Jump to content
cgutzmer

Steeds of the Aces

Recommended Posts

Made some progress on the old Revell 1/48 MkI Spitfire...

100_2689.jpg

The seat is painted, but I need to add the harness yet. After that I'll be ready to close up the fuselage and make some rapid progress. This is mostly OOTB except for the added O2 hose. Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think that hose was the first thing I noticed so great detail add! :)

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK!

Its time to get this ball rolling :) all supplies on hand - I will likely do some painting experimenting along the way so might be a bit slow to start. Cockpit will be first up but forgot to include it in the pics below :( anyhow - just to show you I am ready here are some opening shots!

 

 

This first pic shows the various prints - why so many you ask? The first is the standard card printout. The second is the metallic on Red River Silver. The third is just one page on glossy photo stock. This will be for the blue nose and nose cone only to maintain the shiny look of the metallic paper. The fourth is printed on standard 20lb paper and will be used for making pseudo decals on the metallic paper. These will be sprayed with Krylon gloss coat or something similar eventually. This also includes what I will be edge coloring with and a shot of the engine parts to show the expected detail level.

p51lambieII1.JPG

 

another angle to show the metallic vs standard

p51lambieII2.JPG

 

this shot shows the sheen differences a bit

p51lambieII3.JPG

 

closer shot of the engine parts.

p51lambieII4.JPG

 

should be cutting today!

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - The proof is in the pudding they say :) Here are some pics with some commentary. I cut out everything round with my paper drill - thank goodness for that! Next steps and other mods I will be doing following the pics!

 

The main cockpit page pre cut

p51lambieII5.JPG

 

This is the radio box - please note there are TWO of them. This will be my first test. I am going to paint one after it glued and one before its glued to compare results.

p51lambieII6.JPG

 

Just showing a bunch of cut parts

p51lambieII7.JPG

 

Here is a shot of the instrument details - please note it looks much more uneven in the cut than it is.... darn macro....

p51lambieII8.JPG

 

Closeup of a couple levers I am going to paint up and possibly add another layer to the knobs for additional effect

p51lambieII9.JPG

 

Next steps -

 

1. cut out another instrument panel to overlay - I will cut out all the instruments so the ones behind look recessed. I will likely but some shiny scotch tape in there to simulate glass in front of the instruments.

 

2. Use Swampfox's color technique to find the right colors (this also entails learning how to use the guoache properly)

 

3. Test paint radio boxes

 

4. possibly scratchbuild a small cushion for the pilots seat - I dont quite understand the seat how it has a rather large curve on the front like there shold be a cushion in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And people think I'm crazy for building vacuforms..........

 

 

There are more parts, more cutting, and more shaping in those paper models than in building anything in plastic! Impressive work, both in scope and technique!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is the radio box - please note there are TWO of them. This will be my first test. I am going to paint one after it glued and one before its glued to compare results.

I assume you're talking about painting the edges. Well, there is the other alternative way. Don't paint them at all. Take a look at my picture with the coin in it. You can see the box as simple as your radio. Outside edges are cut at 45 degree angle. This method is kind of a shortcut ;) When you'll put the box together, the white edges will simply disappear. If you're using water-based glue, use minimum amount to eliminate deformation problem.

 

is a shot of the instrument details - please note it looks much more uneven in the cut than it is.... darn macro....

Chris, to have any small part look good in macro, you have to work in macro :D. Here's the solution to that problem:

 

http://www.micromark.com/OPTIVISOR-BINOCUL...IFIER,6711.html

 

Anyway, It's good to see you in action. :smiley20:

 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Gil and Peter :) I catch enough flak from the family for cutting bits of paper let alone if I wore magnifiers!

 

For cutting at a 45 degree angle I hadnt thought of that but its a good idea worth trying!

Thanks!

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While Chris is practicing his 45 degree cuts, ;) let me show you my P.11c pilot's seat.

First basic, the kit version of that seat:

 

IMG_9070-0-s.JPG IMG_9072-0-s.JPG IMG_9078-0-s.JPG IMG_9097-0-s.JPG

 

Thanks to my friends from Poland I have learned that the P.11c' seat was adapted to the back assembly parachute. So I have decided to make the upholstery based on what I have seen in the P.11c in the Krakow's museum. I have carved it from two pieces of cardboard glued together. The buttons are made of styrene rod inserted into the holes.

 

IMG_9405-0-s.JPG IMG_9432-0-s.JPG

 

The seat belts - I have made them more visually appealing by removing half of the card thickness from the strip and leaving the fasteners and the brackets in the original card thickness.

 

IMG_9129-0-s.JPG IMG_9130-0-s.JPG IMG_9447-0-s.JPG

Edited by Rutek63

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The headrest - For convenient glueing I have removed half of the card thickness here as well, but only from the bottom of the part with the leaf-like sections (first picture). After assembling I touched up the complete part with paint, gave it a layer of mid density SG, polished it and sprayed a layer of the clear matt acrylic.

 

IMG_9264-0-s.JPG IMG_9396-0-s.JPG

 

Finally, I have put everything in the cockpit and covered the cage with its top part.

 

IMG_0002-1-s.JPG IMG_0011-1-s.JPG IMG_0012-1-s.JPG IMG_0014-1-s.JPG IMG_0015-1-s.JPG IMG_0022-1-s.JPG

 

Regards!

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter, your skills set in this paper medium is amazing. Adding paint to paper surfaces without causing wrinkles or warps or bubbles is a skill I would like to have. Keep up the great work. You are making my F-86F look primitive. I have it together now with the warps out and the surfaces straight.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats amazing! Those are great tips for adding super details :) thanks for sharing with us :) I am kinda on hold following a how to match paint colors to a model for coloring edges :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Ed and Chris!

