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Willys jeep engine color

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what color was the willys jeep engine and undercarriage frame? all i can find is restored pics of them, and they show it OD. Was this how they were painted?

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what color was the willys jeep engine and undercarriage frame? all i can find is restored pics of them, and they show it OD. Was this how they were painted?

 

After lots of searching, I could find NO color WWII photos of a Jeep engine. Lots of color photos that show the block to be OD, but those appear to all be restorations, just like you found.

 

I found ONE photo that shows the basic engine as a medium grey (http://www.1943mb.com/c-73-G503_WWII_Jeep_...vil_Engine.aspx) but again, this looks like a restored Jeep.

 

If no experts post their opinions, I would be inclined to go with an OD engine and several gloss or semi-gloss black bits, like air cleaner, horn, etc.

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I know this is later but from 1982-2002, most engine parts block, tranny, transfer gearcase on the M113 series were Green/OD from the factory and overhauls/refurbished were Gray.

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Willys was the main builder of these jeeps thru most of WWII. Ford started to make them around 1944. Here is a link of a photo that shoud help you out. For the most part the engines were O.D. green.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tysonneil/485843577/

 

Hope this helps,

 

Chris

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When I opened Chris' link, I found a photo of a post-war Jeep with a red engine. I'm not sure if that is what Chris wanted us to see, as it more-or-less doesn't pertain to the thread.

 

I was also pondering whether the engine color could be manufacturer specific, like OD for Willys, grey for Ford or vice-versa. Sure seems like someone out there ought to know the answer.

 

Were I building a Jeep where I was going to display it with the hood up, I might just paint the engine grey just to add some color. Maybe that's why WWII German stuff intrigues me so much--there's such a variety of colors and shades of colors involved. IMHO, U.S. WWII stuff is pretty bland in comparison.

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Rick,

We had bland vehicles because we kicked derriere!!!! We didn'thave to worry so much about camo because we controlled the skies and the ground! We didn't need to hide or concealour vehicles becasue we ROCKED!!!

 

Mark

 

 

 

 

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Rick,

We had bland vehicles because we kicked derriere!!!! We didn'thave to worry so much about camo because we controlled the skies and the ground! We didn't need to hide or concealour vehicles becasue we ROCKED!!!

 

Mark

 

Mark,

 

HA, ha, ha! Hey, I know & totally agree! My Dad was one of those butt-kickers, in the 75th division, from the Battle of the Bulge to the war's end in Europe. He managed to make it through without any physical damage, but the mental damage was another story. My mother said many times that he came back a totally different person than he was before combat.

 

I also believe that having only one color for EVERYTHING sure made ordering easy ("Just give me one in OD, bub.") However, it makes modeling a bit of a challenge, as I find myself constantly trying to mix yet another shade of OD that MIGHT have been found in real life. Uniforms are a bit more challenging and fun, as we started the war with primarily beige/brown combat uniforms and web gear and ended the war in dark OD.

 

BTW- Although the Sherman was a pretty mediocre tank when compared to Panthers & Tigers, and tended to catch fire when hit with anything bigger than a pea-shooter (hence the nickname "Ronson" [a cigarette lighter for those who aren't old enough to know]), it was good that we had thousands of them we could throw at the Germans. Eventually they ran out of ammo or made the mistake of letting a Sherman get behind them, and then it was payback time.

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Ok sorry about the last link for the post war engine. He is one taken at the US 1st Inf. Musuem. This should clear up any color question.

 

willysJeep43cantigny10.jpg

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Ohhhh great, Chris. Now ya done it. A third color, Dark Green! Not OD. Or is it a freshly applied OD? Or does it look like fresh OD because the rest of the exterior of the vehicle seen in the photo has been exposed to the elements and has faded, giving the appearance that they are different shades? .......Just pullin yer chain. It is an excellent photo. But seriously, I can't get past that it is by all measures a "modern" restoration and I must admit that I still question the accuracy of it representing a period correct example. Not tryin to bash your effects, they are appreciated.

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British Racing Green? Maybe that Jeep's engine was rebuilt by the brits and stored away for 50-60 years?

 

As Ken mentioned, yet another engine color in a restored Jeep doesn't help us figure out the color they left the factory in during the war.

 

That's a really nice restoration though. They even painted the exhaust manifold with high-heat black, which is a bit over-the-top IMHO!!!

 

I think I would stick with OD as the basic engine color.

Edited by RickC5

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Found a REALLY GOOD LINK!!! Explains the diffferences between ford and MB.

 

 

http://www.jeepdraw.com/

Edited by Mark Aldrich

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Found a REALLY GOOD LINK!!! Explains the diffferences between ford and MB.

 

http://www.jeepdraw.com/

 

And here's the specific piece we were looking for (about 1/3 way down):

 

http://jeepdraw.com/PART_COLOURS.htm

 

So if you're building a Ford, paint the engine GREY. If a Willys, paint it OD.

 

Wow! You can find out what color EVERY part left the factory originally painted.

 

GREAT JOB finding that site Mark! It will be a great reference to Jeep modelers (& restorers too).

Edited by RickC5

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Mark,

 

That is really a great site. I will add that to my favorites list. Well there you have it, you should be all set.

 

Chris

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what color was the willys jeep engine and undercarriage frame? all i can find is restored pics of them, and they show it OD. Was this how they were painted?

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Pappy,

Color is relative. There are pictures of vehicles coming off an assembly line in distinctly different shades. Add to that how the crews touched up and repaired vehicles affects color also. I don't use acrylics but the Model Master line matches their oils pretty well. I use their OD often as well as Humbrol. The Humbrol has a distinct green to it though.

 

Mark

Edited by Mark Aldrich

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When I was in the Army in the 60's my jeep was OD on the engine compartment and bottom of the jeep. It had probably been repainted a couple of times. The outside of the body and crew compartment were black/green, way darker than OD.

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Les,

YOU are such a LIAR!!! Back when you were in the Army....they were still using horses!!!!!

 

HAHA!!!

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