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My new toy: the Badger Renegade Krome detail airbrush


dsteingass
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My first airbrush was a Badger model 150. It is a well-made, solid, all-around great general purpose airbrush. However, after I painted my first model with it:

 

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I soon realized that I was expecting too much from it for detail work, and that I needed more of a precision tool.

 

So, after some research, I found that other artists recommended either the Iwata HP-C Plus or the Badger Renegade Krome. These airbrushes are designed for automotive pinstripers and detailers primarily. Both are top gravity feed, and both have the same features, controls, and 0.21mm needle/nozzle.

 

My final decision was based on price and availablility of parts. The Iwata costs $189 and parts come from Japan. The Badger was $119 and parts come from Chicago.

I also recieved a personal recommendation for the Badger Renegade Krome from the President of the Badger company, Ken "Badger" Schlotfeldt so that helped as well.

 

First, The sleek, riveted, weapons-grade case is impressive, and built to protect the tool very well.

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Extras included in the case include:

Optional .21mm needle/nozzle

Optional flat (non protecting the needls)spray regulator- for getting VERY close to your workpeice.

1/8" hose adaptor

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It feels like it belongs in your hand.

 

 

The needle limiter feature is my favorite, and something I soon realized that I deperately needed after the Model 150.

To you Airbrush veterans, this may seem like old news, but for me, it allows me to find the "sweet spot" for the radius pattern I want to spray, and set it so that the trigger does not go back farther than that point.

 

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This shot shows you how tiny and vulnerable this needle is.

 

As for the function, I first tested it on a piece of paper with some brown ink, and it effortlessy did exactly what I wanted it to do.

So I decided to just jump right into painting my scratchbuilt reinforced bridge with Vallejo Air Gunship Green, which was already primed black.

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The control I have with this tool amazed and excited me a great deal.

Any tool that is frustrating to use will not get used much, but this tool is very well built, very well priced at , and very FUN to use. I cannot wait to use it more and more as much as possible.

Edited by dsteingass
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The reviews all said that the business end of the Renegade Krome was the same as the Velocity. If so, I can believe it!

 

How do you use yours for detail and shading specifically?

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I do mainly aircraft. I'll preshade along panel line. Then I'll apply a semi transparent base coat. I'll go back and fill in panel interiors with a much lightened base color. Then I'll go back with the base color thinned way down and mist a coat back over the highlights. In 72nd scale, you can imagine how small the panels are, but the control with the Velocity is amazing.

 

With other brushes, sometimes I get a good spray, sometimes I don't. With the Velocity, I get a good spray every time.

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OK, so the black shade in the panel line survives after the semi-transparent basecoat? And then the lightened base coat for the panel interiors allows the darker shade near the outside of the panels? I always wondered how you guys did that! Thank you! I am also scribing a lot of recessed panel lines and rivets on my plasticard Necromunda terrain buildings. However, i have realized that my scribing tool leaves a pile on either side of the scribe. When I drybrush highlights over it, I get a ghastly highlight line on either side of the scribe. You can see that on my first photo.

Edited by dsteingass
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Here I have tried your advice, not on a panel line, but as the shading between the deck and side panels.

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Here we can plainly see my aim and arm movement needs work, And I probably should have used an ink or wash rather than the same black acrylic that I used to touch up the ironwork eh?

Ooops, oh well, live and learn huh?- I am still having fun btw.

 

ps. And in my defense, it is DIFFICULT to airbrush in your right hand whilst shooting a pic in digital macro with your left hand, hoping the focus is on the right thing ;)

Edited by dsteingass
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Looks great! I'm just starting to think about replacing the airbrushes I've had for years, and I like the fact that the price of the Krome seems to be mid-line AND especially that it's an American airbrush that I can get parts for here easily. Thanks for the info and the recommendation!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I got the Badger Renegade Velocity and I love it. I own 5 airbrushes, and it is by far the best for shading and detail work.

I second that on the Renegade Velocity. It's opened up a whole new level of airbrush accuracy for me!

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Badger actually does some professional artist endorsements.

 

If anyone is interested, here is the set of terrain so far:

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That looks stunning. Definitely a wargame table wlorth 'fighting' on! Brilliant work Dave! I love all the crates and boxes below; I'd love to get some of the smaller ones for my 1/72 scale armies.

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  • 1 month later...

  • Thanks Mark! - Those crates and boxes are a mix of Armorcast Resin pieces and my own homemade bitz box scrounges.

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