 5 inches high and about 4 1/2 inches wide. The tires are resin from American Industrial Tr
    3 points
  2. Hi. My last racer, Polish PZL P6, made from scratch in 1/32 scale, from National Air Racers in Cleveland 1931 More on the topic here: https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/84035-pzl-p6-1931-from-scratch-scale-132/ Best regards, Marcin IPMS Polska
    3 points
  3. There's one other lesson I've learned over the years about buying model kits...... My very first Nats was in Atlanta in 1978. I didn't even know they had a vendors area and sold models! Talk about the gates of heaven opening up for me..... Anyway, I found a 1/48 Aurora SBC Helldiver...at that time the ONLY game in town for that subject in 1/48, AND Aurora was "out of production". The guy wanted EIGHT DOLLARS for it!! Now remember, this is 1978....you could still occasionally find Aurora stuff on the shelves in old hardware stores and dime stores for their original prices of anywhere
    3 points
  4. Hey everyone! Happy New Year and welcome to the new Grand Opening of Maddog Manufacturing for 2021. Most of which I'm going to show right off is work I did just before heading out on vacation back in December. Since it didn't get posted then, I'll be showing it here. So, all aboard the tram and remember to keep hands and feet inside at all times. Enjoy the tour! To start with, these are my most active projects currently going on right now: A lot of the work you see here has already been chronicled, but just before I left, I did some airbrushing
    2 points
  5. Finally, after many years, this is finished. I can say that there were not wo pieces in the entire build that fit together easily. And Trumpeter found ways to take one part and make four out of it. I will say it is a huge plane and I do love Navy schemes. Finished with Squadrons decals Dave
    2 points
  6. Nope, not that. Nor is it even pining for the fjords. It's a late business.
    2 points
  7. No no Squadron's not dead, it's, it's restin'!
    2 points
  8. The Stuka aircraft is just about done. After I finished the weathering, decals, and top coat done I detailed and painted the canopy frame and then installed the canopy. The antenna line inside the canopy was made with 32 AWG wire. The antenna line from tail to mast was done with some EZ-line. The aircraft was then set aside (more weathering to be applied once it is set on the base) . I then started on the portable generator for the display. For the engine I added the fuel line and ignition wires. The cable to hook up to the aircraft was part of the kit. I painted it German Gray and weath
    2 points
  9. I'm seeing varying posts, but no definite answer. The last post I saw said "change of ownership"....but who knows what that means, even if it's true? They had a %70 off sale last week, which is probably why the warehouse is empty. The problem now is how do they start back up IF there is a new owner and wants "Squadron" to continue"? The brand had lost so much of it's shine and reputation over the last 10yrs due to slip-shod service that I'm not sure the name has any value anymore. There was a time when both their brick&mortar stores and their mail order were THE place to go to if
    2 points
  10. Hah! Preposterous. Nothing is too expensive... As long as my wife doesn't find out. Actually, I like the way Pete frames his answer around relativity. Between a large stash, lots of reference material and aftermarket "stuff", I'm sure I've spent "too much". But my hobbies before modeling were drag racing, muscle cars (primarily 67-68 Camaros) and building (and rebuilding) race engines, transmissions and rear ends...and all the associated tools and space. When kids started to come along (4), I had to change hobbies. So the expense of modeling in (mostly) 1/35th scale, relati
    2 points
  11. 1/4 scale bust of Thulsa Doom by Kent Kidwell Dave
    2 points
  12. Vinyl kits. Don't like the fish Dave
    2 points
  13. Greetings, The launch of event pre-registration has been rescheduled February 1st to April 1st, 2021 to allow for the continued stabilization of the Covid-19 situation. We feel this postponement will allow for a greater confidence in those planning to attend The Very Best of the West National Convention. Convention planning continues to progress ahead of schedule, vendor table sales continue to be brisk with less than 30 tables (out of 320) left for sale, room reservations continue to come in and as of this date far exceed our original expectations (of 1,600 room nights) for a total
    2 points
  14. After discussion with Forum/IPMS leadership it has been decided that The Bull Pen section of the Members Forum will be deleted. This action is taken to keep our Forum in line with its stated purpose as well as the the purpose of the IPMS. Model on!
