Jump to content

Mclaren M8b


Recommended Posts

This is my next project.

I built this kit about 5 years ago. It did not turn out as nice as I would have hoped. The paint was semi-gloss at best. The metal finish areas were flat. General fit and construction... just not that good. Because of all this, I tossed the thing in the trash not long ago. I believe that my skills have improved over the course of time and since I got a great deal on a secont kit, I thought I would try it again.

IMG_6720-vi.jpg

 

Right away I recall what a crap kit this was. I wish I had a proper memory. Thin soft warped plastic every where. Nothing fits together the way it should. Here is the rear section. The right side is glued in place. The left side is nowhere near close to where it should be. Holding it in position takes more effort than you would expect. I need a third hand just to apply the super glue. "Oh Honey! Could you come in hear please?"

IMG_6726-vi.jpg

 

The chassis plate and side wall fit is no better. Here the center side walls are glued up. Notice how far out both the front & rear are from meeting their intended positions. Good thing I love the build process more than the final product. Low confidance on day one does not bode well for final result. :smiley13:

IMG_6723-vi.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 54
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I have gotten past some of the initial construction frustrations. The major body panels are assembled and have the first coat of primer. The chassis plate is assembled and has been primered, painted gloss black enamel & given the alclad chrome treatment. It looks a bit gaudish all by itself but I think that once some alternate shaded components get added it will look the business.

IMG_6728-vi.jpg

 

A little engine work has also been started. This kit has a kind of cool aspect in that much of the plumbing is supplied via two parts trees formed in black & metallic grey vinyl. I may try to improve some of these parts with braided wire and better fittings. Some look just fine as they are though.

IMG_6729-vi.jpg

 

My last bit of progress is the assembly of header pipes. Painted flat white, brush distresses with brown & black chalks and flat coated over the top.

IMG_6731-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking. Comments welcome

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised. This company has made excellant models (of aircraft) in my experience. Are they AM moulds or bought from someone else? I've had my eye on thier Ford GT 40 for a while, should I Bother?

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I have been told that there is a PE set for this kit. Booger! Now I have to wait for it to get here...Or do I ? ? ?

 

I was looking at the underside of the body panels and noticed sink marks in a patterned area. Well there will be no filling them without loosing the pattern. The pattern represents some sort of quited insulation. I have an idea to recreate this that might be a bit nicer than the kit original. Here is what I started with:

IMG_6732-vi.jpg

 

I cut up some pieces of the box the kit came in and with a burnishing tool, scribed some rounded lines in the card stock. The first one looked pretty good. I used a thick gooey craft glue to attach it to the under side.

IMG_6736-vi.jpg

 

With all of them formed, in place and primed, I think the result was worth the effort.

IMG_6738-vi.jpg

 

Next on to the underside of the front body panel for a repeat of this effect.

This poses a curious question. Does using the kit box to produce additional features knock it out of the OOTB category?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks good so far. There was an article in MRRN a while back that pointed out two things:

 

1. Decide up front if you want to build the model closed up or open, and stick to the decision

 

2. Ditch the vinyl "squids" for better braided lines--but only if you want to leave the car opened up. If you're building it body-on and closed up, don't bother since you won't see most of it anyway.

 

I don't recall the plastic being so warped in the original issues, but you're handling it the same way I would-match the seam, glue it, let the glue dry, and move on. The quilting solution you had works well, too--can't say if it pushes the model out of OOB (it probably does, but you never know until you ask a head judge).

 

Ralph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments Ralph. I intend to go body off and I'm already going down the braided wire substitution path. And the PE set is on its way.

 

I was being cheeky with the OOTB comment/question. Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised. This company has made excellant models (of aircraft) in my experience. Are they AM moulds or bought from someone else? I've had my eye on thier Ford GT 40 for a while, should I Bother?

