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Which Glue Would You Use?


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I've got to attach a plastic model base to a wooden base for a project...

 

I've thought about Aves ApoxySculpt, Cyanoacrylate, and Gator Grip Hobby Glue.

 

Does anyone have any experience with attaching plastic to wood? Which glue would you use??

 

Thanks!

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For dissimilar materials CA will always work, but if you need a stronger, more permanent bond, try Weldbond (it's like space-age elmers- dries clear)

http://www.weldbond.com/

or try Beacon's 3-in-1 Advanced Craft Glue

http://www.beaconadhesives.com/cgthree.html - you know how hot glue is heat-activated? Well this stuff is hot glue that is air-activated- so it becomes solid as it dries, not as it cools

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Does anyone have any experience with attaching plastic to wood? Which glue would you use??

 

If you've got two big flat surfaces to mate - or you can arrange for that by gluing sheet styrene to the bottom of the base - I'd use hardware store 5 minute epoxy. This has the advantage that you don't need to run the glue along the edge of the base and have it ooze out on the wood.

 

Or if you can hide it somehow, run a small flat head wood screw through the base and into the wood.

 

Don

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I'd also go the 5min epoxy route. It's strong enough to secure plastic to wood, and it's something that you can also use to create lights and to make the "glass" on instrument panels. It's a tough, strong glue that (generally) doesn't attack plastic.

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Try Tack spray glue. It is use to bond laminate counter top material to wood when making counter tops. You find it is a spray can at any local home store.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Good suggestions, but what exactly are you attaching to (exactly) what?

 

For example, if you are placing a heavy object on the plastic base (such as a large a/c model or ship) you might consider bolting the plastic to the wood. (I'm thinking a display pylon for an aircraft, here). Double ended machine or lag bolts will do the job. Machine bolts are best. Counter sink the bottom openings in the wood for the nuts and don't forget to use a washer.

 

Super glue should be the last option.

 

If you are mating up two large flat surface then Weldbond is a good option. It does look like Elmer's but it is definitely not. if you can control the size of the plastic base then making it larger and triming after bonding will save alignment problems.

 

Liquid or spray contact cement is also a very good choice, Problem is that you better have everything lined up and start from one end or corner and work outward when mating the two surfaces or you will have the parts mis-aligned and could trap air-pockets. With contact cement if you get those faults it is just too bad. It's permanent and not adjustable.

 

Whatever you decide remember that mating surface prep is of paramount importance to get a good bond with maximum strength. Clamping or adding weight to the flat surfaces will help to assure a good bond.

Edited by TheWalrus
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Thanks, Everyone, for your help. I used two part epoxy…just seemed the simplest and strongest method. I wasn’t worried too much about ooze, as any would be covered…

 

Here is the finished project…

 

HobbyBoss_SovietArmoredRailCar_post2.jpg

Edited by Keith Pruitt
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Nice job.

Thanks!!

 

Good adhesive choice. Must have been a pain getting an even spread to entire bonding surface. Did you use your wife's spatula? :smiley29:

Nope...just a craft stick...the round edge actually worked nicely to spread the epoxy evenly and smoothly...actually surprised me!!

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Had I known details of your application in this case I would have recommended 3-M 's Spray Adhesive Type 77. Spray it on both mating surfaces, wait 30-sec's or so and mate them together. Just be sure to start at a corner or edge length and work to opposite end. when bonding. Helps get rid of air pockets (bubbles). It's easier to use than resin for this type of app.

 

There is another version which is not permanent, but rather lo-tack and it's good if you may want to remove or take the pieces apart in the future.

Edited by TheWalrus
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