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Weathering help


Guest PetrolGator
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Guest PetrolGator
I need some weathering advice. I'm working on a ship (surprise!) that I want to display in a less than new condition.


Note the Laffey:


2199659.jpg


5-N had a tendency to wear down, dull out, and show primer pretty quickly. Based on colorized images, I'm 90% sure this is the primer showing through.


Now, I've brainstormed a few ways to do this and would appreciate any feedback:


1) Primer (Vallejo or 1200 Mr Surfacer. I also have a ModelMaster Lacquer that I did not realize I owned) Hit it with Future to seal in the primer, then paint. Once the paint cures, use differing shades of 5-N mixed with grey and/or white to dull with my airbrush. Particular attention will be paid to the waterline. Again, see the reference photo.


Now, here's where I deviate:


2a) Use a pencil eraser to wipe away the 5-N in spots where the forward wake would have chipped away the paint. My issue here is that the 5-N in the picture appears chipped off, not wiped.

2b) Use a cotton swab/Q-tip/etc with some Tamiya thinner (won't eat plastic) to do the same. Only issue here is damaging TOO Much of the paint and looking like I made a mistake with a clean up, not weathering.

2c) Scratch it off with a hobby knife in SMALL areas. This is time consuming, but handled with skill, would simulate the effects of wave action VERY well. I'm leery of cutting into paint.

2d) Utilize a wash and white paint. Old Fashioned and probably not as convincing.


Opinions? Ideas?

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Scale effect will be the problem with chippping. On armor and aircraft one of the techniques is to apply something that will cling to the primer, yet not damage it, that is easily removable. Salt on a dampened surface wax, etc. have all been used. Then you over paint with your color. When the salt or whatever is removed, which can be done simply by rubbing or using tape to pull it off, the primer shows through with a sharp edge to the paint. Table salt may be too coarse in your scale, but maybe using popcorn salt, which is a much thinner grain, would do. I'd seal the primer before adding the chipping agent to make sure it doesn't get damaged.

 

Good luck.

Edited by Ron Bell
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Guest PetrolGator

I'm hearing a LOT of people recommending this method for the "chipping" effect. I've also heard hairspray, but I think that'll be hard to pull off in the scale. I have a lot of pictures showing pretty significant chunks of paint being sheared off on higher speed warships. I think the biggest thing is that I need to be sparse with the usage of the salt. Using a brine, precipitated into solids will look waaaay over scale. Individual grains, slightly wetted or applied dry may do it.

 

That being said, I'm definitely going to seal the primer with some Future before attempting this. I'll post pictures when I give this a try over the weekend. I think I'll be ready to paint the hull by then.

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Hairspray would work, especially if you are using a Q-tip to remove it from the waterline. The trick would be using a thin enough tip and working gently to achieve the effect you are looking for. Either way, I'll be watching this with interest.

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Guest PetrolGator

Okay. Frustrated. Please note that the base coat blow looks like crap. I pretty much didn't care if I touched it. This is a test model, and nothing more.

 

My steps:

 

Prime with Mr Surfacer 1200 ---> Future ---> Use small dabs of water to place salt ---> Sprinkle salt on the hull ---> Allow to dry ---> Spray on Base Coat ---> NOTE ANNOYING DARK RINGS ---> Spray again. ---> Rings ---> Spray a lighter shade along hull ---> Let Dry ---> Remove Salt ---> Dark wash to try to blend in the dark rings. ---> Give up ---> Dull coat to see if that'll help.

 

Definitely do not profit. I'm using Tamiya acrylic paints. Perhaps the salt is entering solution and changing the shade? Should I dilute with Tamiya thinner instead?
Any help would be wonderful. I fear I'll run into the same issue with hair spray. Assuming I TOTALLY coat the hull with hairspray, I fear I'll end up with a hull a darker shade than the superstructure, assuming a similar reaction and contamination takes place.
....of course, this could ALL be due to using distilled water for my thinner. Who knows.

 

null_zpscbc038d2.jpg

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Salt dissolves in water, that's the problem. It may be that the drops to set the salt are too much. Try misting the surface and then wipe it almost dry, then place the salt. Let dry and use an oil based paint over it. If you will be using water based paints, maybe try using craft sand. It can be as fine as salt and won't dissolve in any paint we use.

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Guest PetrolGator

Ron,

 

This is what I was afraid of. Still, almost EVERY online tutorial uses acrylics, so I don't know what the deal is. I'm thinking that the distilled water is just allowing the water to take more salt ions into solution. I may try once more with Tamiya thinner and see what happens.

 

Craft sand may be just as easy, seeing as one can simply wipe away the pieces with a brush in the same manner. The paint removal effect of water leads to MUCH smaller pitting than what the salt has so far shown. Sand may also allow more control with placement, which is definitely a desirable trait.

 

I'll experiment with the hairspray technique tonight. I'm not planning on doing any hull painting on the actual model until this weekend, anyway. Honestly, a combination between the salt/sand and hairspray may lead me to the promised land.

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Guest PetrolGator
OK.


Salt Attempt #2:


Modifications: a) Smaller salt size

b) Paint thinned with Tamiya thinner


Woah. Difference makers. My chip size is in scale, and much more controlled. It looks a LITTLE more like my reference pictures, which makes me happy. I've used some washes and pastels to... rust it up a bit, but this is super rough and for proof of concept only. Also, I shot the hull with a lightened shade of the blue grey I'm using.... just for effect.


Opinions?




null_zpsb1c203be.jpg

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Guest PetrolGator

OK. Here's the "hairspray" stuff I tried. Note that I totally messed up the top of the hull in my haste, so, I've covered it up.

 

null_zpsb82bb5e7.jpg

 

Pros: I have a little more control over WHERE I chip it.

 

Con: Well, control. One has to be REAL careful not to overdo it.

 

Again, I've added some light dulling and weathering for giggles.

 

Oh, and I also dulled out the original to see how I like it:

 

null_zps011c4da9.jpg

 

Alright. Opinions are really, really appreciated. Tear it apart!

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A good primer on paint chipping. Thanks. I have used salt a few times on planes and pretty much used a salt paste. I didn't apply any water to the model, just the paste.

 

A comment, the first photo with the rings around the chips sure makes for a weathered looking model. Maybe you want to explore using that method again with more control.

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Guest PetrolGator

If I could get it to precipitate out of solution and make white rings, it would be utterly perfect. If I could get it to form a "wet" looking area around where the wake was impacting the hull, that would be something.

 

Thanks, Clare. I'll have to keep messing on my canvas here.

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