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VonL

Big jet, big panel line-trenches, Suggestions?

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Enthused by Barracuda's new 1/48 details for Revell's big B-1B, I'm doing some recon on this one. I've actually built a few of these monsters already, focusing on the basics, a nice finish and the intent to hang it - with the wings back, natch. This time, I'd like to pull the trigger on that groovy aftermarket stuff for this kit, including what's been accreting in the stash for ages.

 

PROBLEM: Revell's panel lines are just 'too boucoup.' I've previously just ignored them, no highlights, few accents, and let the paint job naturally mute them. With a more detailed build, the surface/finish should be a bit nicer, up close. Initial thoughts are to purposely do a marginal job with putty, to leave more subtle residual panel lines. Concern here is that they will merely show as ragged and/or soft (meniscus effect). Alternate thought is to no-kidding fill them all and re-scribe the entire beast....yeah...sure...

 

Suggestions appreciated!

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This is a tough one. If you want to keep engraved panel lines, the best results will come by totally filling (with super glue) all the panel lines and re-scribing them. That's a bunch of work...

 

Another option would be to totally fill them with any filler material, then build, paint, and decal the model, then draw the panel lines on with a drafting pencil.

 

If they were merely too deep but still sharp, a coat or two of a sandable primer, sanded when dry, would probably take them to an acceptable level. But the fact that they are wide and deep makes that kind of tough.

 

Ralph

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Fill all panel lines completely, sand smooth, prime, repeat as necessary, then scribe the primer or the paint. Paul Budzik shows you how:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqLXyWqkBoQ

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Don't worry about it. Paint it. Do the panel lines in a wash or with pencil (my preferred technique). Anything else is too much like work! Be happy! Nick Filippone

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Don't worry about it. Paint it. Do the panel lines in a wash or with pencil (my preferred technique). Anything else is too much like work! Be happy! Nick Filippone

 

That is certainly in the range of options, and it was the preferred method on previous builds, especially the pencil. Just pondering whether it's feasible to bring it up a notch, without traveling to the gates of hell and back.

 

Photo-flash washed out most of the pencil accents on this commission build, but the heavier stuff around the overwing fairings is visible here:

 

B-1B48thHeeter-31mar123.jpg

Edited by VonL

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I'm currently in the middle of completely rescribing an old 1/32 Revell F4F-4 Wildcat. It was really the only true option, as due to fit problems and closing up bogus separate panels I was going to lose most all of the raised scribing anyway. It's not particularly tough, just laborious and tedious.

 

However, you might have an option not mentioned so far that is a compromise. If you want scribed lines instead of pencil line panels, but don't want to rescribe in a traditional manner, rescribe either the primer or final paint job.

 

This is just a light rescribing that can be done with a scribing tool or a #11 blade, and is done just deep enough to score the paint, but not necessarily the plastic. It's much faster, somewhat finer, and more subtle. Yet, it might offer you the best of both worlds. Just a thought! Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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May I point out something?

 

On the real aircraft, you can't really see the panel lines as they are about 2mm's wide (I've been on an Air Force flightline for the past 35 years as a crew chief/contractor servicer). So even in 1/32nd, they would only be a hair width. I say fill them, sand 'em & let it go.

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However, you might have an option not mentioned so far that is a compromise. If you want scribed lines instead of pencil line panels, but don't want to rescribe in a traditional manner, rescribe either the primer or final paint job.

 

This is just a light rescribing that can be done with a scribing tool or a #11 blade, and is done just deep enough to score the paint, but not necessarily the plastic. It's much faster, somewhat finer, and more subtle. Yet, it might offer you the best of both worlds. Just a thought! Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

That's one of the things Paul Budzik mentions in his video (posted above).

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I have an even better technique than Gil's. If you are going to fill in those trenches, then paint the model and just draw in the panel lines with a .3 mm Pentel technical pencil. Nick Filippone

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