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David is right, silver or aluminum is the best color to reveal flaws. That's why natural metal finished models are so tough to do right; you have to elminate every little scratch!

 

I'd like to recommend the rattle can (spray can) Tamiya Very Fine Primers. It comes in gray or white; the white being slightly finer and smoother. Both go on smoothly, dry in 30mins or less, and are good for checking you seam work as well as apllying an even base coat for you finishing colors.

 

Another need is a strong bright light. Hold the model up and sight along the questionable seam towards the light. Move the model slightly to get the light to reflect along the seam. This will help you see imperfections, even if you haven't applied any primer yet. Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I try to use the "light" test mentioned above as I am building. IF I can get some building time during daylight hours, I usually hold the kit to the window to see what work is needed. When I am ready to paint, I also use the silver marker to see what final touch work needs to be done.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest Chrgr440RT

I use the silver sharpie method too. But sometimes the shrpie jsut doesn't always give good coverage. In these cases I use white out. It wil show areas where the seam needs to be filled and will actually fill small cracks. It sands easily and takes paint well.

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I just wipe some Mr Seam on there and it's all set. No sanding, filling or anything. It's ready to go! :smiley20:

 

:smiley17:

 

I usually use Mr Surfacer 1000 since it dries so fast. I will have to give the silver sharpie a try. Obviously it doesn't mess up the final paint job if so many are using it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

James and all: I've had some problems with the black Sharpies....I like to make the black stripes on a white tailhook with a finepoint Sharpie; much easier than painting. However, you have to let it dry for a day and thenl ightly flat coat it, or the ink will run. You have to be more careful with gloss coats since you generally apply them "wet", and that'll cause the blank ink to run. I think that's the main reason you've never seen people do preshading with a Sharpie....it's the easiest method, but it either runs or bleeds therough the next coast of paint!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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James and all: I've had some problems with the black Sharpies....I like to make the black stripes on a white tailhook with a finepoint Sharpie; much easier than painting. However, you have to let it dry for a day and thenl ightly flat coat it, or the ink will run. You have to be more careful with gloss coats since you generally apply them "wet", and that'll cause the blank ink to run. I think that's the main reason you've never seen people do preshading with a Sharpie....it's the easiest method, but it either runs or bleeds therough the next coast of paint!

 

GIL :smiley16:

 

Tell me about it !!! When I did my Swordfish review I wanted the hand-painted look of the 816 Sqn invasion stripes -- thought a Sharpie just the thing to do the fine outline of the white end stripes on the fuselage !!! Spent several days repairing that !!!

 

John

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