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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/24/2022 in Posts

  1. I strayed a bit from simple on this one, inspired by a really nice build of the Lindberg XFY-1 given to me by a friend who has Gone West. I built up a cockpit using some Monogram F-80 parts and a PE instrument panel for which I can't remember the source. The intakes were given some internal trunking and the belly was extensively reshaped as Aurora got that pretty wrong and it is an interesting part of the airplane. A new canopy was made so I could pose it open. Some of the casters were missing so I made some resin replacements and posed them in a more realistic fashion. Work was complicated by the fact that the kit came to me as a glue bomb and the first step was to get it apart without destroying it. Later I found an unstarted kit but what would be the fun in that? It rests in the stash.
    4 points
  2. I've had this 1/48 Missing Link resin conversion for the Monogram Me-262A for decades to turn it into an Me-262B, and finally decided to build it! The conversion is simple and straight forward, only requiring the cutting down of the kit spine and the addition of the rear seater's cockpit tub. A very nice extended vacuform canopy is included, the nose radar "C" arms, as well as the seat and details for the rear cockpit. All in all, with the exception of drilling the radar arms to accept very fine wire radar antennas, this is an easy conversion. The only other thing worth mentioning is I tried a new technique for the side splotches. Instead of fighting with my airbrush, I cut VERY small swatches of sponge, held them with tweezers, dipped them into paint, blotted them off on a paper towel, and then DABBED the splotches onto the model. I was quite pleased with the result and it was MUCH easier than trying to spray them on! The model was rescribed and a brown sludge-wash applied. The markings are all from the Monogram kit, except for the black fuselage crosses. I didn't have ANY decals small enough to fit, so I made a stencil and sprayed the black crosses onto the sides. Anyway, happy to have this one built after it's sat in the stash since the 80s! Comments, critiques, and questions welcome, as always. Cheers! GIL
    4 points
  3. Not the easiest new tool Airfix kit to build but it's such a cool looking aircraft, I had to build it. I did end up using the Eduard Zoom set though.
    3 points
  4. Well they are plastic and have to be assembled! May 1st limited production run. They make me smile.
    2 points
  5. Here's the finished product. It has many flaws, but given what I started with, I think it looks pretty nice.
    2 points
  6. Judging is always subjective....to address your specific question; IF the "ragged" paint edge on the prop on the model was done to "scale", and looked like it was a case of "field Painting" (versus sloppy modeling), then it's not gigged. BUT, much of the time, whether it's THIS or (perhaps) an attempt to paint invasion stripes in a "realistic" sloppy manner, the modeler cannot pull it off in scale. A more experienced judge MIGHT know that in the ETO there was a shortage of tape and often planes were masked and painted with wet newspaper, making for sloppy edge lines and overspray. Also, they often had to buy "local" stocks of paint (for houses and cars) and thus they didn't wear on the airplanes as well as aviation grade paints, leading to ragged wear lines. BUT, a LOT of judges DON'T know that....and thus will chalk up those attempts to failed model painting. You pays your money and ya takes your chances! My advice (as always) is build it the way YOU want to for your shelf, look at winning anything as "gravy", and don't worry if the judges know less than you and don't give you the benefit of the doubt. Gil
    2 points
  7. Next up is an interesting subject. This is the 1/48 Brengun MQ-8B Fire Scout. This is a helicopter drone built by Northrop Grumman and is used by the U.S. Navy. It is typically deployed on FFG’s and LCS ships. The reason I chose this is I am a member of the International Plastic Modeler Society (IPMS). I belong to the Mckinstry Chapter and we have monthly meetings. Typically each month we have a theme. One of the upcoming themes is “Missiles and Drones”. I looked over the available model kits of drones and thought this would be a little different than the combat drones many are used to seeing. This kit is a full resin model. Resin models are cast in resin rather than injection molded styrene kits. There are fewer parts than a typical model and instead of trees the parts are attached to the base of the cast. Many of the smaller parts can be trimmed from the base using a hobby knife. The larger parts require a jeweler’s saw to cut off the base. Once I had all the parts trimmed I started assembly. Resin models do not use typical model glue. They require a CA glue for assembly. I assembled the fuselage, tail boom and nose. The fit was very good except for the bottom edge of the nose which required a little putty filler. The kit come with a sheet of photo etch for some of the smaller details like the antenna blades. I added the photo etch pieces and then sprayed the fuselage with light ghost gray. For the turret under the nose I mixed some Pearl EX pigments in the Tamiya smoke paint. The main lens and the bottom right lens were mixed with gold pigments. I used blue pigments for the bottom and right side lenses. The left side lens I use the green pigments. Once dry I added a final coat of the smoke paint. I noticed that the decal sheet did not include the laser warning labels on the turret. I made my own decal labels and applied them. For the final step on the turret I drilled the holes in the back of the mount so I can add the cables later when I mount it. I am now getting ready to apply the kit decals. The decal set comes with two schemes and I will be doing the HSM-35 “Magicians” scheme. Check out all the photos and details in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-mq-8b-fire-scout-drone/