 

Adding paint to paper surfaces without causing wrinkles or warps or bubbles is a skill I would like to have.

 

Ed,

As I stated in my first post, I covered the pages of my kit with a thin layer of a Nitrate Dope. So, the surface of the card is not longer bare paper. ND protects the paper before the water-based paint perfectly. Edge coloring doesn't matter because there you use your paint only in small amounts. if you have to paint bare paper for some reason, use only a moderate amount of the paint and nearly no water for dilution. You can almost compare this method to a dry-brushing technique. If you're still afraid of deformation, don't paint all your surface at ones. Apply the paint to a small area, wait until it dries and go ahead again. The first layer will appear uneven but the second will be OK. And of course I'm talking about the old fashion brushing, not airbrushing.

 

Also remember, I'm building this model in the standard manner where the paint is only allowed to color the edges and hide the model construction seams that are not present on the original airplane. So it's relay minimum painting we're talking about.

 

Regards!

Peter

Edited by Rutek63

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me show you pictures of the cockpit equipped with some devices. I have decided to build this model using only the kit parts, yet I couldn't help it but build push rod for the Viet's starter from scratch (first small picture).

 

IMG_0813-0.JPG

 

IMG_0832-0E-s.JPG IMG_0838-0E-s.JPG IMG_0750-0E-s.JPG IMG_1544-8-S.JPG IMG_0819-0E-s.JPG IMG_1543-8-S.JPG IMG_1559-8-S.JPG IMG_0801-0E-s.JPG

 

Regards!

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After some serious debating with myself, I'll enter this group build too. Not sure how successful I'll be, but I'll try. My subject will be Ernst Udet's Albatros D.V using Wingnut Wings' 1/32 kit. (Yes Chris, its plastic). I may be slow at it, seeing as I'm trying to finish a GPM Sherman, ATF Dingo I and Scud Missile Launcher, all in paper.

 

My painting skills are rusty, so here's hoping! :smiley24:

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GREG! PLASTIC! :) that will be a new sight for me :) looking forward to it!

 

Hey peter that is an excellent cockpit and I really like how you made those pics to highlight the subject.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My build has begun. If the incredible fit of the first seven parts is any indication, I'm gonna really enjoy this build. :lol:

 

Greg

post-757-1275690268_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My MkI Spit is painted! I did the Dark Earth on Friday evening. I decided to do a "tight feather-edge" mask for applying the Dark Green today. I used Sherwin Williams yellow tape (much like Tamiya tape, but much cheaper and in bigger rolls) and placed thread along the mask edges to raise those edges ever so slightly.

100_2742.jpg

This is TEDIOUS work, but it's VERY effective!

100_2745.jpg

Note that I've also post shaded both colors with lighter tones to add a bit of "character" to the camo. At this distance, the camo almost looks like a hard-edge mask. However, if you get within 6inches, you can clearly see the soft edges.

 

By the way, I initially was going to use some blue-tac to do the camo, but had a devil of a time trying to put it on the model. It would stick to my fingers better than the model! Made it impossible to put into place! Is this because I was in my garage and it was rather hot (above 90deg)? Do any of you who use this method regularly have this problem, or did my environment create the problem? Thanks!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great Gil! Thanks for showing us how you masked it off :)

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice work, Gil! :smiley20:

 

Later,

 

Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, Gil has all of his airplane painted in camouflage, and I'm still sitting in the cockpit. It's time to hurry up.

 

Here is the P11's instrument panel and the compass:

 

IMG_1547-0.JPG

 

IMG_1552-0.JPG

 

To build a more appealing instrument panel I have used two flat panels. In addition, I have used stretch sprue to make dial rings and I have used Micro-Glaze to make a glass imitation. Here are the links that helped me do this:

 

http://www.ratomodeling.com/articles/plastic_rings/

http://www.micromark.com/MICRO-GLAZE-15-OZ,7585.html

 

Now, about the compass. Instruction suggests rolling up a tight cylinder out of a rectangular piece of paper and then file one end of it into the shape of a hemisphere. You can make this easier by cutting the piece of paper the way I have shown in the picture below, and then roll it up. You'll end up with a hemisphere shape almost without filing.

 

IMG_1534-0.JPG

 

Regards!

Peter

Edited by Rutek63

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Peter,

 

Your bag of tricks is amazing. What would happen if you lightly saturated the hemispherical end of the cylinder with a thin super glue? It would seem that when cured the glue would permit filing or sanding to shape easier and without paper burrs. A side benefit is that the tight roll of paper will never unwind. I ask this because I do not know the answer.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be in the camo stage, but it looks like you have as many parts in your cockpit as I have in my entire model! Mind boggling craftsmanship!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Edited by ghodges

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats awesome peter! One of the best cockpits I have seen! What weight paper did you roll that out of? My build is on temp hold while I make a quick turkish fokker to hone my skill set a bit - I am rusty.

Chris

Edited by cgutzmer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to hear from you guys.

 

Ed,

Thank you for mentioning the Super Glue.

Saturating paper or cardstock with super glue prior to sending is natural to me, I forgot to mention that. I always keep super glue in three densities on my desk. I also use it for gluing, gap filling, and some part reinforcement.

 

GIL,

Soon that cockpit will be hidden in the fuselage and not much will be visible. So it is

kind of like art for art's sake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Chris!

 

In Haliński's models, especially new ones he has some parts printed on thin 20lb

paper. This paper is usually reserved for the parts intended to be rolled. good luck with practicing on Turkish Fokker. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Come back soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...