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TheWalrus

Rigging

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I recently ran across a rigging matereial that had "stretchy" properties. It could be used for rigging or antenna "wire". Ad said it was not brittle and would handle being bumped. I have not been able to find this product again. Can anyone help?

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I recently ran across a rigging matereial that had "stretchy" properties. It could be used for rigging or antenna "wire". Ad said it was not brittle and would handle being bumped. I have not been able to find this product again. Can anyone help?

 

You may be thinking of EZLine. I saw at the Nats in VA Beach. http://www.bobeshobbyhouse.com/ezl.html

 

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I have some EZline. I tried to use it once without much success. Simply put, trying to put an end into the locating hole for a section of rigging was like trying to shoot pool with a limp piece of spaghetti (to paraphrase George Burns). It may have been ME, but I couldn't get it to work for rigging. I've also HEARD it doesn't react well to superglue. Since you have to stretch it into place and immediately bond it while tensioned, no other glue is really practical. Again, since I couldn't even get it into the locating hole, I don't personally know if the superglue will work or not. That said, I just started a Halberstadt CL.II and I do plan to try it again. I've had the best success rigging with sprue, and some success with very thin monofiliment line; but it's REALLY frustrating when you heat it to tighten it and it breaks in two! :smiley13: The elasticity of the EZLine would solve that problem! Also, I have heard of some modelers that have used it and are very happy with it! Contact Bobe's and give it a try; you'll only be out a few dollars if it doesn't work. Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I have some EZline. I tried to use it once without much success. Simply put, trying to put an end into the locating hole for a section of rigging was like trying to shoot pool with a limp piece of spaghetti (to paraphrase George Burns). It may have been ME, but I couldn't get it to work for rigging. I've also HEARD it doesn't react well to superglue. Since you have to stretch it into place and immediately bond it while tensioned, no other glue is really practical. Again, since I couldn't even get it into the locating hole, I don't personally know if the superglue will work or not. That said, I just started a Halberstadt CL.II and I do plan to try it again. I've had the best success rigging with sprue, and some success with very thin monofiliment line; but it's REALLY frustrating when you heat it to tighten it and it breaks in two! :smiley13: The elasticity of the EZLine would solve that problem! Also, I have heard of some modelers that have used it and are very happy with it! Contact Bobe's and give it a try; you'll only be out a few dollars if it doesn't work. Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

 

And thankyou, too, Gil. I am going to order it and give it a try.

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I use 'invisible thread' from the sewing supplies at HobbyLobby. Have also learned various techniques for putting tension on these materials, such as drill thru the wing, glue & trim in place and sand/seal the far surface to conceal the exit hole. Other ideas include drilling thru the struts, wrapping the thread around the various joints, etc. Sometimes I am quick-witted enough to remember to pre-drill required holes in the fuselage early in the build; other times...not so much.

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I too encountered much difficulty with EZ-Line and super glue. All I had to do were two lines on the U/C of a 1/72nd scale biplane. It turned into a daunting task! But, I was trying to surface glue it like I do with fine wire. This didn't work too well.

 

However, I'm going to give the EZ-Line another go on a bipe. This time I'm going to pre-drill all the holes and see if that makes things easier. I picked up a micro drill index last week and will start in soon.

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Our club recently had a WW I Biplane challenge and members came up with some interesting methods of adding rigging. One member, Larry Cherniak found some flat thread at the local Jo Ann Fabric store. It is made by the Sulky company and is called Sliver Metallic. He drilled holes and glued the thread in place. It had to be straightened out so it was oriented correctly. It looked fantastic. I have a spool of the thread and am working up the nerve.

 

Here is a photo of Larry's model.

 

110408_001.jpg

 

Another member used guitar strings while others used stainless steel wire. More details of the challenge can be found on the club web site; IPMS Kalamazoo

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Guest Bun E. Carlos

TRIED AND TRUE.............STRETCHED SPRUE!!!!!!!!!! USE MONOGRAM SILVER PLASTIC!!!!!!!!!

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The "flat thread" sounds interesting, but how do you get it taut, and what do you glue it in with? Thanks!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Larry used super glue to attach the "flat thread". I haven't tried it yet but I believe that he first fixed them at the fuselage and then feeds them through small holes that he has drilled in the wings. He stretches the thread tight and glues it in place. When everything is dry, he trims the thread off and touches up the painted wing. If a decal is located in the area of the thread hole, he waits until after he finishes the rigging before he applies that decal.

 

It sounds like it really requires some thinking ahead, something that I usually omit. Larry's results really look spectacular though.

 

 

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I've taken to using 0.004" Stainless Wire. I you keep the spool under a bit of tension while pulling off a length it will remove the cast from the spool and lay perfectly straight. I use dividers to measure the length I need to span a bay and then cut the wire to length and secure at each end with a small (TINY) drop of testor's Cement for Clear Plastic. This cement has really good initial tack and holds the wire in place quite well. A little dab of flat black paint and you get a nice turnbuckle effect. I apply the gule with a small piece of stretch sprue handle (that portion left over that you were holding when you stretched the sprue in the first place. That fine tapered tip makes a great glue applicator. My Albatros D-V is posted this week and I've poster my Moraine Saulnier N-1 and Nieuport N-17 both also done with this technique.

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