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LAV-R in Afghanistan

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I'm getting ready to do Trumpeter's LAV-R and intend to paint it USMC Sand. Do I need to worry about slat armor, and is this a proper finish.

Thanks

Chuck

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Charles,

A quick look on google yielded no LAVs with slat armor (doesn't mean they aren't using it though). If Marine Corp Sand is the same as Model Master Modern Sand or close, you should be good to go.

 

Mark

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Thanks Mark. I had the same results on google, but thought there might be some first hand knowledge here.

Chuck

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Chuck,

 

Check out individual USMC LAR BN unit websites and look at their galleries. Also, go to Marines.mil and use their photo search.

 

1st LAR BN. Deployed in Afganistan. You see photos of their foot patrols and at least a couple variants of their LAVs as well as use of the MRAP.

 

The vehicles are often used by different units as they rotate in; it's cheaper to just sign the equipment over to the incoming unit. The LAVs retain their NATO tri-color schemes with a heavy layer of dust and dirt. The MRAPs are painted in a desert scheme.

 

Due to the mission of Marine LAR units, you won't see many heavily up-armored or wearing slat armor. The Marines won't use the LAV in a manner similar to the Army's Stryker or Canadian Forces LAV-III. When I was in, I was always with the main body. We were accompanied by Abrams tanks, HMMWVs variously armed used for flank security, rotary aircraft and artillery. We never saw LAVs because their mission required them to be way out in front of us, probing for the enemy and calling us in when they made contact. The only time I ever saw LAVs was in the "tango" training area at Camp Pendleton, at their ramp, and once at 29 Palms when one was broken down and in a rear area.

 

They're required to graduate from the Marines' School of Infantry first before entering the LAV crewman course. The rest of us attended Marine Combat Training (infantry-lite school) before moving on to our MOS schools.

 

The LAV's use in Afghanistan in USMC units is limited. A recent National Geographic special has some Marine commanders indicating they're not used often due to their mission and their light armor, which is nothing against IEDs and the typical man-portable weapons (RPGs) used by enemy combatants. They can serve in convoy duty or in the defensive, safely in a hull defilade position. You'll note the use of ballistic glass and armor "walls" around the top of the turret, used to protect the Marines riding at half-mast in the turret. The Canadians opted to bring in Leopard tanks and we're deploying Marine Abrams tanks to Afghanistan soon.

 

Iraq and Afghanistan:

 

WperC.jpg

 

Djlrt.jpg

 

cYEob.jpg

 

22wWA.jpg

 

s5eiI.jpg

 

Operation Desert Storm:

 

rLgKM.jpg

 

An LAV-L (logistic) tows an LAV-R. It's not uncommon to see the mixture of paint schemes in USMC units, regardless of time, conflict, active or reserve. An AAVP-7A1 towing a MICLIC is in the background.

Edited by FJCook

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And here are ASLAV-25s in service with the Australian Army wearing "BAR armour."

6arcK.jpg

 

Mc6q5.jpg

Edited by FJCook

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Thank you FJ,

Lots of good information there. I'll search some of the USMC sites this weekend, I hadn't thought of that.

Chuck

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This is great info. How different is the Australian ASLAV to the Marine LAV? I'd like to make an Australian one if I could use a Trumpeter LAV to build it if possible.

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This is great info. How different is the Australian ASLAV to the Marine LAV? I'd like to make an Australian one if I could use a Trumpeter LAV to build it if possible.

 

The Australian ASLAV is an LAV-25 (also known as an LAV-II to the Canadian manufacturer), manufactured by the same Canadian company that makes the USMC LAV-A2 and LAV-III serving with Canadian Forces. The major visual differences include camouflage paint pattern and markings, no guard around the marine drive (used for fording; they're not fully amphibious), and an elongated exhaust with no cover. Many upgrades used by the Australian Army are mostly internal such as a new motor for the turret, a/c for the crew compartment, although some laser targeting stuff on the turret's exterior might need to be modeled.

I imagine the paint and markings would a matter of Internet research. Australian ASLAVs saw/see service in East Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan as well in the flood-ravaged areas of Australia recently. The Trumpeter 1/72 LAV-25 is a good start.

Edited by FJCook

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Excellent! Thanks for the info. Now to find some 1/72 scale markings for an Australian ASLAV

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