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1:32 F-16, suggestions requested


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Here are two photos of the engine build.  Please notice the longitudinal gap in both.  I worked a long time in making sure mating surfaces were smooth and even but as you can see not enough i guess.

I am looking for suggestions for fixing this issue because i want to display the engine on the included dolly.  I am also going to buy a USAF tow vehicle i found at an online hobby store.  

Thoughts please.

Stuart

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The outside needs filler of some kind. I have always ound the inside to be more challenging. Couple options- cover the intake and exhaust ends with covers. Second, a filler like Perfect Plastic Putty is also good. Add and wipe with water for a smooth seam. Might take a couple applications. Also, anything metallic will show EVERYTHING- every little scratch, nub, etc.

 

Dave

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I apologize for not completely following your first suggestion.  When you say cover with covers do you mean some sort of thin strip of plastic to “hide” the gaps?  I’m still new to this.

I do have a Tamiya modeling putty but I was not sure if it was appropriate for a small gap.

Thanks so much for responding so quickly, very much appreciated.

Stuart

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I believe he means covering the openings of the engine on both ends with some kind of FOD covers. That will hide the inside seams. The outside seams can be filled with something like Perfect Plastic Putty or Vallejo acrylic putty and wiped smooth with a wet finger or Q-tip, or any other type of tool. A couple applications may be needed to account for putty shrinkage during drying, but eventually you should have a smooth and seamless surface. As he said above: metallic paints show every single flaw so you need to be diligent with the application.

 

I hope this helps clear things up.

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Thanks so much for the clarification, I’ll get to work.  Not going to lie though, had to look up FOD.😀

Stuart

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One thing I have found is that it is easier to subtract than to add.  What I mean is when you test fit the pieces and you see that parts are going to have gaps.  "Prefill" them.  My technique is to use a solvent based putty such as basic Tamiya White and put it along the edge to be joined.  Then assemble the piece so the excess putty squeeze's out.  Join the unfilled section of the seam with your usual extra thin cement and hold it together as you normally would.  Let is dry completely.  Do not try to clean it off while it is wet.  It will just smear.  Once it is dry most of what squeezed out will just snap off easily.  Then a light touch with a sanding stick and you should have a perfect seam. 

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You've got your hands full with filling those gaps in but it's still doable if you take your time. I usually use super glue for filler but only let it cure out for one day before attempting to sand or sculpt it with sanding sticks, files or the x-acto. Looking forward to this build.

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20 hours ago, PeteJ said:

One thing I have found is that it is easier to subtract than to add.  What I mean is when you test fit the pieces and you see that parts are going to have gaps.  "Prefill" them.  My technique is to use a solvent based putty such as basic Tamiya White and put it along the edge to be joined.  Then assemble the piece so the excess putty squeeze's out.  Join the unfilled section of the seam with your usual extra thin cement and hold it together as you normally would.  Let is dry completely.  Do not try to clean it off while it is wet.  It will just smear.  Once it is dry most of what squeezed out will just snap off easily.  Then a light touch with a sanding stick and you should have a perfect seam. 

Brilliant idea Pete! I never considered doing that. I'm filing that away to try some other time when I face this issue again.

 

Stuart, sorry about not being clearer about FOD. Glad you got it sorted.

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Ordered some stuff recommended here and I’ll start working when I get it Saturday.  The ribbed areas have me worried most, not sure i could ever replicate that profile. I’ll see it to the end but if it doesn’t go well I can always display it with the engine installed (cowardly but practical 😀) and still build a tow vehicle with an empty dolly.

Thanks so much to everyone for the advice and recommendations. I appreciate the patience with my questions.

Stuart

 

 

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So I used Vallejo Acrylic Putty to (try and) fill the gaps.  I went through 3 cycles of apply, wait 20 minutes, trim, wait 24 hours, sand.  I think I made a mess of it.  There are two photos attached that are from the same view as the first two I posted.  There are some areas that look pretty good and more that don't.  I think I failed the go real slow advice.  Also, on the first pass I put way too much on it.  Getting the excess off made a mess right from the start and I had to sand too far beyond the gap.  The last two passes I did a much better job of application.  Saving grace, a good length of the gaps will be hidden by other pieces.  Please provide any thoughts you might have.

I do have a few questions:

1.  Should I have put the five major pieces of the engine body together before painting?  I know hindsight is 20/20 but that would have saved some of the problems.

2.  I definitely want to put an FOD cover on the exhaust end.  I've tried to use google images to see what this might look like.  Perhaps someone has a photo of a real F-16 engine with the cover.  Do you all think this is something I will have to fabricate myself?  I have tried to look online at hobby stores, etc. and have found nothing.

Thanks so much!

Stuart

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  • 1 month later...

Looks like they pull a cover over it. Here are 2 pics I found for you. In terms of paint I try to assemble as much as possible before priming and painting. Anything that will be affected by glue I assemble 1st. I did this for my F-16 in Thunderbirds motif. I put the engine halves together 1st then did all the filling, then add components and paint.

chris

 

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