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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/01/2022 in Posts

  1. Tamiya 1/72 Chance-Vought F4U-1A Corsair. Piloted by LT(jg) Doris "Chico" Freeman, VF-17 Jolly Rogers. He would claim two victories with VF-17 and an additional seven with VF-84. Improvements include: Quinta Studios Cockpit. Aires Landing Flaps. Ceramic Wire Antenna. Blanked off Trailing Edges. EagleCals decals. The oil tapes and wing walks are Tamiya decals from the kit, and were the worst Tamiya decals I've ever used. Shattered, tore, etc. The oil tapes are silvered around the edges, despite my best efforts. Oh, well...on to the next one.
    2 points
  2. Hi Gang. I'm Jeff and I just joined today. I'm primarily a large scale aircraft modeller, 1/32 scale and larger if available. My subject area is American aircraft of WWII and Korean War. I hope to learn some new tips and techniques for better modelling.
    1 point
  3. As I move into the third week of the A-7E Corsair II I detailed the port side main gear bay. There is a panel of nine gauges. The kit version just has them portrayed as rings so I made the panel and gauges from scratch then hooked up all the lines to them. I added a few more lines as well as the other power line that will run down the landing gear into the display base. Next I turned my attention to the port avionics bay. Many of the avionics had lines marking the handles. I removed these and then using some small staples I cut and bent them to make the handles. I then drilled holes to fit the 32 awg wires to represent the electrical cables for the equipment. I then made some small label decals for the equipment. I used the reference photo to duplicate these. The reference photos show a green tank (Oxygen?) in the forward section. I used a fishing weight and some PE scraps to replicate the tank and then scratch built another piece of equipment. While certain steps were drying I located the parts for the landing light that sit on one of the main gear doors. I drilled a slot on the rear side and inserted a PICO size LED and used acrylic gel to glue it into the back of the light bezel. I painted the inside with chrome silver then put the clear lens on it. I am now starting to work on the starboard side avionics bay. I started by removing some molded in details to replace them with the equipment shown in my reference photos. Once this is completed I then need to start on the intake, nose gear bay, and the exhaust which is getting me closer to assembling the fuselage together. More details and photos can be seen from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/1-32-a-7e-corsair-ii-va-37-the-bulls/
    1 point
  4. Homemade vac-form rigs can be made from stuff found around the house: I made this little "mini-former", but never made the perforated base plate for it. Some PC prototyping board would work well. A simple plunge-former just consists of a piece of plywood with a slightly oversize hole cut for the master to pass through: The trick is you need to plunge from the side the sheet plastic is, so I use the light from the flame to "see" where the hole in the plywood is. HTH
    1 point
  5. This is the Heller D-Day Sherman kit, which comes with the deep wading trunks. It's an excellent kit in and of itself and has many options such as different pattern road wheels, drive sprockets, transmission covers, etc. I chose to do a later production M-4 and I used the two hatch turret from the Italeri kit, which fit perfectly. I cut down the wading trunks as most pictures I have seen of British Shermans do not have the ones with the curved tops. The only other addition I made was the hull machine gun and main gun waterproof tarps and the stowage on the back deck. The seaweed is tissue soaked in white glue. I coated the bottom of the tank with Johnson's Kleer to make it look wet from just wading in and also put some on the shingle to simulate a 'water line'. The figures are the weakest part. I just can't master making these little guys look good.