    2 points
  15. I’m calling this one finished. I built this as a quick project, with minor modifications, so as not to slow me down. I did not correct the rear suspension, which Academy molded as the A2 type, but then again, no one will see that on my display shelf. I painted in the 70’s era MASSTER scheme used in Europe by 7th Army units using Humbrol enamels. Markings are a mix of kit decals and decals from my decals drawer. I tried scratching up the antenna using telescoping brass to better replicate the tapered shape of those things, but it did not turn out as well as I wanted. Better luck next time I gue
    2 points
  16. The other alternative--one I favor, and one I've discussed on this forum before--is to limit out of box models to being just that--out of the box. Period. No added seat belts, rigging, spark plug wires, etc., unless it comes in the kit and is shown on the instruction sheet. Aftermarket decals should be allowed, but that's as far as it really should go. People then argue along the lines of "well, the model will seem to be lacking if I don't add seat belts" or "it won't be accurate if there are no railings" (that one still confuses me, since, last time I checked, accuracy was not a jud
    2 points
  17. Actually, more detail parts in a kit makes it HARDER to compete in contests, because there's more things you need to get right. Judge enough and you'll see plenty of anti-gravity photoetched seatbelts, resin sidewalls pulling away from the fuselage sides, and badly-cut vacuformed canopies. Detail parts give you more ways to screw up.
    2 points
  18. That's magnificent Dave! She's gorgeous!
    1 point
  19. Welcome from Oklahoma. What are your interests? This is my latest project. Dak
    1 point
  20. Actually, I do bother to look at what is being entered in these categories as I enter them and judge them. What kits are being entered is not the point. One of the most important reasons for creating OOB was to provide categories where perhaps more casual modelers feel they can compete successfully without having to do the major surgery or create out of raw materials the extra details often seen in the “standard” categories. While there may be an element of perception versus reality in this distinction in the minds of modelers, it is an important perception. IPMS contests have long been accuse
    1 point
  21. My girls got this for me Christmas. I lowered the ride height and modified the exhaust. The paint is Tamiya flat aluminum, the black is Testors gloss black acrylic, and several coats of Tamiya clear. Please excuse the paint I suck at airbrushing.
    1 point
  22. Where do I begin with this tale? Well, I bought it on clearance at the PX on our base when I was on deployment overseas in 2005. I never built it there, so I shipped it home to build at a later date. It is boxed as a F-35A JSF. Fast forward 2005, and I am now live no near Luke AFB and see F-35s flying overhead nearly every day, so I am inspired to build this. I open up the kit, start doing research, and see that this it is not a F-35 as it says on the box, but is instead a X-35. Or at least it is closer to a X-35A than to a F-35A. The basic airframe lines are the X-35, although it is missing s
    1 point
  23. Anigrand 1/144th scale Douglas C-74 Globemaster, 1501st ATW, Brookley AFB, AL, 1949. A really nice kit. Tamiya acryllics and Future floor wax. Kit decals. White metal landing gear from SAC....
    1 point
  24. Kapton is used as an electrical insulator. At one time, it was used for the insulation on aircraft-grade wiring. It is light, but is not able to withstand abrasions, and once scored it tended to split. One airplane I re-wired had wiring that looked like beads on a string... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapton The tape is available through Amazon and several other sources: https://www.amazon.com/Mil-Kapton-Tape-Polyimide-Yds/dp/B006ZFQNT6
    1 point
  25. Today’s progress report: So today I completed my intended goals for yesterday. I added instrument decals to the IP, RAF WWII type, rather than the WWI type that I had planned to use but were invisible because they needed to be applied over a white background. Then I drybrushed and touched up the seat And lastly, I touched up the inside colors. Next session I can install all the interior parts and close it all up.
