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No experience with rigging


burner12
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I have a Constitution model that is partially started, I believe it is. the Revell kit, don't quote me on that. I have wanted to finish it forever, but what drives me crazy is the rigging. I have no experience with small threading and tying knots. Is there any way to use plastic rigging instead? The threads are so small I can barely keep them in my hand, let alone tie a knot. I can picture her finished looking beautiful if only I could have a different way to add the rigging. Now maybe the long lines going from one mast to another i could just glue. But the small ones are the problematic ones. Is there any aftermarket or tricks to avoiding or using different materials for the rigging?

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I'm sure there are many out there that are really good at this that can give you the definitive answer. As for me, on occasion I do ships that need rigging and have gotten down a 'good enough for me' system. If a line is to be anchored to something with an open end, such as a spar, etc, I tie a slip knot in one end with lots of extra to hang on to. I then put the loop over the open end and pull it tight. A touch of superglue holds the knot and stiffens the extra, making it easier to cut off when the glue dries. I place the other end at the appropriate place and wind it 'round a time or two and hit it with the superglue. Hold it for a tick as it dries. Move on to the next line. After you've done about 20-30 minutes worth, go back and using either scissors or a new exacto blade, cut off the extra bits. Another technique I use is to continue a line on as far as I can. For example, the main spar lift. I start on the mizzen mast and run it up to one side of the spar, then up to the main mast to form the lift, then loop it around the other end of the spar, then run it back to the mizzen mast and loop it around that to form the stay. Do a little planning and you can run many lines this way.

 

Now if that kit you have is the larger scale one, forget all this. It would look crappy in that scale. But in the smaller scales, it makes a tolerable "three foot model". You know, looks great from three feet away.

 

I know the real ship guys are squirming in their seats by now, so I'll be quiet while they tell you the right way to do all this.

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Not sure how much money you wwant to invest, but Micro Mark has this......and NO I do not build ships, I just get their monthly catalog.

 

http://www.micromark...-line,7119.html

 

:Smile_sceptic:

Edited by Mark Aldrich
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WOW! Didn't know about that Mark, thanks for the link.

 

Don't want to put too many aftermarket items into it though. From what I can tell getting experience with rigging just comes down to making a few mistakes to learn from and do better?

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What Mark suggests is for rolling your own ratlines & shrouds -- if you have the Revell kit, you already have them pre-formed.

 

First thing to do is run your rigging thread through beeswax or a candle; that'll "wax down" the fuzz and protect it somewhat from humidity.

Here's a Micro-Mark link: http://www.micromark.com/beeswax-bars-3-bars-1-oz-each,7520.html

 

Rigging is probably going to tie off on a spar or mast, run through some blocks, then end up being coiled around a belaying pin. As Ron says, make a neat slip knot at the spar/mast end then seal with a tiny bit of superglue. Then run the rigging down to the appropriate belaying pin. You don't need a knot at the belaying pin - run the thread down, loop it around the bottom of the belaying pin, then back up around the top and the line itself, tiny tack of superglue then trim or even try to make a coil around the pin or on the deck. If a line ties off to mast/spar at both ends, use the neat slip knot at one end, then just loop it on the other with a bit of superglue. Tiny clamps make great little weights to hold lines while working or drying ...

 

Keep the lines taut, not tight, so as not to deform the masts or spars. Work opposite sides evenly. Do the standing rigging first, then the running rigging, trying to work from inside out. Micro-mark has a few tools to help you hold and manueuver rigging around; I usually use some long tweezers. Check these out:

http://www.micromark.com/5-piece-rigging-tool-set,7054.html

http://www.micromark.com/big-eye-needle-pkg-of-3,7629.html

http://www.micromark.com/mini-clamps-with-vinyl-grips-set-of-5,6462.html

http://www.micromark.com/cross-locking-clamps-set-of-6,7277.html

http://www.micromark.com/squizzers,7676.html

or simply browse around their tweezers and things ....

Model Expo is another good source.

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Model Expo specializes in model ships and supplies.Also how-to books. Micro-Mark tools are better quality from my past experience - a few years ago.

 

MoEx has bags of blocks, belaying pins, cannon balls, chains, etc., etc., ad infinitum.

 

Try those small "duck-bill" alligator clips from Radio Shack. They make great weights to tension a line and free-up your other hand.

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  • 1 month later...

Richard,

I hope I stopped you in time, but do not buy that Loom A Line to set up shrouds and ratlines. The only proper way to set the shrouds is on the model itself.

Ron W.

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Richard - Although I am not a Ship building modeller I have found the 2 part article by Joseph Bossert in July/September Fine Scale Modeler very interesting. Fine Scale also has bonus on-line material for this build on thier web site. It does show rigging of the Alabama in detail. Dan King

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  • 7 months later...

There is a book by an American ship Modeller Lloyd McCaffery. I think it's title is Building Ships in Miniature. He describes making ships rigging from soft wire.

A search on the internet should find it.

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I feel your pain. I recently finished my first rigged sailing ship the "Black Swan" and learned a few things long the way. Look under reviews, ships and Zveda for my review of Pirate ship, Black Swan for how I tackled the challenge. It's really worth the effort. I found it to be one of the most satisfying builds I've ever done.

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  • 5 months later...

I have recently obtained the excellent Revell Vasa Kit and will be looking to use Lloyd McCaffery's ideas for making rigging from wire.

Beading wire is readily available in different gauges from Craft Jewellery specialist and maybe from haberdashery stores.

Lloyd describes how to make miniature rope from wire. He uses a power tool but a hand drill held in a vice could be just as effective.

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