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What aircraft is this?


Scooter
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It is Dutch registry, but that does not necessarily mean it was built in Holland. Having said that, I think it is a post-WWII civil project by Anthony Fokker. I will consult my Fokker references when I get home. Nick Filippone

 

 

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I tried to reply to this once, but it did not post. I guess I am still on the learning curve with the new format. I believe this is a post-WWII Anthony Fokker project. I believe I have info on this in a privately published book on the "Cruader" which also covered just about every twin-boom aircraft built. When I get home from work, I will check. Nick Filippone

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It's a Stearman-Hammond Y.1S (aka Y.150S,) one of 14 built, including two which went to the US Navy. PH-APY was ferried, by ship, to Holland, arriving 24-9-37. It was sold to the RAF 30-5-39, and scrapped in February, 1942. No, I'm not a smart-a___ know-all; I Googled the registration letters. :rolleyes:

Edgar

Wonder what the RAF wanted it for?

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Googling the code, indeed. Very sneaky. Indeed, in the book by Alexander Roca entitled "Crusader, The Story of the Shelton Flying Wing," there are two nice pictures of this aircraft. One carries the U.S. code NC15525 and has the name(the Pilot's or owner's?)- R.P. Bowman over the cockpit. In the other, the configuration is a little different in that there is no intake over the cockpit. Rather, there is simply a fairing in front of the engine that begins behind the cabin. Also, the shape of the vertical stabilizers and rudders are different. The only discernible marking is what appears to be "NS 73" on the vertical tail.The aircraft was originally ordered by the U.S. commerce Dept. It was the winner of the government's affordable aircraft contest of 1935.The story of how one found it's way to Holland would be interesting. Fokker did produce an aircraft of rather similar configuration after the war called the F-25 Promotor. Although it it a rather more attractive, it is so similar that one might wonder if it influenced Anthony Fokker in its design. John W. Burns "Plastic Aircraft Kits of the Twentieth Century" does not list a kit of this aircraft. "Aircraft Yearbook 3-View Drawings- 1903-1945" has a simple 3-view. Regards, Nick Filippone

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OK...now, guess this aircraft! And before you say it doesn't belong here...wait'll you learn who built it!

 

SinsheimMuseumDEC2004557.jpg

 

SinsheimMuseumDEC2004558.jpg

 

SinsheimMuseumDEC2004559.jpg

 

Easy - that's a Messerschmitt! My dad restored one back in the seventies. It even has a side-opening canopy, just like the real thing!

 

We always used to joke that it was slower than a Spitfire, but had a better turn radius! (Triumph Spitfire, that is!!)

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Hello all... anyone know what this thing is perhaps? And (gulp)..any known kits of any type?

 

Thanks in advance..

 

Adam

 

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Adam, I think this Stearman-Hammond has some possible connection as a predecessor to the Fokker F.25 Promoter. Look at this web site and you'll see the "family resemblance".

http://library.thinkquest.org/C002752/fokker.cgi?page=db/f25

 

You might have better luck finding the Fokker model than a Stearman-Hammond model.

I hope it helps in your search. Good luck.

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