Jump to content

Recommended Posts

If anyone believes the British are not very competitive by nature, a review of Tudor history alone should disabuse them of that misconception!

Whose Empire was it that the sun never set on? 

Regards, An incurable Anglophile💂‍♂️

Edited by Nick Filippone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back on topic, I have been doing a little local research and found those who grinch the most about IPMS being too picky, etc, also don't make much effort to fill out the comments/note section on an entry form. One guy said he didn't understand what the box was for? When people do weird things, they need to note and explain them.

We talk about only judging craftsmanship and not accuracy, but these things often over lap. We don't like seams and globs of glue because the are not accurate. I recently had some AMPS guys say the weathering was overdone on a model, yet all the weathering was based on specific photos which I should have included with the entry sheet. Or is heavy weathering poor craftsmanship?

Dak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, for the reasons you describe, too much or too little weathering shouldn't be a consideration when judging.  The realism of the technique is what should be considered.   If the modeler chooses a factory finish or rust dripping to the ground, what matters is how well (or not) it was done and how realistic (or not) the weathering looks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Rusty White said:

too much or too little weathering shouldn't be a consideration when judging.  The realism of the technique is what should be considered.   If the modeler chooses a factory finish or rust dripping to the ground, what matters is how well (or not) it was done and how realistic (or not) the weathering looks.

How realistic a technique is done is a question of accuracy. Which is what I am saying, the two often go hand in hand. We may not judge how many rivets are accurate, or the shade of paint, but a big glue glob along the wing root is both poor craftmanship AND (generally) not accurate. However some glue globs in some places might be. Fogging around the edges of some canopies might also be accurate.

My point is the builder needs to let the judges know if this is done deliberately. Encouraging more people to fill out the comments box is something which could pay us back with happier entrants and better informed judges.

Dak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to the PR  problem this thread is about, global IPMS perception. We tend to think that just about everyone into plastic models knows about IPMS, and it is surprising how many do not! Many myths and misconceptions have arisen over the years. One is that many think we are an aircraft only society. Another is that the society is too full of nit picking rivet counting experts and nerds and perhaps feel a bit intimidated about making a membership enquiry at a!l.

Maybe our passions run a bit high about rules  and standards eff that we forget that there are many hobbyists out there who simply want to have a bit of fun out of the hobby whilst learning a bit more. 

Another problem is, how welcoming are we to someone new arriving at our local club nights. Do we make sure that they are welcomed, or remain in conversation with our little clique in the club blissfully  ignoring someone who has just walked in and knows no one?

Edited by noelsmith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Move the emphasis from competition to exhibition.  No contest, no "winner", no "losers", just a room full of models and modelers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me re-make a point here.  Where is it written that a person MUST care if they win or lose at the contest?  I know several people who attend, put the model on the table, and enjoy the rest of the convention without another thought about the contest.  They enjoy looking at a roomful of models without it impacting their self-worth.  Winning an award is gravy. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ralph's comment to a certain extent may be passionate about how he feels. But has competition got to be the be all and end all for IPMS? Telford is an example of how competition and exhibition can go hand in hand without people feeling that they have to compete. Many Modellers are not bothered one jot about competition, yet the models they enjoy just exhibiting would do well in competition! There is room for both within IPMS. We have to ask ourselves if we are a modelling society promoting the hobby or a modelling competition society? Everyone was a novice to start with, and we should be reaching out to those people as well as more established hobbyists.

I fear that IPMS is in danger of taking itself a bit too seriously at times.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is being competitive in model building any different than soccer, golf, tennis or horse racing? The only difference is modeling building tends to be a personally creative and people tend to feel personally hurt or offended when others don't reward their work.

Human beings are by nature competitive. Competition breeds innovation. There is no doubt the desire to win has improved the art of model building and help drive manufactures to make better models. Is all competition good, certainly not. Some take it too seriously and that requires more and new rules every year.

Everything has certain inherent standards which some ignore or refuse to acknowledge. For example, a guy I know steadfastly refuses to address seams. He either leaves them open or filled with globs of glue. Otherwise he does basically good work. Yet, he doesn't understand why IPMS puts so much importance on filling seams. I have explained it to him, but he doesn't think it should matter.

Dak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noel (and all): I totally agree with you, and IPMSUSA has JUST begun to try to step us in the direction of de-emphasizing the contest. They've recently mandated that beginning this year and at all future conventions the host MUST have as many Display Only tables as their venue can provide. Of course that is AFTER they've taken care of the contest area first, so it will vary from show to show. Still, up til now, "display" has been only an occasional afterthought. Now IPMSUSA is going to encourage guys who don't want to compete to bring their stuff to display. Personally, I've reserved 2 display tables for ANYONE that'll be dedicated vacuform and resin models.

There are two major differences here in the USA as compared to the UK and Telford. First and foremost, our Nats is the way it is because it started out with a competition format and has steadily grown from there. It's a VERY successful show, and the old adage "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" applies to a great degree. Would it be as big and successful with less of a contest here in the USA? Perhaps.....but I'm not sure any host wants to take that financial risk since the current format is a "money maker". In other words, we're sort of stuck with what we have because it's what we've always done and it works well!

The second difference, as I mentioned before, is our vast distances to our shows. Anyone in the UK is a day's drive from Telford. Even a lot of Europe can be there in a single day's travel time WITHOUT having to hop on a plane. That makes the transport of models and stuff needed for booths much more practical. I consider the upcoming Chattanooga show to be an easy drive, and it'll be close to 7hrs. I plan to drive to the Texas show in 2020, and that will involve two days of driving and probably no less than 20hrs travel time. The rest of the shows involve airplanes where you're lucky if you can carry more than one model on, not to mention the hassle of TSA security checks! Only in the eastern US, or possibly southern CA, where there's a greater density of clubs per state, could we possibly have what Telford has with club booths...but with no tradition of doing that, the "clubs" never really consider it.

Rick Jackson NAILED IT in his post above. Just bring your models, put them on the contest tables and go enjoy the show for the sake of the show and don't worry about winning or losing!

 

GIL :smiley16:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...