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battle damage

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Hey guys I was looking at models recently online and I have seen some with battle damage they look really good I have tried to practice on a older model but it came out lookin like crap so any tips on how to make realistic battle damage on tanks , planes and ships would help .

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Z,

When it comes to damage, it all depends on how much. Tank fenders are the easiest and usually the first thing damaged on a tank. A candle flame and wooden pencil erasure are the tools. It is best to practice on plastic scrap. I would recommend getting Sheps old books and reading over them. Great for the beginner.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Modeling-Tanks-Military-Vehicles-Shepard/dp/0890240450

 

http://www.amazon.com/How-Build-Dioramas-Aircraft-Figure/dp/0890241953

 

http://www.montageww.com/howtobuilddioramas.aspx

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Z: One of the things you'll probably need to do on almost any battle damaged area is to thin the plastic a LOT. Kit plastic is way too thick to replicate sheet aluminum or steel around an open area that exposes its edges.

 

If you don't have a motor tool, you should invest in one. It doesn't have to be expensive. You can get a rechargeable one for under $40 at most hobby shops, or from Micro-Mark. You might find one even cheaper if you have a Harbor Freight near you. You'll also need some bits for it. A set of various shaped bits can be had for $5-$20, depending on how elaborate a set you choose. Micro-Mark is a good place to find a variety of those. If you visit your dentist, don't be shy about asking him for any older "worn-out" drill bits and grinding bits that he might have lying around; and they'll probably be free!

 

You want to use the lowest speed on the tool when grinding plastic. Too much speed and/or pressure causes heat to build up and the plastic will deform (which can be useful at times!). Heat will also cause the plastic to gunk up a bit too, rendering it useless until you scrape the molten plastic off. You almost always grind away plastic from the INSIDE of the model. Work slowly, and if you're wondering how far you have to go, hold the part up and view it against a bright light. You'll be able to see the area lighten more and more the thinner it gets. That will help you judge where you are and allow you to stop before you poke through prematurely.

 

The thin plastic will not only look more to scale, it will cut much more easily. You can make a jagged opening very easily, and even bend edges to the shape you want. You'll have to add structural details inside that open area, but that's a matter of using good references, some imagineering, and building it to the point you're satisfied with its look. Be sure to take into account whether your damage is resulting from external fire (damage turns/points inward) or an internal explosion (damage splays outward); and shape your area accordingly.

 

That's enough to get ya started. Those references Mark cited are top notch! You can also do searches on various modeling sites for builds with battle damage to see how others did theirs. Hope this helps!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Thanks for the awesome tips and i would like to see some of your battle damaged models if you don't mind posting pictures.

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Z Here are some examples of fender battle damage I did on a German Sturmtiger. I use PE fenders and cut & bent them to what I wanted. Also you will note that some are missing all together. That is also battle damage. Hope this helps;

 

Strumtigerwipfinished019_zpsc14acaf4.jpg

Strumtigerwipfinished018_zps28b7d5cc.jpg

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While no where as heavy as Chris' efforts, here are a couple dented up fenders.... If I remember, this is candle flame, a motortool and steelwool smoothing.

3_zps697df0a4.jpg

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I see what you guys mean and the fenders looked great on both a question for Mr Aldrich what is the metal barrel on your model for how come you don't use the kit barrel and how do you make sure its in scale.

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Z,

The kit is Dragon's Premium release 6359. The barrel comes with the kit. Along with the original 2 piece and a newer slide molded one piece affair. The aluminum barrel matched the length of the two plastic one's so I used that. Plus, it looked more the part based on photos I looked at.

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OK where did you get the metal barrels I might try this

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Z,

 

You can pick up aftermarker metal barrels in 1/35, 1/72, and 1/25 scale. Here are two good souces.

 

RB models

http://www.rbmodel.com/index.php?action=products&cat=news

 

The Barrel Store

http://www.thebarrelstore.com/

 

Chris G. :Smile_sceptic:

Edited by 802chrisg

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Aber, RB, Elefant and others all make Su-100 barrels. Here is a link a review that shows the parts. I did this as a IPMS review but it was long ago and archived so I cannot link the page.

 

http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/reviews/vehicles/dragon/dr6359.html

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