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Does weather hurt modeling?

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I have come to a crisis in my modeling that I don't think I've ever heard of before. The weather has actually caused me to stop building for a while. See, I live in lovely, hot, HUMID North Carolina. My 'work bench' is in my garage. My garage is not insulated, heated or air conditioned. I might as well be outside. The high humidity does weird things to the paint in that IT DOESN"T DRY!!! Painted some parts last night and a truck frame early this morning and they are still sticky.:smiley21: The only solution is to only build on low humidity days--November, December, winter--, wait a really long time to handle parts, oooorrrrr, I could take over the kitchen table, hhhhmmmmmmm. Has anyone else had to quit because of weather? I'm really only venting, but it is FRUSTRATING!!

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Yea it does. That is why I love my wife for allowing me a man cave. On hot days, I still have to be careful of painting. Humidity also affects super glue drying time.

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Concur with all the humidity issues cited above. Also watch for its effects on the airbrush...you want a water trap!

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I feel your pain, I live in south carolina and for awhile I had to paint in my garage. Now thanks to my sweetie, I got a spray booth so now I can spray indoors. You cant do any modeling for about 3 1/2 months. dry.gif

 

 

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Our house is one of those 90s style houses with a formal living room. Since we're not formal living room type folks, it's become my "dad cave". I do some modeling and online gaming here.

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Living in Central Tx with temps in the mid to high 90s and humidity above 85% most of the time. The weather does not seem to impact the quality of my work, but then that is more of a statement about the rather dismal level of work I produce even under the best of conditions.

 

I have a fan and an open garage door. About the only time I do not airbrush is when its raining and it hasn't done that but once in 70 days or so.

 

Moving the workspace indoors is not a possibility.

 

Oh well.

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I'm in the same boat Jim! I live in Florida, and build and paint in my uninsulated 2-car garage. I have 2 solutions for you:

 

1) Start using nitrogen for you air supply. Invest in a 3ft tall gas bottle with a good regulator. It'll last for about 8-10 1/48 scale paint jobs (more, if you use your old compressor to clean the airbrush with instead of the air supply). It's inexpensive to refill, AND (best of all) there's NEVER any moisture in the line because there's no moisture in the supply!

 

2) Buy a "portable" a/c unit (Lowes, Home Depot has 'em) It sits on wheels, connects to any window nearby (without tools), runs on regular 120 volt house current, and doesn't need to have a drain line (unless you set it on dehumidifier). The cost will depend on how big your garage is (sq.ftge to be cooled), and they run from $250-$400. However, if I turn mine on in the morning when I leave for work, it will have my side of the garage at a tolerable 87-88 degrees, even though it's hit 95 outside that day. And, it does lower the humidity too!

 

You're going to have to invest some money IF you truly want to build year-round out there. But, if that's your goal, and you can't move your bench inside, then at least the above offers some relief. Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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2) Buy a "portable" a/c unit (Lowes, Home Depot has 'em) It sits on wheels, connects to any window nearby (without tools), runs on regular 120 volt house current, and doesn't need to have a drain line (unless you set it on dehumidifier). The cost will depend on how big your garage is (sq.ftge to be cooled), and they run from $250-$400. However, if I turn mine on in the morning when I leave for work, it will have my side of the garage at a tolerable 87-88 degrees, even though it's hit 95 outside that day. And, it does lower the humidity too!

 

You could also make a temporary "room" around your workbench out of bed sheets, tarps or plastic drop cloth. It creates a smaller area to cool and should save you a few dollars. In a confined space, it is easier to dehumidify, also.

 

Good luck!

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Hey, Jim .... same issue on the coast, sort of. While my workbench and hairy stick paint area is inside in conditioned space, my spray booth is in what I call semi-conditioned space (there is one vent doing not much). What I do is then haul what I've spray painted into the house to dry in some safe corner.

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I live on the eastern side of the 'corn patch' (Iowa) , in the MIssissippi valley, and while we don't have "air you can wear" like in NC, it do get a bit sticky. I've been using acrylics for a long time now, and I don't have any painting problems.

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Here in Denver, Colorado, we have such low humidity and mostly mild weather, that one can model and airbrush in the house (with proper ventilation) or in a garage all year. I'm lucky that I have a nice basement to work in. Always cool there in the summer. About the only time I have to be careful when airbrushing is when the clothes dryer is running, then it can, on rare occasions, cause water to build up in the airbrush. I have a water trap that has cured that issue. I've never had to model in a garage, and I suppose that that could get a bit chilly in the winter. It has been rainy here. This is one of Colorado's rainiest Mays, but I haven't had a problem with anything not drying. I suppose in other states in the Southwest, Arizona for example, it would be the same. (You'd really need A/C there though). I think I'll stay here.

Doug

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My spray booth is on a table I set up in the laundry room, where the furnace and air conditioner are also located. I always have heat or air, depending on the season. I connect my flexible exhaust hose from the spray booth to the dryer hose outlet duct, so all my paint fumes go outside through the foundation wall. When I'm done, I reconnect the dryer to the outlet duct. This sharing works out well when I understand that the clothes dryer comes first in priority.

 

Ed

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What????? Clothes drying has priority of model painting? Never heard of such nonsense! haha

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This sharing works out well when I understand that the clothes dryer comes first in priority.

 

Ed

 

It would also work out well if you remember to not connect the spray booth to the dryer ...

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I have come to a crisis in my modeling that I don't think I've ever heard of before. The weather has actually caused me to stop building for a while. See, I live in lovely, hot, HUMID North Carolina. My 'work bench' is in my garage. My garage is not insulated, heated or air conditioned. I might as well be outside. The high humidity does weird things to the paint in that IT DOESN"T DRY!!! Painted some parts last night and a truck frame early this morning and they are still sticky.:smiley21: The only solution is to only build on low humidity days--November, December, winter--, wait a really long time to handle parts, oooorrrrr, I could take over the kitchen table, hhhhmmmmmmm. Has anyone else had to quit because of weather? I'm really only venting, but it is FRUSTRATING!!

 

I think I have solved my problem. At least temporarily. I found a paint in the local Pep Boys that works great. It is Dupli-Color Perfect Match. Now, I'm sure some of you other modelers have used this, especialy car guys but I love it. Started with Honda aluminum and this stuff looks and feels like metal. Dries fast and hard and goes on evenly. I'm not sure if there are any colors that would work for armor or aircraft, but this summer while I work on boats and auto stuff I will use it.

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