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I've got a long wing trailing edge on my Sturmovik that doesn't quite join up properly. The upper half of the wing is longer than the lower, leaving about 1/64" difference that's gonna need fixing. I'm thinking of using baking soda and superglue to patch things up but, before I tackle this job, is there a better way out there? Haven't used the baking soda/CA trick in a number of years and don't want to screw things up. Any help appreciated!

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Best of luck. That's why I build tanks. Usually errors are easier to fix. I have never used the baking soda method before. Always straight super glue.

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I've got a long wing trailing edge on my Sturmovik that doesn't quite join up properly. The upper half of the wing is longer than the lower, leaving about 1/64" difference that's gonna need fixing. I'm thinking of using baking soda and superglue to patch things up but, before I tackle this job, is there a better way out there? Haven't used the baking soda/CA trick in a number of years and don't want to screw things up. Any help appreciated!

 

Super glue and baking soda is quick, but I have found that over time the resulting filler leaches out a brown ooze. Microballoons would be my choice with super glue for a filler, although medium viscosity super glue seems to work fine all by itself. If you need something to give the glue more body, the microballoons are the trick. Also, have you tried using super glue to attach a thin strip of Evergreen, sanding to shape once the glue is dry?

 

You can also try an accelerator, but the glue will become brittle when you use it. As always, sand once the glue is dry or you will be left with a rock-hard mass that will take 80-grit and a belt sander to remove....

 

Ralph

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- I build aircraft predominantly (Bikes and Armor close behind that) and use CA most of the time. I agree with most of what Ralph has noted but with a few differences. Of all the fuselage mismatches and wing shortages, I have not had to use more than just CA to assemble and fill gaps or steps. Sometimes, plastic scrap is used. I use accelerator regularly, on inside seams only. I try not to use it where I will be sanding (on the outside surfaces). And yes, highly recommended to sand as soon as it sets (usually in a few minutes), because the longer it sets (ie., overnight), the harder it gets. This adhesive application method has worked quite well for years now and I can usually have major components bonded, filled, sanded, rescribing of panel line details, and prepped for painting in one evening. My favorite CA is Plastizap, but there are others that work good too. And some that are less desirable, can't find the names, (since I don't keep them stocked). Best of luck with the build.

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I've used the CA/BakingSoda mix it a couple of times...both times without accelerator. Once to fill ejector pin marks on the bottom of a couple of horizontal stabs...and another time on a Sci-Fi build. The first time (a thin application) seemed to go OK for me, no problems...but the second (a thicker application) did turn brown (didn't notice any ooze) but the biggest problem I had was with paint adhering to that section. I wound up having to spray paint in that area THREE times...and the last time was a tedious masking exercise AFTER final assembly, just so I could place it on the shelf and not touch it again.

 

I'd rather use the gapfilling CA with a good primer afterwards...or build up Bondo Glazing Putty in thin layers and sand between each layer...or use liquid cement to attach styrene, and file/sand it to match the shape...I'll try anything other than the CA/Soda combo.

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May I suggest using BABY POWDER or TALC instead of baking soda? Thats' my favorite mixture and I've never had it turn brown or ooze anything. The one trick though is to use the CHEAPEST superglue out there (the 4 little black tubes for a buck at Walmart). Good superglue makes it set up too fast to be able to mix it properly and spread it into/onto the seams. See my latest pics on the a/c forum (T-28) showing the filler on the wingroots. Best of luck!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Great suggestions all. In this particular case, I'm thinking that the thin strips of evergreen with thick CA will work best. I'll give everything but the baking soda/CA method a try, eventually. Gil, I get all my superglue from the Dollar Store! I used to buy the expensive brands but found they dried out faster than I could build kits....

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I used to buy the expensive brands but found they dried out faster than I could build kits....
Dennis, you should put it in the fridge away from your film - it'll last longer.
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Film hasn't been in my fridge for a decade or so....digital only here. Yes, I may have to start stashing in the fridge again, especially if I end up purchasing a big bottle of it at Michael's this weekend....40% off coupon...

 

Dennis, you should put it in the fridge away from your film - it'll last longer.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I fill gaps, holes, and seams with stretched sprue affixed with a liberal dose of Faller Expert (which I'm not!) glue.

 

I have filled 1/4 inch gaps down to gaps no bigger than a scratch. I use the part tree from the kit being worked on...don't know if it makes a difference but the plastic then has the same "consistency" and the sprue used to fill the gaps.

 

I also use 3M Acryl Blue, an auto body putty. $25 per tube but a tube is a ten year supply for a mediocre modeler who ends up with lots of seams.

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Well, on this #$%&* Sturmovik I'm currently building, I can almost use a 2X4 to fill the gap in the wing/fuselage! A slight exaggeration. BTW, Dick, the shelf life on a tube of Acryl-Blu is 24 years....and counting. <_<

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Years ago, before you young 'uns started modeling and there were commercial fillers, we had to make our own. We would desolve sprue in Testors Liquid Cement. When it dried, it had the same hardness as the kit plastic.

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Well, on this #$%&* Sturmovik I'm currently building, I can almost use a 2X4 to fill the gap in the wing/fuselage! A slight exaggeration. BTW, Dick, the shelf life on a tube of Acryl-Blu is 24 years....and counting. <_<

 

You're a better modeler than I am. I have to fill so many holes and seams that I can nurse a tube along for about 10 years...

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