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schooner

THINNING ACRYLIC NO !

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Hi Guys

Some spray paint manufactures say there's no need to thin their paint

Is that true guys?

How as a Newcomer to airbrushing believe that!

Right out of their bottles and into my airbrush without thinning their acrylic spray paint!

How do they know that my IWATA SINGLE ACTION M2 would accept their consultancy if paint to run without a hitch?

What do you guys have to say to help this new guy out.

Don't get me wrong I love the idea of Not Thinning acrylic paint.

I await your knowledge.

Thanks guys.

Ray

a.k.a. schooner

IPMS#50934

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Ray,

Read the paint bottle, or online info. There may be recomendations as to air pressure and needle size. If you can meet those you should be good. As you progress you will developer your own prefs for paint thickness, etc. Always test new paint on scrap plastic first. Some of us use plastic spoons for this. Good luck.

Edited by cbush

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Hi Ray

 

I've spent the last year switching from lacquer/acrylic paints over to pure acrylic paints, and I've settled on the Vallejo Model Air line, because of health concerns and it's wide availability locally.

I usually include a lengthy discussion of airbrushing this paint in my reviews (search Eric Christianson, including the M1A2 Abrams cover article in IPMS USA two months back), but not always, so I'll summarize my approach here.

I use Vallejo thinner and an inexpensive product called Liquitex Flow Aid to thin their Model Air line (and yes, I feel it does need thinning for the best painting experience). Their 'dropper' type bottles allow precise measuring, which is another reason I like this paint. If you use the same mixing ratio you can pretty much count on the same results.

For a typical painting session, I will use a cheap, disposable clear plastic condiment cup to mix the paint in before pouring the mix into the color cup on my airbrush. My go-to ratio is 2 drops of flow air + 20 drops of thinner + 20 drops of paint. Swish that around and pour it into your airbrush.

I spray at around 20lbs pressure, and I hold the model so that I can see the paint hitting the surface of the model. This is very important with acrylics since you want to lay down ah bunch of very light layers of paint, building up the color on the surface. Keep the model moving constantly so that you don't saturate a single area with paint, causing it to run or drip (which is why I like to actually see the paint hit the surface). In a short time, you will see your color build up on the surface.

I use two airbrushes for all of my work, and the same procedure for both: a cheap old single action Pasche H and a double action Grex 'pistol grip' airbrush. I get very fine lines with both, as well as good overall coverage. I use the Grex when I have a small job since it can spray with just a few drops of paint, and the Pasche for larger jobs. I have found that it is not the airbrush, but the paint, and the user that makes a difference.

As far as adjusting the ratio for smaller and larger jobs, I use a consistent approach:

Small = 1 drop flow aid + 10 drops thinner + 10 drops paint

Larger = 3 drops flow aid + 30 drops thinner + 30 drops paint.

 

Good luck and remember to have fun!

 

Thanks!

Eric

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Thank you for an informative post. Of course, we have all developed our painting regimines, but your post is clear and concise.

I can't get model air paint locally, but have been thinking of ordering some. I do use model color for brush painting.

Great post, Eric.

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Ray,

 

Get yourself an old, cheap beater kit that you can practice on. Try whatever paint you want and thin it to whatever works best for you. I can't speak for anyone but myself, however, that's what I was taught years ago when it came to airbrushing and it has worked well enough for me. I used an old Testors/Hawk SBD dauntless kit ($.99 at KB toys!)....HTH

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Well said! Ray, don't assume the manufacturer in s wrong. Start with those instructions and see if it works for you. Then, modify to taste. P.S. Keith, don't disparrage that old Hawk SBD/ A-24. I built three or four of them in high school! I have fond memories of that kit!

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LOL! Nick, I built a few of those also and still a great kit to practice on. (My daughters first glue kit was this)

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Keith, Corrct me if I am wrong, bit I think the original had engraved insignia. I think I recall painting the engraved markings a la a paint by the numbers set!

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Nick, YES IT DID!! I think all Hawk kits did but am not 100% sure.

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Eric,

 

Very informative post. I just started using an airbrush. I see that you said you have a Grex dbl action pistol grip. I myself just got a Trinium TG for christmas and I was wondering, do you use a needle lubricant?

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