    1 point
  26. I was an editor at Squadron/Signal Publications from early 1999 to early 2005, when Jerry Campbell dismissed me. I had good memories of Squadron Mail Order and the people who worked there. (While with Squadron/Signal, I helped proofread Mail Order's monthly flyers and annual catalog and helped with their semi-annual inventory.) I even ordered from them now and then. Most recently, I ordered two bottles of Vallejo paint from them last month, which arrived just days later in good order. I was aware of the problems Squadron has had in recent years, so the news of their apparent closing (temp
    1 point
  27. Registering also gets you the swag bag which day-trippers don't get. Pin, decal, brochures, etc. You may be able to buy the decal sheet from a resale vendor after the show for an additional 10 to 20 bucks.
    1 point
  28. One small update from yesterday’s work: I forgot to get a better shot to show the sidewall wood grain effort and now that the oil wash on the engine has dried and I do not need to worry about it staining my photo booth, here’s a photo of the engine
    1 point
  29. Thank you Chris. I did indeed have some interesting times in my service career. As I’m sure that you did as well. I may have done some things differently if given the chance to do them again, but I would not trade the experience of doing them for anything. I’m kinda funny about “thank you for your service” coming from a fellow army vet. It feels more like thanks for choosing to come along and be one of us. I remember taking turns learning to drive a 113 at Ft. Benning...
    1 point
  30. As folks have stated already, cost is a matter of personal perception. We had a member of IPMS/Flight 19 many years ago who would not, under any circumstances, purchase a kit if it retailed for over $20. It didn't matter if it was a kit of his favorite subject, $20 was his line in the sand, and that would usually include the paint he needed for the project, too. Meanwhile, another member would routinely spend at least $100 on any model he built--by the time you totaled up the cost of the kit (and the kits be built were usually at that same $20 point), the aftermarket (and remember, this was
    1 point
  31. Was giving this a little more thought. I suspect this concept of "It's to expensive" came from our parents. When we were little kids, we would ask them if they would buy us something and often as not they didn't refuse us they just said "It's to expensive" and moved on. They weren't saying is wasn't worth the asking price or they didn't have that much money. They were saying that they had other things that were more important to spend their limited dollars on. We all make these decisions but won't say I can't afford it. Saying it is too expensive is less embarrassing than saying if I buy
    1 point
  32. The sarcophagus was a lot of fun Dave
    1 point
  33. Last night I began construction. Actually though it was mostly just paint work. First I took a razor saw along the seat to give it some texture to suggest that of the wicker seats actually used. Once painted and with a wash it should look more the part. Then I painted up other cockpit components, and the interior of the fuselage halves. Just getting the base colors on for now. I’m not gonna use the kit pilot, so behind the seat is a glaring empty space. I searched thru my spares/salvaged parts and came up with a fuel tank to fill the void. It somewhat resem
    1 point
  34. I never said it was--I merely mentioned that modelers who want to game the OOB rules make that claim--they feel they "need" to include ignition harnesses or deck railings to make their model "accurate". And I also said that OOB, for an experienced modeler, is automatically a compromise, since the OOB rules box you in on what you can or cannot do to the model, where as the Open categories allow you freedom to do whatever you wish. Honestly, I can think on no plastic modeling organization that (officially) uses accuracy as a yard stick. Every now and then, I see a claim from IPMS folks a
    1 point
  35. That’s because they’re are essentially the same aircraft. The X-35A was built ready to be converted into the X-35B. The main engine already had the swivel nozzle. The doors were already installed for the lift fan. Once the X-35A flight test program was complete at Edwards, it went back to the Skunk Works at Palmdale, the lift fan was installed, and flight test commenced on the X-35B. Once that program was completed, the airframe was sent to the Smithsonian Museum.
    1 point
  36. I’ll lead off. Here is my build of the Testors boxing of the old Hawk V-1 kit, the worlds first “cruise missile”. Let’s have some photo fun now...
