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Gregsed56

3D printer for Modeling

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Nothing like a fascinating conversation where definitions are determined by individual perception.  Noel, creating something from raw materials is modelmaking and it doesn't matter what the raw materials are or how you create the end creation.  In fact, most if not all modelbuilders are also modelmakers.  If that sounds strange, consider this:  When you take a model kit and then superdetail parts of it using raw materials....or as close to raw materials as most of us get...you are both a modelbuilder and modelmaker.  For example, take a model with a basic landing gear and no detail in the gear wells.  Build the kit stock and you are a modelbuilder since you add nothing to the kit parts that were provided by the kit manufacturer.  However, when you add detailing to that landing gear and/or gear wells by using minute pieces of wire, bits of scrap plastic, etc, then you are a modelmaker.

Rusty uses skills developed in the creation of patterns from conventional material.  That definitely makes him a scratchbuilder and modelmaker.  But when he complements those learned skills with additional skills required for the use of new technology, you would say that he is not a modelmaker.  I would suggest that a rethink is required due to the fact resin or whatever material is used by a 3D printer still qualifies as raw material because it has to  be changed to create the desired form.  And it would not know how to change into that form unless the creative person using the new technology had the scratchbuilding experience to create the program that the 3D printer used to instruct the raw material...resin or whatever...to become the final form.  It's really not that different from me creating a pattern from wood of a desired part, then building a mold box, pouring RTV over it and...after it cures...removing the original pattern.  Now I pour liquid resin into the RTV mold and when the resin hardens, I remove it.  Result?  I have a copy of the original pattern.  I have combined my skill at scratchbuilding with those needed to use a different technology to create a part that can be reproduced repeatedly and sold to anyone who would like one. 

Now, here's where it gets to be fun.  While, as I have described, Rusty and I would both have legitimate claims to being a modelmaker.  But if someone buys that part and uses it as instructed to a kit they are building...without any other detail beyond the commercially manufactured part...they are a modelbuilder, but are NOT a modelmaker unless they add detail of some kind that begins with some type of scratchbuilding material.

Bottom line is this: Creativity resides in the mind.  Without that spark, all the technology in the world won't help you.  It doesn't matter whether you use a block of wood, scalpel & sandpaper or a computer, CAD program & 3D printer.  When you have that God given spark or talent, you are a modelbuilder and as soon as you start adding detail created from raw material, you're a modelmaker.  You're also an artist, but that's a discussion for another day.

Richard

 

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Interesting points Richard. Before I retired I was a full time CNC Programmer in the engineering industry, so well used to drawing up parts on CAD to produce on CNC machines. Although I will agree about the need for creativity and engineering expertise to design parts in 3D, it is still the machine actually making the part, not the hands of a craftsman. Rusty having a model company naturally uses 3D printing for rapid prototyping and short run manufacture that would take much longer by traditional methods.

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DSC_0037.jpg.8ecb98958c00a2cf95da35eb43534bef.jpg

 

This what a PRUSA  printer is capable of producing ,over 100 PLA parts.  Still had to assemble and airbrush no different than polystyrene kit.

1/8 scale Little Boy from CGtrader.com.

 

Edited by Mister300
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To support Dan, here's an example of a 3D printed Godzilla fresh off the printer generated by a program called Z Brush

52753378-2032116376904147-3287948746721067008-n.jpg

The technology is here and if you look at the fact that this years George Lee award went to a 3D printed Lunar Module, it says a lot

 

Dave

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Can the replicator of Star Trek: The Next Generation be  far behind?  You know , where you simply speak what you want and the replicator creates it from basic atoms.  Doesn't matter whether it's a steaming hot steak dinner or a Stradivarius violin.

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On 11/11/2018 at 10:40 AM, Rusty White said:

Go to Shapeways.com.  I had someone design the 1/192 scale American civil war figures I sell on my web site and I was very pleased.  There is a whole section there containing folks who can design the STL files for you.

This is still the best 'short answer' to the original question. Am personally dabbling in CAD, but meanwhile got some fantastic replacement deck guns for the Revell Destroyer Escort from a guy on Shapeways. He listed them for the typical ship scales, but didn't hesitate to render a set for the odd Revell box scale of my kit. Could not be more pleased. Compare the kit gun vs the Shapeways find:

3in 50 cal 250th scale (8).JPG

3in 50 cal 250th scale (9).JPG

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I have not visited this thread for a while. But in the meantime I was looking at the website of a company named RS Components, who supply vast quantities of electronic components to industry in the UK. I do not know if they have warehouses in the States. However, on their site I came across their own powerful 3D CAD program that they have developed and can be downloaded and used for free. I think it is named Mechanical Spark 3D or something similar and can be used to create 3D solids for machining and also a sheet metal development program. I believe that they have a PCB CAD design program available as well.

Maybe some of you guys have come across it and used it...……………..so comments please!

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Fusion 360 is a 3D CAD program from Autodesk and is free for non-commercial, hobbyist use. I know a gentleman using it to produce 1/72 models of prototype and proposed aircraft. The results are amazing.

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Got a Elelgoo Mars Pro resin printer coming today.  

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Great choice. Elegoo Saturn looks awesome once they actually sell them. Make sure you You Tube some safety videos too and get alcohol (not the drinking kind)

 

 

Dave

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