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The Green Floral Foam


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Has anyone tried the green floral foam to use as a base for groundwork? I know that it cuts easily but don't know how well it would hold up in a diorama since it only lasts about a year with an arrangment on it.

 

Thanks.

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Mike,

 

I know what ya mean, thankfully what I have in mind is a snow scene using Hudson & Allen snow, so I'd just be useing white glue and a medium gel to hold it down

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I have used it. My Dio Base isn't finished, but once I cut/carved each part for the different elevations and such, I sealed the whole thing in Modge Podge. That made it solid and very firm, allowing my plaster to adhere to it without any problems to the foam itself. I think, based on what a friend of mine involved in the floral industry told me, is that the water added to flowers in the foam is what mostly cause it to eventually 'decay/deteriorate'. So far, my dio base has been consistently solid for the last three years.

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Thanks for the info, I guess that I'll give it a shot

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've got some of this stuff and would like to use it to sculpt and simulate water around a ship. Likewise am concerned about its reaction to solvents/paint. Is there something that could be applied to the surface as a barrier, that will keep the shape of the surface and maybe seal up the foam's porousity?

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I've got some of this stuff and would like to use it to sculpt and simulate water around a ship. Likewise am concerned about its reaction to solvents/paint. Is there something that could be applied to the surface as a barrier, that will keep the shape of the surface and maybe seal up the foam's porousity?

 

Yes. Either Modge Podge or slightly diluted white glue painted over the top. Two to three coats will give it a clear, semi-gloss coat that is impervious to any seepage but subsequenty coats of paint. The Modge Podge is what I used and it works very well. It can be found in large white mayonnaise-type plastic bottles in any train store or hobby shop that sells train accessories. Micheal's craft mart also sells it.

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Righteous - I will expeditiously go and hunt down some of this, how-you-say, Modge Podge. Maybe will experiment with some artists' acrylic gel too, but I suspect there will be an economic advantage to the big bottle of MP.

 

Have also done a recent experiment with some spray paint from Hobby Lobby that's supposed to produce a simulated 1/1 scale stone surface when it dries: I sprayed a layer of this stuff on a piece of scrap wood and it looks like it might make a pretty effective ground cover, if I'd had the prsence of mind to buy some in green or brown. It dried hard, so I sanded it down to see if it might make a good concrete surface. Haven't painted that yet, but it looks good so far.

 

THANX for the steer to the Modge Podge - !!!

Edited by VonL
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Yes, Krylon has "Make It Stone" in large aerosol spray cans. There are several color choices, so you can pick your rock look and texture without having to paint it later. I sprayed it directly onto foam board with no problems other than slight warping of the big sheet. Get this stuff at Michael's or Hobby Lobby. You don't have to go to Japan to get it.

 

Ed

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  • 10 months later...

I used some to make a replica of the Alamo for a table display. It cuts and carves easily but is very gritty. I did not seal it and the enamel paints I sprayed on it had no effect. It made such a mess I haven't used it since.

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So far it's held up. The H&A snow works, frist I used a spray can of white to undercoat it, then I applied the snow.

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