 

Chris

 

This was one of the last of the "real" Accurate Miniatures kits (as in a new mold, done by AM). Unlike their aircraft kits which were basically aimed at matching Tamiya/Hasegawa quality, their 2 auto kits were pretty ambitious, and the engineering and fit suffered. If the company wasn't squeezed for time another round of tweaks to the molds might have helped.

 

But I'm curious - as far as I know AM never did a GT40. Are you thinking of Fujimi? They have some nice 1/24 GT40 MkI and MkII kits - they are sadly curbside, but there are assorted detail sets available if you want to add an engine.

 

There are also rumors of a 1/12 GT40 from Trumpeter, but the expected price may actually be high enough to stop me from buying one if it ever sees the light of day :smiley19:

 

Don Schmitz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was one of the last of the "real" Accurate Miniatures kits (as in a new mold, done by AM). Unlike their aircraft kits which were basically aimed at matching Tamiya/Hasegawa quality, their 2 auto kits were pretty ambitious, and the engineering and fit suffered. If the company wasn't squeezed for time another round of tweaks to the molds might have helped.

 

But I'm curious - as far as I know AM never did a GT40. Are you thinking of Fujimi? They have some nice 1/24 GT40 MkI and MkII kits - they are sadly curbside, but there are assorted detail sets available if you want to add an engine.

 

There are also rumors of a 1/12 GT40 from Trumpeter, but the expected price may actually be high enough to stop me from buying one if it ever sees the light of day :smiley19:

 

Don Schmitz

 

Hi Don,

 

I know I saw an AM version of the GT40. I looked at it twice at my favorite hobby shop but did not get one. I remember it because I've built several AM planes and was really satisfied with the results (especially the A-36. P-51A.) Have not seen one since. I think it was the new GT40 version. Thanks for the recommendation on other GT40 kits.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Don,

 

I know I saw an AM version of the GT40. I looked at it twice at my favorite hobby shop but did not get one. I remember it because I've built several AM planes and was really satisfied with the results (especially the A-36. P-51A.) Have not seen one since. I think it was the new GT40 version. Thanks for the recommendation on other GT40 kits.

 

Chris

 

Polar Lights did a kit of the new Ford GT a few years ago, and it was recently re-boxed. Perhaps this is the kit you're thinking of...

 

Ralph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I have the padding done on the front section of the body. I really like the way this effect has turned out. While I was in the neighborhood I filled a couple underside seams that are visible in this pic. Those two nasty sink marks are gone too. Since the body will be loose I imagine it will be picked up and looked under more than usual so I better put some effort here.

IMG_6767-vi.jpg

 

The front body panel does not pose the same challenge as the rear in that it can be put on and removed easily without the plumbing beneath interfering with fit. It is a rather loose fit though without any positive contact points. There is nothing to really hold the panel in place, It just rests there. Well I would rather it sit in place properly and not show the warp if I can help it. Here I have used some brass rod to produce a latch for the part of the body that meets the chassis. I will do something simple & similar to the front edge where it meets the intake area next.

IMG_6784-vi.jpg

IMG_6783-vi.jpg

IMG_6782-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking, Comments welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a quick update. I received the PE set this week and am rather excited by one unexpected aspect.

They have attempted to reproduce the piano hinges for the side body sections(doors).

I hope this is not one of those parts best left on the tree and perhaps it is a bit gimicky but I'm

going to build them up to see how they turn out. Wish me luck/skill.

 

IMG_6785-vi.jpg

 

PS: I will be annealing(heat treating) the parts before attempting to make such tight bends.

I will also be using brass rod to replace the too thin & flexible wire supplied with the set.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Bun E. Carlos

Beer....................PLEASE get this altogether for a FEATURE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I love it so far!!!!!!!!!!! Gonna make a copy for reference when I do mine............BTW, I hunted down that MPC 1/20 M8B :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have answered my own question. The parts are NOT best left on the tree. They turn out fantastic with just a little forethought and technique.

 

The parts have been annealed by holding over a lighter flame until they glow red. When done, the once bright nickel finish is burnt metal in appearance and very easy to bend. And LESS likely to break from repeated bending.

