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Ryefield Models 1/35th scale Workable Track Links


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         Hope that everyone is doing well. I wanted to pass this along to the group. I've not dealt with individual track links before. This kit was recommended to me by one of the staff members at my hobby store. They are the most realistic I've seen. Once the construction is completed, you have a very articulate, and realistic set of tracks. One thing that I look for is natural sag between the return rollers.  These tracks have no issues delivering in that area. The kit comes with 4 jigs to make sure everything lines up as it should. The instructions state that no glue is needed. I chose to use Loc Tite superglue to glue the rear track pads down, and to attach the track center guides.  I separated, and cleaned up, each of the the parts, prior to putting them in their labeled paint lids. The only parts that I left on their sprues, were the drift pin assemblies. 

Step 1. Put left and right track pads in jig. Step 2. Insert drift pin assembly. Step 3. Apply a small amount of superglue to each of the holes. 4. Insert rear track pad in the jig. 5. Apply a small amount of superglue to the bottom of each center guide, and insert it into the center holes. 6. Remove track assembly from jig, and cut off remaining sprue. 7. Join completed track sections together. 

      This did take some time. After building 2-3 sections to get the hang of it, I started an assembly line using all 4 jigs. This expedited the process exponentially.I  look forward to building these again for another kit. My hats off the Ryefield. Great product!!!

Chris

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US tracks should have minimal sag. They have live track with rubber bushings that push back against sag. Plus crews are supposed to maintain proper track tension on top of that. Those are beautifully detailed tracks though. 

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             Thanks for the reply Carlos. I’m really glad I bought them. I can’t wait to get the tank built to put them on . I think I paid about $21 for the kit. Well worth the price I think. 
             Tension is maintained on the track by a cylinder attached to the idler wheel assembly. This cylinder, that looks more  like a shock absorber, and has a grease gun fitting on it. To maintain proper tension, you attach your grease gun to this fitting, and start pumping. As you pump, you can see the track become taught. You don’t want the track really tight. All this will do is reduce the service life of the track.
               Each track section does have rubber bushings that surround the track pin. Over time, these bushings wear out. When this happens, you need to apply tension more often. If left unchecked, you can actually bend the track pin inside the bushing housings. Eventually the track, or track sections have to be replaced because of too much slack.
                 If enough slack is present, you take a chance on “ throwing track“. (Track comes off partially or completely). This has a higher chance of occurring when a sharp turn is made, on uneven terrain. If that happens, you and your crew have to “break track” (Take the track apart) and reassemble it. If you lucky, your on somewhat level ground, and it’s dry. Most of the time, this is not the case. There’s nothing worse than throwing track in the pouring down rain, in the middle of a muddy field. Not so much fun. (But a good workout).

                   To make matters worse, your now a sitting duck, unable to move, until the track has been broken, and reassembled. Thanks again for the reply. Can’t wait to see your tank finished!

Chris

 

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A very well worded explanation on track tension, track pin bushings, and why it is maintained as such Chris. Sounds like we’ve had similar experiences with tracks... 😉 It’s fun to drive or ride in the things, but keeping them in working condition sucks. Lol! That’s one reason I don’t like indie track links too much... reminds me of working on the real damned things... lol!

 

Im looking forward to this Sherman of yours. Thanks for looking in on my Patton. 

 

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👍😂. It’s all fun and games until you throw track in the worst possible area . I threw track in Hohenfels Germany during an ARTEP. A very well traveled trail that several armored vehicles were using. It had been raining for a couple of days. 
          Thanks for the reply Carlos. What was your MOS? I was a 19D. (Cavalry Scout)

Chris

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When I was Regular Army Mech, I was 11HE9, ITVs. During that time I was twice assigned as the platoon leaders driver/RTO. Which meant I got to take care of the platoon command track all by myself, and when we did dismount ops, I had to hump the radio in addition to my own gear. Always fun during July at Ft Polk. I got to work with our Battalion Scout platoon on a few occasions. Real good guys led by an old school Sgt when I first was assigned. He was prior RLI in Rhodesia before that fell apart and he came to the US and enlisted. Later on I was 11B before moving on to other MOSs in the Guard.

Ive been to Hohenfels several times. All were during cold wet months... I’ve walked all over that place and rode much of it too. I can picture those tank trails and still feel that mud sucking at my boots...

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           Thanks for your service Carlos. Sounds like you  had a very interesting military career. The first tracked vehicle I drove was a M113 at Ft. Knox. Scared the living crap out of my instructor. Good times indeed. 
             I look forward to seeing your work.

Chris

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Thank you Chris. I did indeed have some interesting times in my service career. As I’m sure that you did as well. I may have done some things differently if given the chance to do them again, but I would not trade the experience of doing them for anything. I’m kinda funny about “thank you for your service” coming from a fellow army vet. It feels more like thanks for choosing to come along and be one of us. 

I remember taking turns learning to drive a 113 at Ft. Benning... 

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