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nursemandie

Resin Figures

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I have a question for you guys, I asked a couple people at Nats but I wanted to take it to masses. What do you use as filler on resin for like seams and bubble holes.

I've started trying to build nose art figures and needed some help.

 

Mandie

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I have a question for you guys, I asked a couple people at Nats but I wanted to take it to masses. What do you use as filler on resin for like seams and bubble holes.

I've started trying to build nose art figures and needed some help.

Mandie

 

Three things:

 

Mr. Surfacer

Milliput or Apoxie Sculpt

super glue

 

I like the epoxy putty, since I can force it into the gap or hole then smooth it out with a wet finger. Unless you're quick to sand, super glue may cause more problems than it fixes. Mr Surfacer can be dabbed on, allowed to dry, and smoothed with denatured alcohol or (on resin or metal only) lacquer thinner.

 

Since I hosted the figure painting seminar in '05, here are a few things I presented then that you might want to file away:

 

1. I always use 5-minute epoxy to assemble white metal parts to resin parts. I tend to use epoxy for all joints, but resin-to-resin can usually be glued with super glue.

2. When in doubt, pin it. Drill holes and insert brass wire pins, then glue with epoxy or super glue.

3. Repeat after me: Floquil Reefer White. Airbrushed, if possible. It is the best primer I've used to figures.

4. Buy the best brushes you can--they'll cost you a wee bit o' cash, but they'll last a lifetime. Windsor and Newton Series 7/Series 12 are the Gold Standard.

5. I don't know which paints you're wanting to use, but my vote is for artists' oils. Use odorless thinner or English Distilled Turpentine.

 

PM me or e-mail me off board and I'll dig up my color recipes for skin tones and the like. E-mail is same as it has ever been: r.nardone@mindspring.com

 

Cheers, and say hey to Steve.

 

R

 

PS: jodie says hey....

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My wife just had that conversation at our club meeting with Rich from R&J Enterprises. He casts resin armor aftermarket parts. He said he uses CA and baking soda to fill small holes. It cures right away and can be sanded immediately.

 

 

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Hi:

 

Aves Apoxie scupt. Water thinable and smoothable (minimal to no sanding and cures quick enough for me). No need for any major sanding. Mix, push on, use water the smooth and fill- let dry and a touch of sandpaper and perfect seam. Also can be sculpted to replicate hair, mising parts, etc unlike some other fillers

 

I like Mr. Surfacer also for the pinholes

 

David Fishers Modelmania videos (Volumes 1 and 2 maybe) show use of the stuff where he resculpts a major portion of a figure using this and some other tyhings

 

Dave

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Biggs epoxy putty for large gaps and baking soda/CA for air bubbles. A couple of additions/exceptions to Ralph's list: I think that Tamiya's Fine Gray Primer in the rattle can is one of the best figure primers available. Also, while I do have and use WN Series 7 brushes, I am partial to the Loew-Cornell Americans Painters series of brushes available at Micheal's. They are inexpensive and work very well, without much of the "hooking" problem found in many synthetics.

 

Jim

 

 

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Biggs epoxy putty for large gaps and baking soda/CA for air bubbles. A couple of additions/exceptions to Ralph's list: I think that Tamiya's Fine Gray Primer in the rattle can is one of the best figure primers available. Also, while I do have and use WN Series 7 brushes, I am partial to the Loew-Cornell Americans Painters series of brushes available at Micheal's. They are inexpensive and work very well, without much of the "hooking" problem found in many synthetics.

 

Jim

 

I agree with you on the Loew/Cornell brushes--I have found that their 10/0 equates in size to a W-N 3/0, so choose accordingly. At the shop I work at, we carry a line of Imex brushes that look like they would work equally as well, although without using them I can't testify how long they'll last.

 

Since I don't underpaint with acrylics, I like the white primer vs. the gray primer since it also serves as a base to my skin tone recipe (actually, it is Phil Kessling's skin tone recipe handed down to me by Master Figure Modeler Keith Kowalski). The white base makes the skin tone easier to paint, and it also helps keep bright coors just that--bright and vivid. Given the transparency of oils, gray tends to muddy colors a bit--great for military uniforms, but not-so-great for colorful tunics and such.

 

As always, use what works for you--other than color, either Tamiya primer should work--although I did have some issues with the rattle can Tamiya White, it didn't provide enough tooth for the oils and they tended to smear rather than blend. That's why I keep going back to Reefer White. I've airbrushed it most of the time, but Keith applies it with a brush and gets great results--of course, he'll tell you that he paints everything with a brush.... ;)

 

Ralph

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Thanks for the help guys. I did buy some L-C brushes today. I hope sometime next week to actually get a chance to work on something.

 

 

Mandie

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Guest Bun E. Carlos

He casts resin armor aftermarket parts. He said he uses CA and baking soda to fill small holes. It cures right away and can be sanded immediately.

 

I've used that, but it tends to be messy :) I like that system on really big gaps.

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Has anyone used drywall patch and sealed it with super glue? It's quick easy to clean with damp cloth and sets up in no time. Also easy to get and cheep.

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