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Dakimbrell

IPMS/USA Member
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Everything posted by Dakimbrell

  1. My neighbor has a big, very expensive bass boat that takes up two of the three bays of his garage. He gets it out maybe a dozen times a year. I have a similar garage with shelves full of models. Based on a simple count, they are worth about the same as his boat. I need more room. Dak
  2. I agree we definitely get more for our money these days. Do a side by side comparison with any of the kits from the 1950s or 1960s and you will see that. Except for a few sentimental kits, I don't have anything which is earlier than 1990. Most are less than 20 years old. I too shop around to find the best deal. Dak
  3. When I began building models, they ran from 50cents to 99cents. Today I regularly buy kits that go for $50 or more. I remember in the mid-80s when Tamiya was releasing kits that were pricing at around $35 and thinking they are pricing themselves out of business. My point is, "too expensive" is a relative term and means different things to different people. One guy I knew was continually complaining about contest winners always having the "expensive" kits and that it wasn't fair. Yet, I saw him repeatedly spend $50 or more at flea markets buying bunches of crappy old kits like Frog. But bu
  4. When I start a new model, I set up a file on the computer and begin a page in Word. Each time I work on the model, I take pictures with my mobile phone and then place them in this file. Every time I work on the model, I add some to the article about what I have done. ( This is far easier than trying to remember what I did several weeks in the past.) By the time I'm done, I have a full range of construction photos as well as an article that only needs some editing. I then recaption the phots to state what I am trying to illustrate. When I get it all tied up, I then send it to John via a servic
  5. I still maintain OOB has become obsolescent. True many like it, but that is because they believe they can enter a contest and win with a modern kit without going to great expense or effort. However, technology keeps changing and it seems every year or two they have to tweak the rules again. All the current OOB categories do is make more work for the contest judges. There are better ways to create the same number of categories and make it interesting. Do a builders category. Pick a specific kit and have that as the only entry and require it to be built out of the box. Do a painters ca
  6. Here is the finished vignette. Last model of 2020 for me. Dak
  7. The Meng 1/35th kit OOB. It will be a vignette with the vehicle being painted. Dak
  8. I would disagree that OOB is a test of basic skills, at least the way the rules are today. Originally, I think it came about because there were a bunch of people who didn't want to do the extra detail to be competitive in the main categories. At least that what was told to me by the people behind it in the eighties. Now days, most of my work is done 90% OOB because the things I wanted to add---like periscopes and engine deck screens (on tanks)--are now standard in the kit. I think OOB is a waste of time as it is. If you want to keep it, then make it strictly out of the box and that inclu
  9. People who knowingly cheat don't care if the victory is "hollow". However, I do not automatically assume anyone is cheating. I am just making the point that the complexity of modern kits makes it extremely easy to change or add detail without being noticed. Also, models today are much easier to build as "correct" or as award winning models than those from the early days of OOB forty years ago. What is the point of OOB any longer? Originally, it was to give people a chance to compete without having to rebuild half a model just to be on even ground. Now days, that is no longer the issue. He
  10. Given the design of modern kits and the instruction sheet, combined with the limited time for judging, a builder can get away with all sorts of stuff that violates the letter and spirit of the rules. If someone traded out some parts from a better kit, who would notice? I would bet you could replace a kit cockpit with aftermarket resin and no one would catch it. When the model is done and painted, can you tell the parts are three or four plastic ones or one big resin one? Personally, I think OOB is obsolescent in this day and time. It does create more categories for contestants, but we cou
  11. Should figures included with the kit be judged for the quality of workmanship? A Tamiya armor kit with three figures included in the kit is entered in out of the box. How does this all interact with the diorama rules? Dak
  12. I've been puttering with this off and on for several years. Finally decided to finish it off. The figure is from Coree modified to fit the Tamiya Hayabusa. Dak
  13. !/12th Tamiya Yoshimura Hayabusa X-1 motorcycle with the Coree figure modified to fit. Dak
  14. If you look closely, you can see bullet hole on the starboard side of the engine and oil leaks streaking on both sides.
  15. Actually, I think the flakfierling was too heavy for the M3 half-track. The Maultiers could only carry the single 20mm. One of the 15mm drillings would work. Dak
  16. Work in progress. Eduard Bf-109 E4 "yellow 10" crash landed on Sept 28, 1940 near East Langdon, Kent. More figures will be added. Eduard 1/32nd kit with civilians from various sources. Figures are a little glossy because they have not been dull coated yet. Dak
  17. The Tori Factory track link is slightly over size compared to the real thing. Dak
  18. This is a mid-production Hummel of the 4th Panzer division abandoned on the retreat in to Courland peninsula in the spring of 1945. The DML kit with for Stalingrad and one Alpine figures. There is an interior in the lower hull which has a splendid horror story behind it. But for that you will have to read the Journal article whenever it comes out. Dak
  19. For those interested in how it came out.... Dak
  20. Working on a diorama based around a forklift. The Aoshima kit with the MiniArt hand truck. The propane tank is also from the MiniArt set. The bumper stickers came from Gofer racing Decals. They are a little big, but I think they add to the model. Dak
  21. The Takom kit in 1/35th with four figures from Model Cellar and two from Sovereign (I think). Dak
  22. My friend Mark had Chinese for lunch and got this in the fortune cookie. Dak
  23. Dakimbrell

    Korean Winter

    The 1/35th AFVCLUB Centurion Mk 3 in in the winter of 1950 Figures are from Miniart. Stowage is Squadron, cooking gear Miniart. Fire pit scratch work. Snow is spackling powder. Dak
  24. With the national called off, I got busy doing some figure painting. The busts are from Nuts Planet, and Youngs miniatures. The girls with the goggles is Honey Bee and I have no idea what company made her (she was a gift). I cheat and use Archer eyes and some other decals on parts of the figures. I did paint the leopard skins on the Hussars free hand. I do make my own bases. The armor I did with Alclad. The rest is oils over enamels. The Opalinski brothers are real people that are also characters in some books by Eric Flint. Dak
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