    1 point
  8. Decided to go for an all metal finish.
    1 point
  9. Don't know about warts, as I can't see any. Looks like you achieved your goal with the Alclad. Congrats, and thanks for posting! Gil
    1 point
  10. I used Alclad 2 airframe aluminum along with Alclad gloss black primer. these are the latest pics
    1 point
  11. This model of a normally shiny car brought home a trophy from Seattle Recon 7 back in the late 80s. Ya never can tell what someone might like.
    1 point
  12. Tape it down and try to unwarp it with a hair dryer on low or medium. That should make it pliable to cool at the right shape. The worst outcome would be it is further ruined? Maybe a vac canopy replacement if all else fails?
    1 point
  13. Steps 3 & 4 now completed - bits added to upper hull, the upper and lower hulls glued together That’s enough for today….
    1 point
  14. So since my last update I’ve been slowly working on the Bearcat. First up I had to paint the wing walk and exhaust areas flat black, as I forgot to do so when I painted the anti glare area on the nose. Next I airbrushed on an overall coat of a satin light gray as a base for the NMF Then I airbrushed on a coat of Humbrol non buffing metal cote Aluminum It turned out a bit rougher than I though it would, but should look the part for faded weathered aluminum in the end. Next I airbrushed on a coat of Future for decals Then today I applied the decals. They are fairly simple- national insignia, squadron insignia, and plane in group ID letter The decals need another dose of decal set to snuggle into the panel lines, then another light Future coat before I can do a wash in the panel lines…
    1 point
  15. WOW! Don't see many of these kits built up.......even fewer built this good. GREAT JOB!
    1 point
  16. I’ve only been a judge one time at our local invitational. (Figures). If I saw a plane with the worn, chipped effect that was convincing, I wouldn’t disqualify it for that. That’s accuracy. Isn’t that what we modelers strive for? Every judge has one area that they are set in stone on. (Crisp/clean paint lines) Nothing wrong with that, but I would rather reward the modeler for a historic presentation rather than Disqualify them. That’s just my two cents. Chris.
    1 point
  17. That sure looks good Joe. Great job all around....
    1 point
  18. This is a model of Jim Lytle's Quad Al dragster from the mid 1960's that i just finished custom building. The model has (4) V1710 Allison air plane engines, I Chopped the Fiat body, Custom built chassis and drive train, Including some misc. parts from the Revell Tommy Ivo Showboat dragster & The Revell Mickey Thompson Challenger 1 salt flats race car. It has 96 exhaust pipes (3D printed 4 at a time from Shapeways). I saw the original car last year at a car show and it blew me away, So i had to recreate one for myself. There was a magazine article in the October 1965 Rod & Custom magazine that helped with the reference's in building this wild dragster. There are also some misc. articles on the web. I started the build in May 2021 and just finished today (January 30, 2022). I tried to wire & plumb it accordingly. Thanks for looking, Jr. Roberts
    1 point
  19. This is an out of the box build. I like machines that show their machinery. The kit was a collection of nice looking pieces that didn't quite fit together. Most every joint required "adjustment" of pins, pegs, tabs, and their variously shaped holes. One step has the builder trim the track adjusters. I did so, used the specified number of links - fewer would not mate up - and got sag that would look bad on a KV tank. The instructions did offer good illustrations, EXCEPT that the arrowed lines are too faint and hard to see, not eased by the squiggly path some lines take. Rearrange the steps to suit yourself, I think that following them in order would not work so well. But, here is the completed model. It does capture the look of the Caterpillar Sixty.
    1 point
  20. 1/8 agora 427 cobra, Changed color to red. Comes blue with white stripes. Repainted wheels, rollbar and exhaust. Added a few little extra details. Repainted it red because Shelby’s comment to Enzo Ferrari was “ I can make red ones too”
    1 point
  21. I have not posted anything in awhile so I thought I would post some pictures my recently completed pair of 1963 Indy Novi Roadsters in 1/43 scale. These are white metal 1/43 scale kits from SMTS that took a little more than a month to build. I added some detail here and there to each model. They were a lot of fun to build and I was really happy with the end result.
