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Dyno Don Maverick-1 Year Project-Finished!!


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First....let me go into the actual car. I've been wanting to build a Maverick for a VERY long time but there aren't many kits to choose from. The best offering (and this isn't saying much) is the Jo-Han kit. I was fortunate to get mine from someone on another forum for the mere price of $50. These kits are running around 300+ bucks nowadays so 50 bones is a friggin' steal. Then there came the matter of subject. I was looking for a car to build....you know....a pattern. Nothing struck my fancy for the longest time until I found Dyno Don's car. Man....I was smitten!  Just an evil lookin' car! So .....I set out to build it.

The real deal:


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When I started this project one year ago almost to the day I just didn't realize what ride I was in for. This started life as a Jo-Han kit and I quickly found out that it would become much more on down the line. The only things used out of this kit were the body, base interior tub (which got modified at that) and the engine. The rest....went in the trash. The chassis is from AMT's 67 Mustang Fastback, interior is almost all aftermarket stuff to include the 27 piece shifter and the 25 piece seat belt harness. In fact so much scratch and up level detailing was done in the interior that I don't even know where to start. Total parts count for the interior alone is 125 pieces in all. Extensive mods were done to the chassis to get everything to "work" and although not accurate it allowed me to achieve the stance and overall look that I was after. Probably the BIGGEST hang up I had with this car was trying to figure out how to fabricate the shock tower/ inner fenderwells for it because I just couldn't get anything to work. After MANY hours in thought and experimentation I ended up fabbing them up from soda can aluminum.


Paint....I used Tamiya's Pure Red with a Testors Wet Look clear. Car decals were from a supplier on Ebay....forgot the vendor.  Wheels and tires are from the parts bin except for the rear wheels which I used from Revells 41 Willy's gasser kit. All lettering on the sidewalls of the tires are from Slixx decals. The engine has details from so many different suppliers that I forgot half of where I got everything from. LOTS of scratch work though. Cooling fans are from the Revell Rick Dobbertin Pontiac J2000 kit and again....were heavily modified to fit into this car. This was definitely a test of my abilities as a modeler to say the least but I learned ALOT from this build (as well as learned a few new curse words). There are inaccuracies that'll be noticed by anyone who knows anything about this car and a few liberties taken here and there in the name of adding interest to the car but I feel like it came out alright. I also left off the wheelie bars. I was going to scratchbuild a set but the longer I looked at it the more I thought that they would detract from the overall looks of the car. Any how.....I present here...the finished product.



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and like all my latest builds she finds herself in my garage for a while now....

 

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Another killer build there Joe! And, as always, your presentation is first class! 

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  • 3 weeks later...
6 hours ago, MWS said:

Sweeeeet.  Awesome Maverick.

Thanks Mark. This build literally tested just about every skill I had as a modeler. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/21/2020 at 7:49 AM, dmorrissette said:

Most impressive. I still remember pumping gas into Mavericks as a kid. 

Great project and superb execution

Dave

Heck ! My parents owned a tame 6 cylinder 4 door version.

Kinda ho-hum to drive- not unexpected.

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Thanks Bob! I just applied the decals onto the shiny surface of the tire sidewall, then shot a super light coat (you've GOT to make sure it's VERY thin) of MM acrylic flat clear coat cut with ISO alcohol over the sidewalls to dull the sidewalls out some and blend the decal into the tire causing the clear film of the decal to disappear. After that I dry brushed some ground up black pastel onto the sidewalls of the tire and decals to further flatten everything out as well as add that dingy black coat over the lettering.

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6 hours ago, mustang1989 said:

Thanks Bob! I just applied the decals onto the shiny surface of the tire sidewall, then shot a super light coat (you've GOT to make sure it's VERY thin) of MM acrylic flat clear coat cut with ISO alcohol over the sidewalls to dull the sidewalls out some and blend the decal into the tire causing the clear film of the decal to disappear. After that I dry brushed some ground up black pastel onto the sidewalls of the tire and decals to further flatten everything out as well as add that dingy black coat over the lettering.

Thanks for that tip. I was wondering how I would make the decals blend in- I was aware of a similar process for aircraft but hadn't considered using black pastel - that must make the tire surface look a lot more like real rubber when looking at it up close.

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The pastel does the trick on two levels. 1.) It gives it just a tad bit more realistic black shade and 2.) gives the tire a true rubber look. 

The MM Flat Clear cut with ISO gives it a really flat appearance but you really have to watch not getting it on there thick. Just enough to where you can see the clear go on and dry almost immediately. I use a reflection off of a light source to literally watch it go on the tire.

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7 hours ago, mustang1989 said:

The pastel does the trick on two levels. 1.) It gives it just a tad bit more realistic black shade and 2.) gives the tire a true rubber look. 

The MM Flat Clear cut with ISO gives it a really flat appearance but you really have to watch not getting it on there thick. Just enough to where you can see the clear go on and dry almost immediately. I use a reflection off of a light source to literally watch it go on the tire.

reminds me of a tip i read somewhere for painting  miniature figures

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LOL!! I think I read that a few years back as well. Hey....if it works ....it works. spacer.png

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