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Rules regarding chemicals, sprays, etc.


SeaDog101
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Are there any IPMS rules regarding using/not using chemicals, sprays, solvents, etc. on models to enhance the appearence and/or create other special effects? I'm not talking about paints here, but something else.

For example: Let's say a modeler builds a diorama of a farm that has an apple tree orchard. And then that modeler might use some sort of "apple scented spray" or air freshener, etc. to spray on the apple trees as an added "special effect" to make the apple orchard a bit more realistic so to speak.

Are there any rules against such substances?

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No rules as far as I am awhere. As for the sray to give it the smell of the apples. Great idea, go for it. That one I haven't heard of before. Way to think out of the box. IPMS does not punish you for coming up with great Ideas, we may steal it and use it on our next buld and claim it as ours, but never punish. You keep these Ideas coming. We (modelers) are taking notes.

 

Chris

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Do we really want to encourage scented Dioramas? Do we really want to be walking by this figure and have smell-o-vision?

 

relief.jpg

 

 

HAHA

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  • 1 year later...

There are no rules preventing the use of scents on models, but then again, you may be entering an area with more minuses than pluses...

 

First, how do you add a scent AND control its strength? You want to have enough to be sure it's noticed, but too much could cause a negative reaction or distract the viewer from the scene to the scent; making it a detriment instead of an enhancement.

 

Second, scents react differently to different environments. If you add it in the air-conditioned comfort of your bench, and then transport it in the summer heat of your car, what does that do to it? Does it return to normal in the show room environment? Has it worn off over the time between building and showing? Do you need to "freshen" the scent from time to time, and how does that application affect the pieces in the diorama (dissolve paints? discolor/stain finishes? too strong when newly refreshed?)?

 

Third, there's always the rare chance that someone could be allergic to the scent you add, whether its a chemical allergy or a natural allergy to that particular substance (like peanuts). What are the ramifications for the builder and the host if THAT happens?

 

I think the items listed above are the reason you don't see "scented" models at shows. It's not that it hasn't been thought of, it's just the the potential rewards are miniscule compared to the work and risks involved. Still, if you think it's something that could greatly benefit your work and you can balance out the potential problems, go for it!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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There are no rules preventing the use of scents on models, but then again, you may be entering an area with more minuses than pluses...

 

First, how do you add a scent AND control its strength? You want to have enough to be sure it's noticed, but too much could cause a negative reaction or distract the viewer from the scene to the scent; making it a detriment instead of an enhancement.

 

Second, scents react differently to different environments. If you add it in the air-conditioned comfort of your bench, and then transport it in the summer heat of your car, what does that do to it? Does it return to normal in the show room environment? Has it worn off over the time between building and showing? Do you need to "freshen" the scent from time to time, and how does that application affect the pieces in the diorama (dissolve paints? discolor/stain finishes? too strong when newly refreshed?)?

 

Third, there's always the rare chance that someone could be allergic to the scent you add, whether its a chemical allergy or a natural allergy to that particular substance (like peanuts). What are the ramifications for the builder and the host if THAT happens?

 

I think the items listed above are the reason you don't see "scented" models at shows. It's not that it hasn't been thought of, it's just the the potential rewards are miniscule compared to the work and risks involved. Still, if you think it's something that could greatly benefit your work and you can balance out the potential problems, go for it!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Gil, it also begs th question of the accuracy in scale of a particular scent. For example would anyone notice if a 1/32 tank in a forest diorama's scent was in 1/48 scale? For that matter how do you "scale" a scent? What if one of the rivet counters declares that the scent is a of a Blue Spruce when the forest is clearly consisting of Douglas Firs? Like everything, it gets complicated the more you think about it.
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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Perhaps the odor of whatever glue one uses, or the recently applied coats of paint will outweigh all other considerations.

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