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Williams Bros 1/72 C-46 Build Series, Part 18, THE END

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Back for the 18th and last time...at least where the C-46 is concerned.  Hope you enjoy the final details and the beauty shots.

 

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C-46 Commandos displayed a dizzying variety of antenna configurations.  Essentially, the only way you can be entirely accurate is to have photos of the specific C-46 that you're replicating.  Since this model is a representative C-46A, I settled...with my client's agreement...on a single radio wire running from the vertical tail to the fuselage skin over the radio compartment.

A #79 (.016") drill bit in a pin vise was used to drill a hole.  Then a tiny bit of CA was applied to the end of a length of .0135" monofilament, inserted into the hole and allowed to dry.  While I used the line that John provided, any monofilament, EZ Line or invisible thread will also work.  It all depends on personal preferences or...in some cases...what's available.

 

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When you drill a hole in the vertical, it will be necessary to angle the bit slightly so that it comes out the side of the skin.  Then you can run the end of the monofilament thru the hole, pull it taught...carefully...and hang a weight on the loose end to keep the line straight.  Depending on circumstances, a clothespin or two will do the job, but if you need more weight, try a metal spring clip from your nearest office supply.  When the line is tight, add a small dab of CA using a toothpick or similar and allow to dry.

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When the CA dries, all that's left to do is nip the surplus monofilament flush with the skin and carefully touchup when necessary with matching paint.

 

And that, folks, puts FINISH to the Williams Bros 1/72 C-46A. Below are a selection of final photos.  All that remains is to pack it and ship it.

 

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That came out great, and belies all of the skills you had to apply to get it to look so good! Good luck with the packing and shipping!

 

GIL :cool:

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Thanks, Gil, for your kind comments.  Yeah, you're right.  Looking at the finished model, no one would suspect the skills it took or the problems that had to be overcome.

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Magnificent masterpiece! I bow to the Master.

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Mark, I really appreciate your gracious comments, but you're way too kind.  Granted, I managed to produce a pretty good model that should satisfy my client, but it wouldn't stand a chance at an IPMS/USA Nationals contest.  Still, thanks for your thoughts.

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Gil, as far as the packing and shipping is concerned...I took the box in a box approach.  An 18" x 22" x 9" box held the model...contained in a cradle of 4" urethane foam with 4" urethane foam holddown pieces over the outer wings.  That box was then contained in a 22" x 28" x 13" outer box with styrofoam peanuts in the surrounding space for padding.  The entire package weighed 10 pounds and shipped via USPS for $38.70.  So did it get there intact and did the client like it?  I don't know.

I received and email stating that the model arrived.  That's it.  No idea whether or not it arrived intact or damaged, nor do I know if the client liked it.  That's the way it goes when you do commission builds.

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