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MicroMark Photo Studio


Mark Aldrich
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Mark,

I bought one at Walmart that looks just like this one, except for the camera stand, for $50. I'd shop around before taking the plunge for $90 plus shipping.

Mark

 

I have the Walmart studio too. It does an OK job but it's to small IMO.

Kent

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Something that bugs me about the current crop of cameras is that unless you take the plunge for something pretty pricey, you can't get a remote shutter release. That means man-handling your camera to take the picture, which means movement, which means blurring, especially with extreme close-ups. I've got a tri-pod I can use, but the camera still moves if you have to put your hand on it to push the shutter.

 

Of course, it doesn't help that the shutter is now the size of a pin head and my fingers are now the size of sausages!

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Use the self timer- if your camera has one that is.

Something that bugs me about the current crop of cameras is that unless you take the plunge for something pretty pricey, you can't get a remote shutter release. That means man-handling your camera to take the picture, which means movement, which means blurring, especially with extreme close-ups. I've got a tri-pod I can use, but the camera still moves if you have to put your hand on it to push the shutter.

 

Of course, it doesn't help that the shutter is now the size of a pin head and my fingers are now the size of sausages!

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Yep! My camera has 2 self-timer settings; one for 2secs and one for 10secs. Simply set the camera on the tripod, focus in, set the timer you want, and push the button. This eliminates any motion and allows you to use slower exposure times, more light, and no flash!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Yes, that is the Walmart one with the addition of a camera stand. It is less than $50, so get it at Walmart. It will hold everything up to a small 4-engine 72nd scale a/c.

 

I have started using the 2 sec shutter delay and it makes a big difference in the photos.

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Mark,

Agreed! How do you like it for photographing your work?

 

 

Mark,

I like it very much. It is the perfect size for taking pictures of my tanks. Using it for 1/48 and larger planes may be another story. And, I didn't mentiuon ships : )

Mark

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  • 2 weeks later...

A couple of years ago I was recruited by Model Cars Magazine to be their PNW photographer, On the advice of their SoCal photographer I went and bought about $40 worth of 1/2" PVC pipe and fittings to build a photo booth. At the local art supply store I bought a roll of 36" wide Song Writer's Bond. From Wally world I bought 4 clip lights along with 'Sun Light' florescent bulbs and a couple a packages of white tissue paper, the kind that you wrap or stuff in packages. The tissue acts as the diffuser for the lights. The size of the whole thing can be extended or reduced by replacing the PVC with shorter or longer pipes, of course you change the roll of paper. The one thing I need to add is an additional incandescent bulb to help bring all the light together. With the 36" wide roll I can photograph 1/25th scale Big Rigs and up to 1/8th scale autos.

 

IMG_3644-vi.jpg

IMG_3645-vi.jpg

IMG_3646-vi.jpg

IMG_3647-vi.jpgHosted on Fotki

 

The use of an adjustable tripod and the timed exposure is the only way to go, especially if your camera is in Macro Mode.

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Finally made it to Walmart. You goes musthave gotten lucky! The three I went to yesterday did not have them. I checked the website and they do carry it for about $10 less and free shipping to the store of my choice. Sounds like the plan!

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  • 4 months later...

re. "add is an additional incandescent bulb ". Problem ahead. Mixing color temps of flourescent flourexcent (daylight corrected) and incandescent lamps will cause problems with accurate color rendition. Also beware of using your tissue paper diffusers when exposing to high heat of incandescent. You could find your whole house a pile of melted styrene.

 

Also you might want to avoid mixing light sources and being aware of background colors with those mixed color temperature lamps. Post processing for color rdendition will be a nighmare.

 

 

 

A couple of years ago I was recruited by Model Cars Magazine to be their PNW photographer, On the advice of their SoCal photographer I went and bought about $40 worth of 1/2" PVC pipe and fittings to build a photo booth. At the local art supply store I bought a roll of 36" wide Song Writer's Bond. From Wally world I bought 4 clip lights along with 'Sun Light' florescent bulbs and a couple a packages of white tissue paper, the kind that you wrap or stuff in packages. The tissue acts as the diffuser for the lights. The size of the whole thing can be extended or reduced by replacing the PVC with shorter or longer pipes, of course you change the roll of paper. The one thing I need to add is an additional incandescent bulb to help bring all the light together. With the 36" wide roll I can photograph 1/25th scale Big Rigs and up to 1/8th scale autos.

 

IMG_3644-vi.jpg

IMG_3645-vi.jpg

IMG_3646-vi.jpg

IMG_3647-vi.jpgHosted on Fotki

 

The use of an adjustable tripod and the timed exposure is the only way to go, especially if your camera is in Macro Mode.

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Same principle but mine stays assembled in a corner. I uses 2 large sheets of velum sandwiched between two frames made from foam core. This gives me a little softer light and I am less likely to light the lights on fire.

 

 

 

photostudio.jpg

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