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TimDarrah

Glad Press'n Seal Masks

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I just came across a killer masking technique. I'm working on the 1/72nd Hasegawa Nakajima B5N2 - Kate and had to paint the cowl/anti-glare shield area. I masked off the area where I needed the blue/black but the rest of the aircraft was already painted. I was going to take a zip-lock bag and use that as an overall mask, but remembered the "Press'N Seal", so thought that I'd try that to cover the entire kit. It works and was very simple to cut to shape, cover the wings and fuselage, and came off without any damage to the existing paint job. I did use my normal Tamiya tape to seal the PnS around the nose, but that was it. Try it You'll like it.

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Stupid question - enamels, lacquers, or acrylic? Any ill effects with the thinner and the press n seal? I had thought about trying this before but was afraid the press n seal might turn into a lump of goo if it came into contact with enamel or lacquer based paint / thinner

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Stupid question - enamels, lacquers, or acrylic? Any ill effects with the thinner and the press n seal? I had thought about trying this before but was afraid the press n seal might turn into a lump of goo if it came into contact with enamel or lacquer based paint / thinner

 

No, I use it all the time with enamel -- lots safer than actually using it with food. Like Tim said, it's great if you have to quickly cover a large area, just wrap it loosely on & ensure holes closed. I haven't found it sticks well enough on the edges to be used for pattern masking but I do use it to cover the area between tape/BluTak edges ....

 

John

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I have used Press and Seal alot with all types of paints. However, using it to mask bare metal finishes, it leaves a residue on the paint that I do not notice of other finishes.

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I shoot enamel with laquer thinner and it didn't hurt the model at all.

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I agree with press 'n seal. I have laid it over drawings and cut out the camo schemes and just laid the material on the model. Good seat for the edges etc. Also, yes it is a great way to protect a painted and decaled model when painting a final small area.

 

I use MM enamels and lacquer thinner. No problems. I have not tried to use it as a mask for canopies, just for big areas.

 

Clare

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Great tips guys!

I picked up a few rolls of this when it first came out, and have yet to try it. Now that you've "reminded me" I have it, it will make my life a little easier!

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I have used Press and Seal alot with all types of paints. However, using it to mask bare metal finishes, it leaves a residue on the paint that I do not notice of other finishes.

 

I was waiting for someone to mention that little "detail". Indeed, a true money saver, great for masking purposes, however, on enamels, in my personal experience, and Florida's merciless humid climate, it leaves a little "residue" that is a tad difficult to remove. If you are going to attempt removing that tiny "crud", do it softly, patiently, no hard pressure, with a moist (not wet) q-tip, easy does it, and only after the paint has cured a few days. Just my say-so, and advice, not the gospel or anything. The trick is to take the time to make it invisible. :smiley33:

 

If your doing a large area, and you can manage to put a plain sheet of copy paper, cut to fit, between the P and S, and the masked surface, it prevents this. Again, the area being masked should be fully cured, or "bad things" will happen. :smiley19:

 

This post caught my eye, as press and seal, has been a standard in most prop studios, for some time now. Glad you guys now know about it. I would have mentioned it, but no one ever asked? :smiley25:

 

Again, it works pretty good, but don't trust it until you've used it many times OK? B)

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I was waiting for someone to mention that little "detail". Indeed, a true money saver, great for masking purposes, however, on enamels, in my personal experience, and Florida's merciless humid climate, it leaves a little "residue" that is a tad difficult to remove. ........ snip ..............

 

Which is why I said it was safer for models than for food ...

 

John

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Which is why I said it was safer for models than for food ...

 

John

 

Good point John, you gotta wonder what exactly that "residue" is???? Not really something I want added to my daily dietary intake, yuck!!! :smiley11:

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Oh, and my apologies for "crossing the neutral zone", I know this isn't my section, just wanted to add a helpful note on my experience with this stuff. As I said, the post caught my eye, and I wanted to add just a little more data on this thread, hope that's all right.

 

I'm just passin' through................... :blush: .............back to the SF and Fantasy section I go! :smiley17:

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Oh, and my apologies for "crossing the neutral zone", I know this isn't my section, just wanted to add a helpful note on my experience with this stuff. As I said, the post caught my eye, and I wanted to add just a little more data on this thread, hope that's all right.

 

I'm just passin' through................... :blush: .............back to the SF and Fantasy section I go! :smiley17:

 

No apologies necessary. Feel free to cruise in anytime.

