Jump to content
burner12

Help with drybrushing

Recommended Posts

I'm currently building the revell 1/48f-5e. I got an aftermarket cockpit and have been studying photos, and the console is grey but the gauges are black with white needles.

So I'm trying to figure out how to do a triple drybrush. Painting the whole thing grey then drybrushing black and finally white. But don't want to have one coat cover the other, and read that on some website, I forgot which, that said to add future to make some gauges gloss. Any ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paint the cockpit grey, use thinned black paint & use a toothpick to paint the gauges. Then dry brush the white and add the Future with a clean toothpick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also use a colored pencil (white or cream) to gently go over the needle detail after painting the guage black. Then use future or clear gloss on the dial. The pencil gives a whole lot of control.

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have to go over the needles multiple times with a pencil?

Tim are you saying drybrush with thinned black, how thin would you recommend?

and I have seen cockpits that are grey but have small boxes that are painted black,while keeping the base color grey. do you do that by masking around the area you are painting?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard:

 

Paint the panel gray. Either use a toothpick or fine brush to put a drop of black on the dials and let it dry. You can then drubrush the gauge/numbers or use a colored pencil. Silver or white lookgood. Flat coat the entire panel and then use a toothpick or brush to add a drop of gloss clear tot he dials to get a look like it has glass on it. Couple truies and you'll be a pro and it looks great.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave, what if you are trying to paint only an MFD black, and avoid the grey. would you mask around it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I paint the gray first and seal it with flat. I use acrylic black to paint the MFD/dials. If I miss (and i do), I use a paint brush with the original color and touch it up. Once done, seal Again and for MFD, I use transparent green over the black. It gives it gloss and a light green sheen to simulate the screen (when its off). Gloss coat the rest

 

Here's a couple I did for the IPMS Reviewer Corps

 

http://web.ipmsusa3.org/sites/default/files/reviews/f-16i-sufa/img_0245.jpg

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

 

Sorry to confuse you, like some else said above, paint the dials black then dry brush the white onto the gauges. I wouldn't use silver as the numbers and dial arms are white.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

 

Usually once or twice with the colored pencil works out well. You can use it for some othere effects also, ie...artificial horizon, half blue/ half black. Silver pencil for small chips or nat metal bezels, etc. Experiment with different colors, you can even blend them together. Dry brushing results with the whole area a little bit painted while the pencil can be used with little more precision in my opinion.

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

 

Sorry to confuse you, like some else said above, paint the dials black then dry brush the white onto the gauges. I wouldn't use silver as the numbers and dial arms are white.

Richard,

 

Usually once or twice with the colored pencil works out well. You can use it for some othere effects also, ie...artificial horizon, half blue/ half black. Silver pencil for small chips or nat metal bezels, etc. Experiment with different colors, you can even blend them together. Dry brushing results with the whole area a little bit painted while the pencil can be used with little more precision in my opinion.

 

Bill

 

No problem Tim would you recommend masking around the area that'll be drybrushed?

Bill how sharp should the pencil be, to a point? Cause I'd think if it was sharpened to a point when using it it'd chip off a little

Edited by burner12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

 

I like to make a chisel point; that way you have two surfaces. The sharp point and a flat side. I take an x-acto blade and scrape it down to flatten it and sharpen it both. The lead is firm enough that it holds up well. I use "Prismacolor" pencils.

 

Good luck.

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking outside the box. How well would a black sharpie work? Seems like there might be more control with it, i don't know or have any experience using one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Masking the gauges would be a royal pain in the - - -, just be careful with your drybrushing. I think a Sharpie would be "too heavy" with the black, the white pencl idea is your best best, they are cheap at Micheals and last a long time, I've had mine for over 20 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several thoughts......

 

First, don't confuse drybrushing with detail painting. Drybrushing works perfectly for highlighting raised details, but not for covering larger surfaces. Thus drybrushing white onto the needles and gauge marks works well as they are only raised lines; where as drybrushing the actual raised guages (the squares and rectangles) does not, since drybrushing would accent their edges, but not cover their entire surface. For that, you need to detail paint. Another way to mark the needels is to use a white colored pencil, rubbing them gently over the raised lines. You can even cut the tip to make the point into a blunt tipped cone (the cone tip being slightly smaller than the diameter of a guage interior) and hold the pencil perpendicular to the panel while marking the needles. This is more tedious, but also less likely to get the white on surrounding guage surfaces.

 

Detail painting guages is tedious. A 000 brush, magnification, good paint (that doesn't dry too fast on the brush), and a steady hand are all that's needed! A VERY fine point Sharpie can also work well (with magnification and a steady hand), but its black color will look "glossy" or "greasy" compared to paint, so you'll have to flat coat the panel if you use this method (and do so BEFORE adding the gloss drops for the guage faces!).

 

One other method is to paint the panel gray, then mask off GROUPS of guages and paint them black, and then use the back of a fine knife blade to gently scrape the black off between the guages to reveal the gray paint underneath, making for fine gray lines around the black guages. This can work well on panels with lots of symetrical guages in neat groupings.

 

For the clear guage faces you can use clear gloss paint, Future, or clear epoxy. The paint and the Future may require 2-3 applications per guage due to shrinkage, especially for larger scale panels. The epoxy usually requires only one application, but if you overfill a guage it can dry leaving a bulged face guage instead of the flat glass surface you want! Also, if you use 5 minute epoxy, you have about 3 minutes before it starts to set and "string", so it requires care against that.

 

With all of the work needed, is it any wonder that the pre-painted panels from Eduard are so popular? Hope this helps!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Edited by ghodges

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...