    1 point
  22. The '34 is almost done, just a few small chains to go. This will be on the train diorama. A really fun build. Once the gloss yellow plastic was tamed, the rest was excellent, especially the details (the hood's Ford logo, for example).
    1 point
  23. The final scene of the Tropical Tilly R4D-5 has the project completed. With the aircraft completed I then made the display base for the aircraft. Using an 18” diameter plaque I covered it using spackle. I laid out the ski pattern and the tail wheel pattern. Next I added the crew footprints and the sled trail from the cargo door to the edge. After the spackle dried I used the “snow” from the Scene-O-Rama kit and added some Jacquard Pearl Ex powered pigments. I used the Interference Blue color. Mixing this with the snow gave the snow a bluish sparkle effect. I then painted on top of the spackle with Liquitex gloss acrylic gel. This was done in sections so the snow could be sprinkled on the wet gel. Once cured, I sprayed a light coating of Vallejo gloss to seal the snow. The aircraft was then positioned and the base and using 10-minute epoxy, it was attached to the base. I then mixed the remainder of the snow I mixed previously into a small cup of the acrylic gel. This mixture was then applied with a toothpick to fill the small gaps between the skis and snow. I then used it to create the plowed snow around the wheels and snow on the wheels. The kit came with a photo etch boarding ladder. This was painted, attached to the aircraft, and then I made a trail of snow up the ladder and just inside the cargo doors. This interesting project is now complete. This has been a fun project. The extra work to the resin conversion kit was required because the resin kit is designed for the Monogram/Revell model and there are size differences with the Trumpeter version. The Trumpeter kit itself was good. The only negative is the interior bulkheads towards the front need to be trimmed down to fit inside the fuselage. Everything else fit very well. I did not use the kit decals so I cannot comment on their quality. The decals included with the conversion kit worked very well. I hope you all have enjoyed this “Hollywood” build. Happy Modeling! Check out all the photos and details from start to finish in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/build-log/1-48-r4d-5-tropical-tilly/
    1 point
  24. Well, she rolled off the assembly line two days ago. As far as I’m concerned, this kit is an excellent build. Designed very well. After the decals were applied, I did a pin wash over all the recessed detail. I wiped off the excess with mineral spirits. The base is 3/4” plywood. To simulate concrete, I cut up squares of 100 grit sandpaper, and attached them with contact cement. Once built, it was airbrushed with several shades of Tamiya gray, and tan. To add oil and grease stains, I splattered Tamiya accent colors with a large brush. I taped and sprayed Tamiya yellow and black to simulate the lines. I decided at the last moment to add an aircraft tug from Aerobonus. The remove before flight tags are from Eduard. I had to scratch build the optical covers for the GBU-24’s, and GBU-10’s. Chris
    1 point
  25. Very nicely done. I hate vacu-formed canopies as I can never get them cut correctly or fitted into place. Your's looks great. As to the "splotches", try using those tiny "foam on the end of a plastic stick" things (don't know what they call them). They come in a blister pack hanging around the other modeling supplies. They should be just about the right size you need and having them on the "stick" makes them easy to use. Or if you need larger, try the cosmetics section for eye make-up applicators.
    1 point
  26. Good conversation going on here. This will be really helpful for a bunch of us in deciding on builds and categories.
    1 point
  27. So, the definition of basic kit build is simply the way we used to build them in our youth.... well most of us. I guess examples of Basic Kit Builds are here: None have photo etch, resin parts, replacement canopies or even replacement decals or rigging. This one even has the original 40+ year old decals! This was from an original Matchbox boxing: This one again has the original 40+ year old decals: Granted, none of these would be contenders in a contest, but they are the epitome of Basic Kit Builds. The only difference between these and contenders is the skill of the builder in assembling them, painting them, weathering them and nothing else. It doesn't get any clearer than that! I can also see that if aftermarket decals are allowed, I can understand why, given the state of the Vampire decals. There is no fixing some of those ancient decals. And if someone says they are all old kits; well the Cheyenne was built very recently from a re-popped kit from Atlantis, very newly released in relative terms. I have more but I hope you all get the idea. These are examples of my building: only what's in the box. I always build Basic, and some of my models don't qualify for Basic Kit Build because the manufacturer added photo etch to the kit. I'm good with that.