    1 point
  6. So over the past several days I’ve started painting. I used Gunze Aqueos RLM 78 for the undersides. Which turned out ok over the dark primer Then Gunze Aqueous FA 34102 for the topside base green… which had minimal tonal contrast over the dark gray primer in the lighting of my work area. It really doesn’t show up in the photos The speckling is there in sunlight to the Mk.I eyeball, but not so visible here. And in the meantime, research turned up that the kit markings for Pokryshkin’s mount, White 5, was an early production Mig-3, while this kit is a late production Mig-3. So a bit more research turned up another Mig-3 that he flew, White 67, which was a late production model. And it was also in a two tone Green & Black scheme, so I used Tamiya Semi Gloss Black, masked with Silly Putty for the hard edge pattern. Not too much farther to go now…
    1 point
  7. This is an old Verlinden figure and a full body bag from a bootleg maker. The 101st patch came from an old IPMS contest sheet, back in 1982, I think. Painted with enamels. An old friend and former IPMS member, Jerry Taylor, was a medic with the 101st in Vietnam. He was the inspiration for this vignette. Dak
    1 point
  8. Moving onto the second week I continued working on the instrument panel by building the light box. I am using a 3mm red LED mounted thru the bottom. The front was detail painted for the switches, knobs, and markings. I then assembled, detailed and painted the resin ejection seat. I also made the decals for the seat warning labels. While the instrument panel assembly and ejection seat were drying I was looking over the other areas that will be illuminated. The recognition lights on many Navy aircraft sit on the nose landing gear. On the A-7 specifically the panel is mounted on the port nose landing gear door. The kit has this panel molded in clear. This made it easier to illuminate. I drilled a 0.25mm hole from the backside halfway into the panel. I then attached three 0.25mm fiber optic lines. On the front side the molded light locations were painted using Tamiya red, green, and yellow clear paints. The fiber optic lines will go to a light box to be mounted later. I did a quick check and the effect worked great. Next was the belly light. The kit has the light molded into the bottom panel. I cut off the “lens” and drilled out the hole. Using a clear styrene tree I cut, trimmed and shaped a new lens. I then mounted a flashing red LED behind the lens. Next I needed to detail the main gear bays. Using reference photos I added the lines and hoses to the port side bay. I also added the aircraft ground point and markings. The wire coiled up in the photos will be one of the power wires for the LED’s. This will travel down the strut replicating the hydraulic line and pass thru the wheel and tire to a spot under the display base. I will add the other power wire on the starboard side gear as well. With all the cockpit assemblies completed I did a test fit into the fuselage. I needed to do some minor trimming of the cockpit tub for the instrument panel light box but everything lined up perfectly. I am now working on detailing the starboard side main gear bay then will need to get the intake and nose wheel bay built and detailed so I can start putting the fuselage together. More details and photos can be seen from the start in my build log at https://davidsscalemodels.com/1-32-a-7e-corsair-ii-va-37-the-bulls/
    1 point
  9. Since joining last year I've been working on some figures to improve my skills in this area. While I also need to improve my skills at model building overall one of my weaknesses that really needed attention is painting figures. My wife and daughter decided to challenge me (why oh why do they do this?) and having never made a diorama one of the pieces came with such a small base I needed to make a larger one. It's very basic and my first attempt for the Hermit Mage and Dog. The other 3 are on their respective bases. The Banshee Queen, The Female Elf Mage and the Necromancer. All of these are 3D printed. I really liked how his book came out. The Elf Mage and Banshee are 75mm Scale while the Necromancer and Hermit are 53mm. More to come....
    1 point
  10. After getting some other projects out of the way, I decided to finally tackle this one. The kit itself went together very well without any issues. I was pleasantly surprised to see how detailed the gear bays were. I added Aires cockpit ,Reskit wheels, PJ Productions resin pilot, and SAC metal landing gear. Everything was pre/post shaded using Tamiya Acrylics. I took a different approach to the base. I normally use sandpaper to simulate the surface. Because the original decking was constructed of planks, and later covered with a non slip surface, I used plastic sheet with strips cut into it so that you could see the planks through the new surface. Any feedback is much appreciated. Cheers Chris
    1 point
  11. I know it's August, but I did complete these two on July 31st. These are my latest helicopters: AH-1G Early model by Special Hobby: AH-1G Late by AZ Models: I don't know how accurate these are but I did my best to at least utilize the early parts on the early version and the late parts on the late version. Thanks for looking in, comments are welcome.
    1 point
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