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sumterIII

Resin question

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The area I need to fill is almost 1/4 inch deep and 12 inches long, I was thinking of using red or green glazing putty or bondo because of the large area. Any ideas or thoughts from anyone here?

Thanks

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I'd start by shimming it up with plastic strip or something to minimize the space to be filled by whatever filler you use. Glue it in with superglue until you've got a shallow/narrower area. A quarter inch is pretty deep.

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Ron is right! That's not a gap, that's a chasm! Filling it with strip plastic will greatly minimize the amount of filler you need, as well as the related shrinkage IF you use putty. I also recommend using super-glue mixed with baby powder as a filler. It'll dry faster abd doesn't shrink; allowing you to glue the strip wedge AND fill the surface at the same time! Hit it all with some accelerator an you can start sanding it smooth right away!

 

GIL

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I'm not sure plastic will work, here is a picture so you can have a better idea. I need to form a more round shape on the bottom, as you can see it's concave now.

Anyone have any experience with long term bonding of filler or bondo on resin?

Edited by sumterIII

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In situations like that, I've used combinations of sheet plastic, 5-minute epoxy, putty and a bit of brutality with the rasp and file set, just to keep it strong and get the shape close. Show it no mercy.

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Epoxy sounds like an idea, Ive used that before on resin with very good results.

Super glue and baby powder???? that's a new one, for this I might need a case of CA though... :blink: :blink:

 

Thanks

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If you do go the superglue/baby powder route, buy the CHEAPEST superglue you can find (4 tubes for $1 pack is perfect). The very thin, expensive, name brand hobby shop type superglues actually react too quickly with the powder. The cheap stuff allows enough working time to apply the "paste" before it sets.

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Gil

What is the mix ratio?

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Automotive glazing putty (like Acryl Blue) doesn't have much strength - its only meant to fill scratches and very minor "dings". For as much as you have to fill, Bondo (the two part stuff) might be the way to go - at least for the big holes. For the big gaps I'd drill a couple small (1/16) holes into the resin for the Bondo to ooze into and create a "mechanical bond".

 

I haven't looked for it lately, but MinWax used to sell something a lot like Bondo (smelled the same!) as "Epoxy Wood Filler"; it was available at Home Depot and the like. Only advantage being you could buy a much smaller can than actual Bondo automotive filler.

Bondo "sets" in a few minutes, but it takes a day or so to get really hard - you want to do the rough shaping and sanding within an hour our two or it will become a lot harder to work.

Good luck!

Don

 

 

 

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The mix ratio for superglue/baby powder:

 

Dump a small pile of powder onto a butter tub lid (about 1" dia.). Level it out a little with a toothpick. Place a drop (or 3-4) on the powder. Mix the glue into the powder with a toothpick until it thickens to your liking. Apply to your gap!

 

You'll have a working time of 30secs to a minute once you get it mixed. After that, it'll start to harden. When that happens, move to another section of the powder and repeat the process as needed. The advantage to the butter tub lid is it will allow you to save unused powder (or at least some of it) if you want. Also, you can flex it to remove the dried stuff when you're done and want more working room on the lid.

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I'd start by shimming it up with plastic strip or something to minimize the space to be filled by whatever filler you use. Glue it in with superglue until you've got a shallow/narrower area. A quarter inch is pretty deep.

 

 

I had that exact problem with the kit I've got going right now, & I solved it the way you described:

 

IMG_2108.jpg

 

IMG_2184.jpg

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Use epoxy putty to fill 99% of the hole. Then follow up with putty. The epoxy putty will produce an indestructible fill job, won't crack and won't shrink.

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Thanks for the help, I'll let you know how it works out.

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