    1 point
  28. Just in case you want to know the reason for the change in the rule, it is spelled out in the Rules: "Redefining/Renaming Out-of-the Box (OOB): Manufacturers now offer comprehensive model kits which include what used to be separately purchased after-market detailing accessories . In addition, numerous requests over the years to add after-market parts to a list of ‘allowable exceptions’ have acted to dilute the purpose of out-of-the-box categories which were intended to promote building basic kits. Starting with the 2022 national contest, the OOB categories (and the rules for them) have been renamed to Basic Kit Build (BKB), to better describe the intent for this competition classification – older or more basic kits, absent extra manufactured detailing parts."
    1 point
  29. Thank you Gil! It has been awhile hasn't it? Wow, the manufacturing plant has been humming along quite a bit! It feels great to have all this time to keep things going. It's time for another tour, the trams are waiting! All aboard! Starting in the Hangar again, you'll see that the Japanese OH-1 has finally got her markings on. This kit has been fighting me more than expected, but we're starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel: Not much more to do on that one. Since decals were being applied, the AH-56 Cheyenne got markings as well: Just for fun we added the main rotors to get a preview of what this one should look like when it's done: Next up it was time to paint the canopy so the whole thing was masked off with tape and a black base was painted on first since the paint is always so transparent on first pass: Here it is all painted up: I know the color looks dark here in this pic, but it is the same OD color. Another dry fit to see how well this canopy fits: Amazingly perfect fit for such an old mold! I love it! There was an ejector pin mark on the front of this canopy so we needed to sand that away and then polish the clear part to bring it back to standard. I didn't shoot pics of that, but we did install the cockpit permanently, after painting the front instrument panel. Here's a shot of the cockpit and instrument panel: Afterward we put on the two tail rotors: Finally the canopy was cemented into place. All that's left is a bit of touch up painting and this bird is done: Our next project is this AH-1Z that had the cockpit painted so it was finally enclosed inside the fuselage: We then started construction on the nose gun turret. Once the two halves were put together; we found that the bottom was open ended: You're looking at the bottom of that turret. We searched everywhere on the instruction sheet and sprues and found no trace of a part that is supposed to go there. So, out came the strip styrene. A bottom plate was fashioned and glued in place: I may put another larger plate on on top of that.... Once that was done, we assembled the gun... all four parts of it: Main rotors were than assembled: Engines, horizontal stabilizers, and stub wings were installed after that. I also added the small piece that holds the tail rotor on top of the tail. Here's the whole thing all ready for paint: That completes the Hangar portion of the tour. A brief detour through the shipyards shows that the RAF Rescue launch got some additional detail parts: Followed by the installation of her screws and rudders: Now on to the Motor Pool. A few things got painted with a base coat first. One was the troublesome HUMVEE that finally got a coat of US Desert Sand: The Swedish Assault gun also got a base coat of green drab: ...which was left over after basecoating this little gem: While those were drying we tried to assemble the wheels on the SdKfz 234 Pakwagen. After doing these two; I had enough. I'll do the other six later: After that, I decided to move forward on this Shelf Queen, which had been languishing for some time because first the decals went missing, then when they were found the instruction sheet went missing, then the decals disappeared again when the instruction sheet was found again. Finally after this happening four times, I was able to keep both and so we got the decals on this German Type SSYMS 80 flatcar: Some more detailing on that and it will be done. Next we had gloss coated the Cadillac Gage to add decals, but found that these had no markings. So this got a wash, followed by the addition of the machine guns on top: Then the dull coat went on: I found it quite interesting that the Testor's Dullcote frosted the wheels on this. First time that ever happened to me. The little piece of sprue is holding that turret machine gun up while it dries. I may even dig through my decal stash to add some decals to this, even though it went without markings. When the Cadillac Gage got the gloss coat, we also shot a gloss coat on the SAS Bushmaster, thinking that decals were provided for this as well. There were some but the instructions stated that this didn't really need them. We checked out where they would go and found that they go on rather difficult areas to apply them to so I decided to leave all off but one. More on that later. First, here's the Bushmaster after a brown wash over the gloss coat: I had not cemented the upper hull to the lower one on this because I still needed the interior painted. We pulled off the top and painted the interior; basic as it is. We had also installed the wheels and tires: Some of that interior might be seen through the rather large windows so I felt that was needed. Following that, We shot a dull coat on this; removed the masks and assembled the machine gun assembly on top. A few last detail parts were installed too. Here it is with the machine gun assembly dry fit to the top: Oh and that one decal I used, you'll see it in the finished post. Now that concludes our latest tour of Maddog Manufacturing. I hope you enjoyed it. Thank you all for stopping in, comments are always welcome.
