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Collin

In-Flight Model Category Question

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Tried searching the forums about this but my efforts were poor. 

 

Why “gear up” when it comes to this category?  Interested in the logic/reason. 

 

Normally you are airborne when weight off wheels. Gear could be down or in transit soon after rotation or on final/in the pattern. 

 

I called “airborne” to CATCC each Case III launch. I guarantee I was airborne, but I was still waiting for three up indicators and the red light to go out in the gear handle.

 

More curious than anything, appreciate any insight.  

 

Cheers

Collin 

 

Edited by Collin
Clean up

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Collin. Your question would be best directed to the IPMS/USA Chief Judge, Mark Persichetti at NCC@ipmsusa.org . That way you will get the official answer instead of just opinions on this board. 

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Then maybe he can post the response here too since I don't believe Mark will. I'm curious to know this myself in case someone asks me this same question.

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This is a relatively new category. I do not know what it’s origins are, although I think it is possible that the NCC was looking to create a category to display models on stands as we did as kids. Also, it is somewhat ironic that, in our contests, probably c.90% of models of things whose natural element is the air are depicted sitting on the ground or on water! (But, these are just speculations.) I thought it was a good idea and it was instantly popular.

Now, the NCC  devised,  then, the rules to define what can be legally entered in the category.  This is always done with the goal of creating consistency amongst the entries or, if you will,  a level playing field. Partially retracted gear displays a level of detail that other entries may not incorporate. This may be perceived as giving the entry with visible landing gear an advantage. It is reasonable, therefore, to not permit it. 

The rules can be debated endlessly and are, at times, modified to reflect the changing wants and needs of our members. But, when preparing a model for a particular category, we are all obligated, in fairness,  to follow the rules, even if we cannot all agree with all of them.

Or to put it more bluntly- you have your idea of what the meaning of “in flight” is and the NCC has theirs. For the purposes of entering IPMS contests, you would be well advised to take your marching orders from the NCC. I do!

Nick Filippone, Senior National Judge 

 

 

 

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If I recall correctly, the "Gear Up" category premiered during the 2013 Loveland, CO Nats.  It was created to "level the playing field" when comparing planes with gear up (GU) versus gear down (GD).  This worked in two ways from a judging perspective.  The GU planes had fewer details to judge when compared to a fully plumbed GD build.  However, the GD planes were more susceptible to alignment problems that the GU planes did not encounter.

So, by splitting them creates a better “apples-to-apples” comparison.  This category has been very popular since inception.

HTH – PatV.

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I had not ( but I should have) thought of that.  It makes perfect sense.  Thank you for that explanation. It again points out the ongoing endeavour of the NCC to keep things as fair as possible. 

Nick

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