 

Here is my setup.

One piece of tape sticky side up (horizontal piece) and two to hold it down. The first PE piece is positioned on the tape to keep it from wandering during the process. The brass rod is over sized and held down with the yellow tape. Notice the intended daylight between the tabs for the second half to fit for the next step.

IMG_6792-vi.jpg

 

I used an eyeglass flathead screw driver to roll each leg and force it back into the rod nice & square. I am not concerned about the small amount of the tabs that sort of hang out after the fact I don't dare try to trim them and cut through the whole thing.

IMG_6794-vi.jpg

 

I had to lift the first half up a bit to slide the second into position but it fit without any trouble. I was surprised by how easy this fit. I though for sure it was going to be a trouble spot.

IMG_6795-vi.jpg

 

After rolling the legs of the second half over in the same manner, I folded it closed and pressed the halves together tightly with a smooth jaw pair of pilers to set the shape of the thing. This is what makes the hinge/rod raise off the same plane as the bracket part of the hinge and give it the proper dimensional look. The final assembly all trimmed & ready for install is quite nice. It even operates as a hinge should.

IMG_6797-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking, comments welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Progress this weekend.

With the hinges looking better than expected. I need to dress up the underside of the doors. I filled two deep sink marks. I added a strip of styrene to the outer door edge to give the hinge a wider area to secure to. Each side has a trap door for fuel. It's underside detail (hinge & latch) is replicated in PE with additional styrene.

IMG_6799-vi.jpg

 

On to the engine. I secured the headers and started working on the trans axle suspension area. I replaced all the longer connecting rods in the kit with styrene rod. It is a very subtle difference but I preferred them over trying to remove mold lines from the kit parts. I was also able to locate those four (two each side) very difficult to install engine support rods that pass through the headers.

IMG_6802-vi.jpg

 

I rebuilt the coil over shocks with wire springs (solder). They appear to not reach the lower control arm but the upper control arms are not yet secured in their proper position in this pic.

IMG_6804-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking, comments welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a small update. I don't know why I get so excited about doing wheels & tires but I do. I have the wheel hubs mounted to the suspension, the rims assembled & painted and dry fit in place they look good. I got ahold of some new media editing software (Roxio Easy Media Creator 8) so I was playing around with the collage idea. I've seen branding on pictures on various sites so I thought I might play with that as well. Having your work available publicly (Fotki , Photobucket, etc.), any one can link to it and claim it as theirs unless you do something like this.

IMG_6837a-vi.jpg

 

Also in the works. The rear stabalizer bar is being re-built with solid rod.

IMG_6842-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking, comments welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Bun E. Carlos

THIS IS AN ARTICLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THANKS ..............keep posting, I'm going to print out this whole thing :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree! Your reworking the tubing with rods shows your dedication to fidelity. Can't wait to see it in person! But I'm gonna have to remember to bring my magnifying glass......damn old eyes! :smiley18: Lookin' GREAT Jay!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello again,

I 'm still plugging away on this project. First up, I have completed the rebuild and install of the rear stabilizer bar. It turned out much nicer than the kit piece.

IMG_6846a-vi.jpg

 

Then I turned my attention to the fuel delivery system and distributor. I had planned to replace the kit vinyl plumbing with wire and this is the first real bit of progress toward that goal. I built up the kit distributor and wired it. The only plug wire I had on-hand was orange. Since this is not period correct, after assembly I painted them black. Painted wire insulation never looks really good. I may undo this and leave them orange and take my chances with the model police. My first attempt at plumbing the fuel block did not turn out as I wanted. The wire I used was a touch too big and way too inflexible. In the end I used clear mono-filament to deliver fuel to each velocity stack.

IMG_6851a-vi.jpg

 

Here are the parts in place. The fuel block is secured while the distributor will get a bath in 90% alcohol to remove the black before final installation.

IMG_6855a-vi.jpg

 

Thanks for looking, Comments welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...