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AKPilot

Colors Between Scales

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If haven't yet attended a local IPMS meeting due to me only recently becoming interested, and because of the recent mid-west blizzard this past week, but can someone answer a question - more out of curiosity sakes?

 

More than likely I won't be entering competitions, but be building for my own satisfaction.

 

I've briefly read in a Testors Model Masters book, at my LHS, about scale color effect. From what I read, this means that for 1/32 scale the same color will be darker, than say for 1/72. If I'm explaining this correctly, this means that the 1/72 scale would be lighter. Correct?

 

I've found the Stockholm IPMS site, but is there any reference material out there that says, or shows, something to the effect of, "using xxxxxx color, lighten it up by x drops of white"?

 

OR is there a color chart/wheel that shows if using a certain scale, what the color should look like?

 

OR is it simply by using the eye-ball method?

 

 

Just thinking out loud . . .

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Hi Troy: rather than retyping my thoughts on "scale effect", I'll ask you to drop down 10 threads on this topic and read about it under "Painting scale effects".

 

In general, the problem is models are smaller than the real full size item. If you use the actual paint from an F-15 on a 1/48 F-15 it WON'T look the same! Since you want it to look the same, you need to adjust the color of the paint a little (in theory). In the end, you have the right idea, if it looks right, it IS right, no matter how you arrive at that result! Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I have heard (REPEAT HEARD) that some paint manufactures are adjusting the brightness of there paints to take scale effect into consideration. Any truth to this? I can see scale effect between real size and any model size, but I think the effect between 1/32 scale and 1/72 scale would be so minimal that one would probably make it worse by trying to adjust for it.

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