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ewahl
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Hi, Anthony,

 

Thanks for the compliment. I still have to work on finding the right background outdoors so I can avoid the out-of-scale tall grass, and the trees need to be closer to the camera. There was a slight wind that affected my "flames" and "smoke."

 

This is the ancient 1972 re-release of the 1/69-scale 1960 Revell V-2 rocket and transport trailer set. I bought it at a swap meet or club auction night (can't remember which) for $2.50 max. The previous owner had started on the interior pieces of the rocket and the trailer, rendering them useless because of horrible painting, blobs of glue, and broken pieces. The outer shell of the rocket and the launch stand were the only pieces I could salvage and use. This is a rivet kit from that era, so I could not really work on the rocket's seams without eliminating some of the rivets and raised details. I had the inspiration to make use of the bad seams by allowing "fire" and "smoke" to be venting out and also added some escaping from the four vents at the bottom by the exhaust nozzle. A bead of Elmer's clear glue in the seams and the lower vents attached the cotton. When the glue was dry and firmly attached, I began pulling away the excess cotton. Yellow, orange, red, brown, and black marking pens provided the colors to the cotton. The exterior color of the V-2 was from a 40-year-old tin of Humbrol German Luftwaffe Black Green, which worked well in the airbrush after all this time. Note: the V-2s were not painted in camo schemes during early testing, as some photos show only a dark monotone color.

 

Here's a picture of the model indoors without wind to blow on the cotton.

 

Ed

 

DSC03311_zpstqtoqesz.jpg

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Looking at the history and cost of your project, it goes to show that you don't need $200.00 of aftermarket products to make a $10.00 model look great.

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