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'Lets go' WLA in 1/35


GregWise
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Good looking build Greg! As for suggestions, it would depend on what larger theme (if any) you had in mind. The only thing that caught my eye was the jacket, which looks much like a flight jacket, as opposed to a OD service jacket you'd expect an infantryman or tanker to be sporting. Nice work!

 

GIL :smiley16:

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Looks nice.

 

My suggestion involves the terrain and how it impacted the subjects....maybe it's the pictures and I'm not sure what the terrain is supposed to represent. In any event, the tires look brand-new/unused and a bit out of place and possibly the bottom of the raised boot. If this is mud...then muddy tires/boots and the rider/motorcycle would have left some tracks as well. If dry ground, then at least dusty tires/boots? And aged rubber should look somewhat duller/greyer?

 

--David

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Dave thanks for the great observations, I will be repainting the figure to address Gill's input but I'm not sure how to do a dried hard dirt road (that was my attempt), as for the tires I agree they need something. I appreciate all the great advice.

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Its interesting how people look at things differently based on their experiences and what-not, but we generally are drawn to something that seems out of place. GIL was drawn to the jacket which to me looked like a normal leather motorcycle jacket. I tend to be drawn to details that don't seem to match the big-picture and I wonder what I'm misinterpreting or if physics/reality is being violated in some manner. You probably see completely different aspects.

 

So, for me, the trigger was the cracks in the dirt--my first thought was it must have been really wet and was drying out. Without a reference point for the environment its ambiguous if the ground is still wet or not, but the cracks led me to then interpret the coloration of the ground as damp. And then I'm wondering why aren't the tires covered in mud. Again, this could be the photo and it looks completely different in real-life. Consider that if the MC and rider were on a cobblestone/paved road, then I would have seen nothing out of place other then he must have just gotten new tires. :)

 

Packed dirt roads or paths tend to be really beaten down where the animals or vehicles travel and potentially dusty. Perhaps think a lighter band/track where the traffic is from end to end and darker/foilage/grass/different where there isn't traffic.

 

It's not really a vignette/diorama to me, but you're implying movement and something happening. I think the model is nice, now perhaps tie up the loose visual ends into a cohesive package and it moves to the next level.

 

--David

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I concur with David in that for your dry road, all you really need is a coating of dust on the tire treads and also perhaps on the lower surfaces of the bike and the driver's boots. That would tie into general use in your setting.

 

GIL :smiley16:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Dave thanks for the great observations, I will be repainting the figure to address Gill's input but I'm not sure how to do a dried hard dirt road (that was my attempt), as for the tires I agree they need something. I appreciate all the great advice.

 

 

Hehe I didn't notice the jacket or the new tires. I saw the motor cycle and just figured the jacket was a leather jacket. :blush:

There's a few ways to handle the dirt. You could go and get some pigment in jars from Vallejo, MIG, AK the list goes on and on.

You could go to a craft store and they have sets of earth tone pastel sticks (don't get the waxy ones).

Or just go outside and pick up a little Tupperware full of dirt.

 

Take the dirt and with a stiff brush, just grind the dirt into the tires, and remember a little goes a long way in telling the story. You could also put some white glue down in spots on the groundwork and sprinkle pinches of dirt on the glue spots. You can then seal it all in with a light dusting of a flat clear coat.

 

HTH

 

Just remember scale. A tiny pebble in your fingers could be a giant boulder on the diorama.

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