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Natural Metal Lip on Jetliner Engine Nacelles


tpartlow
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Can anyone tell me how to get a uniform natural metal lip on jetliner engine nacelles?

 

I have tried the dip method but that never comes out right.

 

Any help is very appreciated.

 

Tony Partlow

IPMS #5477

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As tedious as it is, you need to airbrush the lips. I suggest Alclad II Chrome. It MUST be sprayed over gloss black/dark blue enamel. It's maskable, so you can paint it first or last depending on the color of the engine pods.

 

If your pods are black or a very dark blue, you can paint the pods as normal and then mask off the lips and apply the Chrome last.

 

If the pods are white or another light color, then you can paint the gloss black (let dry thoroughly), paint the Chrome, and then mask off the lips. After that, spray a coat of silver or aluminum on the pods to get rid of any black/chrome overspray; and then paint the pod color.

 

I've found that Tamiya tape cut into VERY thin strips works very well. The Chrome is pretty tough, but low tack tapes are the way to go. Hope this helps!

 

100_1064.jpg

Here's an example of how nice and bright the Alclad II Chrome is. It was painted directy over the gloss blue pods. Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

Edited by ghodges
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I've used the same process and it works quite well. The key is the black undercoat or the chrome won't pop out. Yes masking it is a hassle but well worth the effort.

 

Chris

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Here's an alternative suggestion: Use Bare Metal Chrome Foil. This is as simple as cutting a strip of foil and winding it around the engine pod. Go all the way around with a single strip or in shorter pieces if necessary. Burnish the foil forward over the leading edge and into the intake, just as long as it is smooth and without wrinkles. I use a smooth wooden toothpick as my burnishing tool of preference. Many airliner kits have a cheat line either raised or recessed to indicate how far back the lip goes. Use the cheat line to help you cut off the excess with a new single-edge razor blade or #11 x-acto blade. Just use light pressure to slice the foil and roll the edge of the blade around the pod, which should result in a straight edge. Peel off the unwanted excess. By carefully using the tip of the #11 blade, you can then trim the foil a short distance back into the intake.

 

A second method is to cut out a donut ring of foil (use a circle template), with the inside hole smaller than the pod opening and the outside edge sufficient to take you past the cheat line on the outside of the pod. Center the donut over the front of the pod and gently press the donut onto the leading edge with your fingertip. The foil will stretch a bit if you are careful, and you will get a smooth application of foil on the inner and outer surfaces of the pod. Burnish with care until all the foil is stuck down, and then trim with the blades as above.

 

I've used both methods successfully, and the results are the same as Gil's mask-and-paint procedure. So, use whatever works for you. Good luck.

 

Ed

Edited by ewahl
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I do like foil, and it would work as Ed has suggested. The problems I have are:

 

1) I have a DEVIL of a time getting the foil off of the backing sheet. Any tips on a sure fire method other than the tedious and careful application of the tip of a new #11 blade?

 

2) I also have a DEVIL of a time getting the foil peeled off of the sheet in pieces/lengths long enough/big enough to use without it tearing. Any hints on how to prevent that?

 

Thanks!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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GAWD, I love Ed Force One!!!! Was that Minicraft kit as bad as I read it is, or is it floggable? Your wings look pretty even Gil...how'd you do it? I still have that decal sheet from a few years ago, when we all ordered them. Just wanna be sure when I use them, it's the right kit. There won't be any more....

 

 

 

 

As tedious as it is, you need to airbrush the lips. I suggest Alclad II Chrome. It MUST be sprayed over gloss black/dark blue enamel. It's maskable, so you can paint it first or last depending on the color of the engine pods.

 

If your pods are black or a very dark blue, you can paint the pods as normal and then mask off the lips and apply the Chrome last.

 

If the pods are white or another light color, then you can paint the gloss black (let dry thoroughly), paint the Chrome, and then mask off the lips. After that, spray a coat of silver or aluminum on the pods to get rid of any black/chrome overspray; and then paint the pod color.

 

I've found that Tamiya tape cut into VERY thin strips works very well. The Chrome is pretty tough, but low tack tapes are the way to go. Hope this helps!

 

100_1064.jpg

Here's an example of how nice and bright the Alclad II Chrome is. It was painted directy over the gloss blue pods. Cheers!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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I really don't recall any significant problems, so it must have been reasonably floggable... :smiley4: ; but then again your talkin' to a guy who regularly whips on vacs and resin kits, so my perspective might be a bit warped! :smiley29:

 

My overall memory is that it was a fun build and the decals went down great!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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