    1 point
  30. This acknowledges that there may be structural parts that would be outside of the single media criteria that may be used. Rivets, polycaps, screws or other mechanical fasteners, metal weights, etc. They are typically structural/internal and not for detail purposes
    1 point
  31. Finally picked up the Hasegawa Val kit I've been wanting for a while. Was always too expensive. Also picked up the Airfix 48th Sea Vixen, Sword 72nd AD-4W Skyraider and a gift from a friend....the DoraWings 72nd P-43.
    1 point
  32. Add neither and it will, else no it goes to the standard category. One of the goals of BKB are to do away with the 'what can I add and stay within the rules' questions.
    1 point
  33. David, Hmm, the difference between a figure and a bedroll is pretty easy. Most people can make a bedroll look ok (even me on occasion) but painting figures to look good is an art unto itself. I can't tell you the number of modelers who refuse to include a figure because they lack that skill. Taking that into consideration, how would you take that into judging criteria. Say you have two tanks, booth done very well with similar errors but one has a decently painted figure. The category is Tanks not Tanks with crews. That is why I support the "ignore the figures" aspect of it. Could a new category for Vehicles with Crews be created? Now there is an idea. I would say there are enough entries each year at Nats that would qualify for that kind of category. But now you have to have judges who can judge vehicles and figures and decide which portion has the best chance. When you compare an OK halftrack with some great figures vs a great tank with some mediocre figures, who gets the nod? Saying that, I wonder what Mark and Dave would think of that idea?
    1 point
  34. Found it!! After 4 days it made it's way home!!
    1 point
  35. DAK It's up to you where you want the W.12. If you want it in 103 I'll let it stay there, just know that the only thing judged will be the actual aircraft. It's not in the entrants best interest to move something with a weak story. Why penalize them if that's how they wanted to display their model. Jim
    1 point
  36. After a small break, I’m back at it again. 1. Assembling the fuselage components. One thing that came to mind from building this kit before, was how well things fix together after a little sanding. Some parts required no filling or sanding. I used Tamiya regular white putty when I did need to fill something. 2. Priming,Paint, pre/post shading. I used Tamiya regular primer for all the parts. Before priming, I wiped everything down with a cloth dampened with mineral spirits. This guarantees that any oil will be removed from the plastic prior to painting. I wore latex gloves while doing this. After the primer was completely dry I applied pre-shading to all the parts. I used Tamiya flat black to go over all the recessed line. There’s no need to paint a perfectly straight line over the recess detail. This can be gradually covered up by your fuselage color. I did not want to go over board with the pre-shading. Slight variations in the panel lines is what I was shooting for. I added the fuselage color gradually so that you could see just the right amount of fading. Once I got the effect that I wanted on all of the parts and the fuselage, I finished with post shading. I simply took the fuselage color and added a little bit of white to simulate really faded spots. 3. Adding the rear landing gear. The gear is more than strong enough to support the model. It went together very easily. When I built the first one, the wheels didn’t sit flat. They were angled out a Little. I made sure that wasn’t the case this time. If you like 1/32nd scale F/A-18’s, this would be a great addition to your collection. Chris
    1 point
  37. Guess I should post some pics. You can see the whole album here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/iFhVjKcMDKwFAoHBA
    1 point
  38. Yep, that is where we judged them in Vegas.
    1 point
  39. Thanks a lot Ed. Very tedious painting. Gil, here’s the exact process I used. Step one, painted everything was Tamiya white, X-2. Just a few drops of Mr. color leveling thinner. Waited one day for everything to dry well. Step two, applied Tamiya panel line accent color black. Waited for this to dry completely. Step three, took a Q-tip, dipped it in a small bowl of mineral spirits, squeezed the excess mineral spirits out of the Q-tip by rolling it between my fingers. Starting to wipe the wash off in the direction that would make sense. In my case, where each door would attach to the aircraft I would start at the top, and wipe down. Continue wiping the wash off until you get the effect that you want. It’s a good idea to have a couple of Q-tips on hand once the one you’re working with is saturated with the wash. In the event that you wash off too much, go back and reapply the wash, let it dry, then wipe off again It’s a good idea to keep a pair of sharp tweezers, to pick off any strands of cotton left behind by the Q-tip . Step four, Seal it with your preferred brand of flat clear. For me, I prefer Testors dull coat. I hope this helps. Chris.
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. I would like to see Columbus, Ohio get another show. Mike
    1 point
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