Jump to content

Recommended Posts

3M Acryl-Blue Glazing Putty, item # 05964, is my putty of choice. This item is standard equipment in auto body shops and is used to fill dents and do the final "repair" on a car before the paint is applied. It comes in a squeeze tube, 21oz, and is a bit on the pricy side in the mid $20 range, but that 21 oz tube will last the average modeler a number of years. I found my most recent tube at Chief Auto Parts but I had to call a number of stores before I found one that had a tube in stock.

 

The putty can be applied directly from the tube without thinning, having the consistency of toothpaste. A thin coat will dry within 20 to 30 minutes and is easily sanded wet or dry. One of the reasons I favor this putty is that it does not chip or show an edge between it and the part it is being applied to. It "feathers" wonderfully leaving a smooth transition between putty and part. I've used different kinds of paint over the putty, acrylic, enamel, and lacquer, and it has not produced any kind of negative reaction with any type of paint or brand. Of course, it is always advisable to prime the area to be painted, if for no other reason than to provide a monochromatic surface upon which to add paint.

 

I've used Fingernail Polish Remover to thin this putty, and recently saw a demo in which liquid cement was used. I tried the liquid cement/putty mix recently and it worked very well.

 

One simply dedicates a bottle of the liquid cement "to the cause" because it will get cloudy during this process. Using the applicator brush that comes with the liquid cement, I begin the process by opening the tube of putty. Remove most of the liquid glue from the applicator brush by stroking it on the lip of the cement bottle, and then dab the brush (still wet with some glue) into the open putty tube. Some of the putty will adhere to brush. Apply this mix to the seam, adding liquid cement to thin the mix, or adding a bit of putty to thicken it. Brush the mix around on the seam achieving a smooth and even distribution of material, and at a consistency that you find works for you.

 

While I clean the applicator brush by rubbing it with a paper towel I don't worry about the small amount of putty that ends up inside the liquid glue bottle. That bottle won't be used for anything else and I am not sure that the small amount of putty that gets into the glue has any kind of negative impact, at least I'm not seeing anything amiss after several weeks of observation.

 

Next up....the same technique using the Mr. Surfacer putty..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Testors Liquid Cement can be used to thin Squadron Green Stuff, White Stuff, and Dr. Micro-tools red putty (which are all basically auto-body putties in other tubes and varying grains of fineness). I actually make a bottle of "thinned" putty by using an extra paint jar, filled half/half with putty and cement, or thinned until it's got the consistency of paste (thinner than toothpaste though). I apply it with a toothpick or thin brush (which must IMMEDIATELY be cleaned with lacquer thinner). The advantage is that it's easier to apply in small doses, dries faster, and the glue actually gives the putty more "bite". The one caution here is that you do NOT want to apply it in thick layers; use the sutff straight from the tube for that! The glue-thinned putty IS more aggressive on plastic, and may tend to deform thin areas (like vac plastic) if used to excess. Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably should have specified which liquid glue I used. It is the Testors stuff in a rectagular glass bottle. I use this same glue to apply coats of glue over stretched sprue that I use to close seams. Always....less is better when experimenting with this process but I think you'll find to be a very useful technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...