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USN Flying Boat Antiglare Panel Clor

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HY

 

I need a word of wisdom concerning the color used on USN flying boat antiglare panels for aircraft in the 1950's era. My memory, with no obvious reference source, leads me to believe that the correct color is a flat version of the basic airfarame color, generally sea blue. Any thoughts or a confirmation of this approach would be appreciated.

 

Richard

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HY

 

I need a word of wisdom concerning the color used on USN flying boat antiglare panels for aircraft in the 1950's era. My memory, with no obvious reference source, leads me to believe that the correct color is a flat version of the basic airfarame color, generally sea blue. Any thoughts or a confirmation of this approach would be appreciated.

 

Richard

 

According to Maj Elliot's Official Monogram of US Navy and Marine Corps Aircraft Color Guide there are several schemes in use:

 

SR-2f (on 1/2/1947) directed the repainting of all Naval aircraft to be painted Glossy Sea Blue (A/N-623 later FS15042). Non-spectaular paint was to be applied to know down sun glare... so Flat Sea Blue (A/N-607 or FS35042)

 

SR-202 (on 8/3/1953) allowed for the repainting of the tops of aircraft which operated in a predominantly tropical environment. This allowed for the application of a non-glare panel of either flat black (FS37038) or flat engine gray (FS36081).

 

MIL-C-18263(Aer) (on 2/23/1955) dictated the painting of all seaplanes into "Seaplane Gray" (FS26081 - semigloss Engine Gray!) with the allowance for an anti-glare panel, once again in either black or flat engine gray.

 

MIL-C-18263A(Aer) dictated the White over Gray/Blue established in the earlier order as a way to dimish solar heating of the aircraft. This order allows for the anti-glare panels using flat black (apparently to be applied at the discretion of the unit as it isn't universal).

 

The S2F in the blue scheme has been much more documented and clear evidence of either a flat black or engine gray anti-glare panel.

 

I had just looked up some other info and knew exactly where to find what you wanted. I was researching why F2Hs in a film had areas of bare metal... the answer was right in with your info. It was a test program to decide if natural metal aircraft would work on carriers.

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Jim

 

Thanks for your rapid reply to my request for information on flying boat anti-glare panels. I have Elliott's marking books, Vol 1 & 2 and did find the source you identified in your reply as associated with Spec SR-2f. I must have missed it when I made my initial scan of Vol 2. Thanks for the update.

 

I could not find any of the other specs addressing the anti-glare colors but I do not need that data at this time.

 

If you are going to the IPMS NAtional in Phoenix in August you will, I hope see exactly where your supporting data will have been reflected on my flying boat model. It probably will not be any type of a winner but it will be fairly unique.

 

Richard

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Part of the info is from Vol 3 which covers the 50s.

 

I hope to go to Phoenix. The plans are in flux cuz of the decision of our school board to start school on Aug 2nd, which scuttled our family vacation plans! Money is also a factor, of course.

 

 

 

Jim

 

Thanks for your rapid reply to my request for information on flying boat anti-glare panels. I have Elliott's marking books, Vol 1 & 2 and did find the source you identified in your reply as associated with Spec SR-2f. I must have missed it when I made my initial scan of Vol 2. Thanks for the update.

 

I could not find any of the other specs addressing the anti-glare colors but I do not need that data at this time.

 

If you are going to the IPMS NAtional in Phoenix in August you will, I hope see exactly where your supporting data will have been reflected on my flying boat model. It probably will not be any type of a winner but it will be fairly unique.

 

Richard

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