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Ronald

help with model cars and dealing with chrome parts

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Hello there to all car modelers 

 thinking about changing my modeling interest to cars but would like to know before I do how do you car guys and gals deal with the chrome 

 parts on the sprues, once removed there will be a spot or other areas that will need to be cleaned up and will show bare plastic, my questions 

 do you remove/ or strip all the chrome then clean up the imperfections like mold lines etc. and then re-chrome the parts if so which is the best 

 re-chrome paint, case in point the revell T-bucket which has a lot of chrome in the kit  how  to go about building that kit the  right way, I would 

  appreciate any help in that area, P.S. I know Donn Yost is a very car modeler and tried to ask him the same questions but he will help me 

 unless he soo busy that he no time to reply back to me thank you 

                                    Ronald 

 

Edited by Ronald

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Hey Ron...First off...I think you'll enjoy build scale cars, if you like 1/1 cars. OK..to try and answer your questions...

Personally... I strip all the chrome(using concentrated laundry bleach...Clorox is what I use) from every build that I do. The Chrome that's applied to most of the the kits are way too brite for the smaller scales. I will leave the chrome for 1/12th and larger builds.

To re-chrome....I shoot a Black or Blue High gloss base coats. Alclad II has Chrome that has a little learning curve. You can use Alclad polished Aluminum as it works good too. I also use ALSA Mirror Chrome which has a small learning curve but does not rub off when dry. 

If you want to leave the chrome and just touch up where it was cut from the sprue...then you can use a small paint brush( 3 0 or smaller) and a dab of Model Master Chrome Silver #FS 17178. Model Master has another chrome paint but it's not as good. I've used both and this one works the best between the two. Put a small amount of paint in a mixing pallet and add a drop or two of Lacquer thinner. Don't mix it in just let the thinner hit the edges of the paint and then load you brush and apply to the spot on the part. 

NOW...since MOLOTOW has come out with 3 paint pens and a refill bottle...all one has to do is just touch the part with it and it's rechromed. But...the small down side of it is..it takes at least 3-4 days for it to dry. It's is remarkable how well this paint looks when applied. If you can work with the dry time...then Molotow is the way to go. You can do a search on the web and watch a a few videos that's out there on it.

Well Ron...I hope I've shed a little light on the chrome thing for you. Just remember there's no right or wrong..it's what ever works best for you.

Gary

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I, too, have wondered about the bright chrome on model car parts, especially for models of classic cars, such as Deusenbergs, Packards, Mercedes, Rolls Royces, etc., from the 1930s. Were these parts actually "chromed," or were they in fact nickle-plated? Would toning down the chromed kit parts with a clear semi-gloss or satin finish be appropriate?

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thanks Gary  so much for your knowledge of model cars and the info on the chrome mystery I will look in to both ideas the 

 model master chrome silver and the MOLOTOW  again thanks P.S I know who to ask for help with model cars, along with anyone else 

  who wishes to help as well 

                                  Ronald 

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Hey Michael...

  you bet you can use a semi gloss(or semi flat...or just a flat clear...depending on the look you're after) on the Chrome parts. I'd forgotten about that technique. I just strip and re-shoot. But...In the case of a humungus amount of chrome like you mentioned...I think I'd cut from the spure...do the touchup on the small spots...wait a week...then apply the semi clear a little at a time. Now...Myself...I would shoot a thinned out amount thru my airbrush. You could brush it on but make sure to thin it a little. 

Hey Ron...you're very welcome.

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Ronald,

I wish you luck moving to the automotive genre.  I too have always wondered about how to treat chrome on 1/24 scale autos.  The big reason I have always avoided automotive kits is the super clean finish needed to accomplish a "scale" finish.  I've seen guys that just have the knack for doing it, but my airbrush skills IMHO, just aren't up to it.  Good luck.

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me too my airbrushing skills are not  to great 

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...or you could strip it, clean up all the seams and sink marks and use Bare Metal foil on it.  I actually like this better than any kit chrome or paint.  You and also handle it pretty easily without worrying about fingerprints. 

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Both Bare Metal Foil and the liquid chromes are horses for courses. Bare Metal Foil would be difficult to apply around contoured curves. Might get away with it on a very gentle compound curve but tight curves will present problems with this material. The foil is great for doing trim work and windscreen surrounds. I have used smooth shiny aluminium plumbing tape as well as BMF and find that as it is a bit thicker it is a bit more forgiving. The liquids such as AK Interactive, Alclad 2 and Molotow Chrome Ink come into their own when air brushed onto more complex shapes. AK and Alclad are for spraying, and the Molotow Refills can be used for Airbrush work. The Molotow Inks come in refillable applicators similar to marker pens in 1mm, 2mm and 4mm tip sizes. Really good for touching in the points where chrome parts are separated from runners if leaving the kit chrome on the parts and for small details such as emblems, logos and raised lettering on models.

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That Molotow chrome is the "bees knees" if you're going to keep the kit chrome and touch up the areas where the parts were cut from the sprue.

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