    1 point
  37. All Back at it. The Sherman that is going to be built as the "Fury" tank, came with the wrong type track. I've not built track by individual links before. After pulling up the You Tube video for these bad boys, I'm excited to get started. There was quite a bit of gear to paint for two tanks. The logs turned out better than I thought they would. The MRE boxes (Cardboard) were interesting to assemble. All of the crew-serve weapons were painted with Master Model Gun metal(lacquer, not enamel) After they dried, I dry brushed silver to accent wear. Had a lot of decals to apply to put on
    1 point
  38. You might try mini saw blades for your Exacto. They have very fine teeth and are very thin and come in all sorts of shapes. Several companies sell them. They usually come on something like a PE fret. They are not for the larger plugs you find on resin kits, but work well on flash and in tighter places. Here's some available from Micro Mark Tools.
    1 point
  39. Welcome to building resin kits! Unfortunately, there isn't any fast or easy way to remove flash which is the biggest gripe against resin kits. I would recommend using an Xacto knife with no. 11 blade to remove the larger chunks of flash, then move to jeweler's files to clean up the final configuration.
    1 point
  40. This year I completed a modest six builds. But I was not able to start building until mid March after getting my workbench set up in my new home, so that works out to one completion every month and a half or so. Of the six, only one was a mostly completed build from a previous year. All the rest were started here, save for one, which was barely started, and I had to go and fix stuff on that one. So here we go: 1, Monogram 1/48 A-7B 2, Tamiya 1/48 DAK Kübelwagen 3, Testors (Hawk) 1/48 V-1 - the rollover build started in another year 4, Heller 1/35 Cha
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. Oil wash on... Letting it dry so I can clean it up tomorrow
    1 point
  43. This is from the dual kit with the Char B1 bis. Before the accuracy police get started, I know it's a WW 2 version, and I know that there were many small and some large changes from the WW 1 versions and that this kit has been called to account for inaccuracies and it's very name has been questioned. However, in general, it looks more like an Ft-17 than anything else on my shelf and fills a hole in my WW 1 collection. I know there are other kits of it out there, but not any to which I have access, so this will have to do. That all being said, it's actually a nice little kit to build, if a bit
    1 point
  44. Yep! Out of the Box should be strictly OOB that includes any crappy decals and therefore just a pure test of model building, painting and decal application. So David I am 100 percent with you on that one! Like you, many modellers build 90 percent OOB and add extra details to enhance their models. At SMW Telford that is classed as kit detailed or something very similar. I would imagine the US Nationals has a similar class category for this. The IPMS UK competition rules can be downloaded from their website if you want to have a look and make any comparisons out of pure interes
    1 point
  45. We all have this projevts that put us in that frame of mind from time to time.
    1 point
  46. People who knowingly cheat don't care if the victory is "hollow". However, I do not automatically assume anyone is cheating. I am just making the point that the complexity of modern kits makes it extremely easy to change or add detail without being noticed. Also, models today are much easier to build as "correct" or as award winning models than those from the early days of OOB forty years ago. What is the point of OOB any longer? Originally, it was to give people a chance to compete without having to rebuild half a model just to be on even ground. Now days, that is no longer the issue. He
    1 point
  47. Another killer build there Joe! And, as always, your presentation is first class!
    1 point
  48. Most impressive. I still remember pumping gas into Mavericks as a kid. Great project and superb execution Dave
    1 point
  49. Al ( and all) I've been screaming this for the longest. But who am I? ;) Frequenting forums other than this one, You read time after time how these "kids" (I'm also a graying 58) bring their Gundam or Star wars starship to a local meeting only to be scoffed at. And what do they do? They go home and never come back. While Regionals and Nationals have a good mix of other than military kits from the young'uns, IMO the local level is where the problem is. The oldsters that sit there and discuss the 50th Bf-109 on the table to death and scoff at an A-Wing are the problem. Whether one thinks
    1 point
  50. Yes, I am fairly knowledgeable on modern US armor, having spent nearly thirty years of my life on various military vehicles. I often get bogged down trying to replicate details or idiosyncrasies of the actual vehicle I crewed. Building something not my lane helps me get through ruts. I don't care much about accuracy when I am building an X-wing or an F-15 for that matter. I don't care if someone builds an M1A2 in USMC markings, or if they paint it pink. I don't think someone needs to know the history of the craft they are building. If it interests them enough to build it, they might just
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...