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Creating an Inventory Database


Roktman
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Hey all,

 

I've finally come to the conclusion that there's no way I can build all the kits in my stash. I had been toying with the idea of creating a database so if and when the time comes, my wife and son will know what I have, and approximately what they can get for my left over stash.

Besides mfg, model name, scale, what its worth or what I paid - can anyone think of something that might be important?  TIA.

 

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Since most of my stash is in banker's boxes, I number the boxes and have a location field in my spread sheet to indicate which box a kit is stored. I also have columns for Classification (aircraft, armor, sci-fi, etc) and "Manufactured by/Series" (Douglas, North American, Grumman, Star Trek, Star Wars, etc). By filtering the data, this helps me quickly see if I already have a particular subject in my stash. I also list condition of the kit, i.e. bag kit or whether it is started, and in the notes I will list any aftermarket I may have for it. 

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8 hours ago, AZRhino said:

I also list condition of the kit, i.e. bag kit or whether it is started, and in the notes I will list any aftermarket I may have for it. 

Ooh, those are good ideas - I need to add those to my database spreadsheet. I'm always buying duplicate aftermarket bits! 

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I use Excel. I created a workbook with a separate worksheet for each major category (1/72 aircraft, 1/700 ships, etc.) with columns for the important data (kit manufacturer, catalog number, subject, number in inventory, aftermarket parts, aftermarket decals, storage box number, etc.).

Edited by SkyKing
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Go to Scalemates. You can easily create an account and stash database there. The best thing is that if their database does not include an item, any member can add an item.

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  • 2 months later...

I use Excel, mainly because I'm very familiar with it, and designed my spreadsheet to meet my needs. I list kit manufacturer, kit ID number from the box, and occasionally the box color. (These help me identify older, more collectable kits.) Most of my stash are aircraft kits, so I show aircraft type (ie, F-4E) and popular name (Phantom). I can sort on any column to instantly see how many F-4Es I already have so I don't buy any more.... it also helps me in the vendor room, as I can tell right away if I 'need" to buy a kit that I don't have. A kit ID number that starts with "V72" is a 1/72 vacuform, and an "R48" is a 1/48 resin.

I have kits that contain models that are partially built (I bought some small collections over the years from friends who abandoned model making), so I identify which have been started. Or are missing parts or decals. And I have a column that shows how many duplicate kits I have. Some are intentional, since I was going to build a couple of collections (no progress on those yet) and some are just because I REALLY like that aircraft type (F-15s and A-4s for example).

And, because I have more kits than I'll ever build, I color code those kits I'm willing to sell - and the price I'll ask for if/when I decide/get off my butt to sell them.

At the moment, there are 455 entries, with 150 that I'm willing to sell. Don't be shocked if you see me as a vendor at a future National!

My list won't work for everyone. It doesn't have to. It was designed by me, for me.

Mike

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