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Thanks Mark! :smiley20:

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Based on my experience, you were very lucky. I had less favorable results. The Press 'N Seal left a residual honeycomb pattern over the entire masked area. It destroyed the enamel paint job. After that it doesn't get a second chance.

 

I use Parafilm, which I buy in 2" wide rolls and stretch as instructed. It's a bit more expensive, but it has never damaged a surface. For very large areas, I make a mask with newsprint—not newspaper, which has inks that will do lots of harm, but inexpensive sketch paper available in various sizes in pads at art supply and crafts stores.

 

Regards,

Bruce

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Based on my experience, you were very lucky. I had less favorable results. The Press 'N Seal left a residual honeycomb pattern over the entire masked area. It destroyed the enamel paint job. After that it doesn't get a second chance.

 

I use Parafilm, which I buy in 2" wide rolls and stretch as instructed. It's a bit more expensive, but it has never damaged a surface. For very large areas, I make a mask with newsprint—not newspaper, which has inks that will do lots of harm, but inexpensive sketch paper available in various sizes in pads at art supply and crafts stores.

 

Regards,

Bruce

 

I've used sketch and Art paper for large areas before, but have not heard of Parafilm. Where is this material purchased Bruce? Sounds like it would be smart to check that out, before risking any more work with Press and Seal. I have found that the residue is problematic in different cases, as stated previously. And even lo-tack Frisket, presents certain residual marking problems.

 

Please provide a purchase location, or link to the product if possible, thanks! :smiley20:

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I've used sketch and Art paper for large areas before, but have not heard of Parafilm. Where is this material purchased Bruce? Sounds like it would be smart to check that out, before risking any more work with Press and Seal. I have found that the residue is problematic in different cases, as stated previously. And even lo-tack Frisket, presents certain residual marking problems.

 

Please provide a purchase location, or link to the product if possible, thanks! :smiley20:

 

Parafilm "M" (its full name) is a waxy film, originally developed to seal test tubes without contamination, if my information is correct. It comes in 2" and 4" rolls, and at one time came in 1" rolls (maybe it still does, but not at my vendor). You cut off a section, remove the paper backing, and with both hands gently stretch the material to about 4x its original size. It sticks to surfaces but won't pull paint. It's a little hard to get a precise edge. Testors used to sell the 1" rolls but dropped is several years ago.

 

I've had the same roll for several years, but I haven't built much over that time, either.

 

I buy it here [Link]

 

Here's an article on Hyperscale on using it: [Link]

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Parafilm "M" (its full name) is a waxy film, originally developed to seal test tubes without contamination, if my information is correct. It comes in 1" and 2" rolls. You cut off a section, remove the paper backing, and with both hands gently stretch the material to about 4x its original size. It sticks to surfaces but won't pull paint. It's a little hard to get a precise edge. Testors used to sell the 1" rolls but dropped is several years ago.

 

I buy it here [Link]

 

Here's an article on Hyperscale on using it: [Link]

 

Thanks very much Bruce, that's an interesting product. Goes to show, how you can learn something new, every day. That's what I really appreciate out of a Forum, some good useful information, along with tips and tricks. We have that here at IPMS, and that's cool in my book! :smiley20:

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Thanks very much Bruce, that's an interesting product. Goes to show, how you can learn something new, every day. That's what I really appreciate out of a Forum, some good useful information, along with tips and tricks. We have that here at IPMS, and that's cool in my book! :smiley20:

 

You're welcome, though I feel bad that once again I let myself hijack someone else's thread. I really shouldn't do that.

 

Sorry, Tim.

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Additional info. on this product, Parafilm is available in 4 inch, and 20 inch widths as well. Some of these sizes are in 125-250 foot long rolls! Quite a lot of masking material for anyone! These larger widths are available through medical supply wholesalers, I tried cardinal.com for a test search.

 

It appears as if you need an account with these guys to buy there, however, further searches may find it in easier places to buy it.

 

They sell in cases, so it might be pricey to buy from a wholesale outfit, that is geared towards medical facility accounts.

 

Frisket is very expensive, and not the greatest, in certain applications. This sounds like a good alternative without the risks of Press and Seal.

 

Great post, and thanks for the links Bruce!

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Bruce,

 

No need to apologise, you were adding hints and tips which helps other modelers. I used to use Parafilm, but haven't for years.

 

Tim

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Bruce,

 

No need to apologise, you were adding hints and tips which helps other modelers. I used to use Parafilm, but haven't for years.

 

Tim

 

Indeed, that's a great help to all of us, much appreciated actually! Model and art supplies are so expensive nowadays, hints like these are worth their weight in gold! :smiley20:

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